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History of 

Huron County, Ohio 

Abraham J. Baughman, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company 




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HURON CO. 

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HISTORY 

OF 



HURON COUNTY 

r-' 1 ' OHIO 

ITS PROGRESS AND DEVELOPMENT 



By A. J. BAUGHMAN 



With Biographical Sketches of Prominent Citizens 

of the County 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO. 

1909 

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BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. CALEB HATHAWAY GALLUP. 

On reviewing the life record of any individual it is interesting to note some- 
thing of the ancestry from which he sprang and their characteristics, and thus 
to find the root of his own well developed traits. A contemporary historian has 
given the following: "J * 111 Gallup (i) born 1590, the ancestor of most of our 
families of that name, came to America from the parish of Mosterne, county Dor- 
set, England, in 1630. Just before leaving the old for New England, with 
solemn fasting and prayer, one hundred and forty persons at the new hospital 
at Plymouth, organized a Congregational church and chose Rev. John Warham 
and Rev. John Maverick to be their pastor and teacher, and sailed from Plymouth, 
England, March 20, 1630, in the Mary and John, a ship of four hundred tons, 
which arrived at Nantasket (now Hull), Massachusetts, May 30. "They were a 
very godly and religious people and many of them persons of note and figures, 
being dignified with the title of Mr., which few in those days were. Some of 
the principal men were Mr. Rosseter, Mr. Ludlow, Mr. Glover, Mr. Wolcott, Mr. 
Gallup and others." 

"His wife was Christobel (full name now unknown), and children were John 
(2), born in England, Joan, Samuel and Nathan. He became the owner and 
gave his name to Gallup's island off Boston harbor, by grant from Governor 
Winthrop, whose wife was a sister of Gallup's wife. A skillful mariner, he became 
memorable as commander of the first naval action off Block island, fought in 
North American waters, to avenge the murder of his friend Captain John Old- 
ham by Indians in the famous Pequot war of 1637. His son John (2) participated 
in the naval engagement off Block island and in King Philip's war as a captain, 
led a company of soldiers into the 'fearful swamp fight* at Narragansett, De- 
cember 19, 1675 (within the limits of the present town of South Kingston, Rhode 
Island), where he was killed. His wife was Hannah Lake and children: Hannah, 
John, Esther, Benadttm (3), William, Samuel, Christobel, Elizabeth, Mary and 
Margaret. 

"In the colonial records at Hartford may be found the following: 'February 
9, 1652-3, John Gallup in consideration and with respect unto the services his 



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6 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

father hath done for the country, hath given him up the river of Mistick, which 
side he will 300 acres of upland/ 

" 'February 6, 1653-4, John Gallup, hath given him a further addition to his 
land at Mistick, 150 acres, which he accepts of and acknowledgeth himself satis- 
fyde for what lands he formerly laide claim unto upon the general neck as a 
gift of his father's, which as he saith was given to his father by General Stoughton, 
after the Pequott war/ 

"Benadum of the third generation, born in 1655, married Esther Prentice, 
and their children were Hannah, Esther, Mercy, Benadum (4), Joseph, Margaret 
and Lucy. 

"Lieutenant Benadum (4), born 1693, married Eunice Cobb. Their children 
were Benadum, Esther, Eunice, Lois, William (5), Henry, Nathan, Ebenezer, 
Thomas P., Hannah and Sarah. 

"William of the fifth generation was living at Kingston, Pennsylvania, with 
seven children, in 1778, at the time of 'the Wyoming massacre/ His son Hallet, 
twenty-two years old, escaped death by floating down the Susquehanna river 
patrolled by hostile Indians, his body under water and face between two rails 
grasped in his hands. Twin daughters, five years of age, were carried off by the 
Indians as pretty prizes, but soon recovered by ransom. He was born July 4, 
1723, married Judith Reed, their children were Lydia, Hallet, Mary, William (6), 
Hannah, Sarah and Lucy. 

"William of the sixth, born at Groton, Connecticut, married Freelove Hatha- 
way, a Philadelphia Quakeress, and had William, Hallet (7), James Devine, and 
Caleb Hathaway. 

"Hallet of the seventh generation was an artillery gunner in Captain Thomas' 
company of Pennsylvania volunteers and served under General William Henry 
Harrison in the war of 181 2. He was born 1796, married Clarissa Benedict, 
daughter of Piatt and Salley DeForest Benedict, first settlers of Norwalk. Their 
children were Catherine, Mariah, Lydia, Carroll, Sarah, Eliza, Caleb Hathaway 
(8), and Elizabeth F." 

Caleb Hathaway Gallup is a representative of the eighth generation of 
Gallups in America and was born in Norwalk, Ohio, May 10, 1834. He was 
reared to hard work on a farm and his first school experience was in the Nor- 
walk Union schools, which he attended during the winters of 1850, 1851 and 
1852. In 1853, he filled a position in the office of the Huron county clerk and 
then, resuming his interrupted education, matriculated at Denison University, 
Granville, Ohio, in 1854, entering for the scientific course. In the fall of that 
year, he was transferred to the same class and course at Madison University, 
now Colgate, at Hamilton, New York, where he promoted the founding of Mu 
chapter of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. On the completion of his course, 
he was graduated in 1856 with the degree of Bachelor of Science and followed 
this by preparations for the bar as a student in the office of Worcester & Pen- 
newell in Norwalk, Ohio. There he remained until the fall of 1857, when he 
entered the law school of the Cincinnati College and was graduated therefrom 
with the Bachelor of Law degree on the 15th of April, 1858. 

Mr. Gallup was admitted to practice before the bar of Michigan, July 19, 1859, 
and in i860 was elected prosecuting attorney of Huron county, Michigan, which 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 7 

office he held by re-election for ten consecutive years. During that same period, 
in 1866-7, he represented his district in the state legislature and left the impress 
of his individuality and clear insight into public affairs upon the legislative en- 
actments of that section. Among other laws and resolutions enacted on his initia- 
tion, was a law for the relief of a stranded colony of educated Germans, an off- 
shoot or protege of the "Economites" of Harmony, Pennsylvania, giving the 
head of each family a forty-acre homestead of state lands. He also introduced 
a law appropriating ten sections of state land for the navigable improvement of 
the outlet of the River Du Fill in Huron county, Michigan, and a joint resolu- 
tion calling for the construction by the general government of a harbor of refuge 
on Lake Huron at or near Point Au Barques. 

Mr. Gallup's labors and efforts throughout his entire life have largely been of 
service to the general public. In 1868 he procured by personal solicitation of 
resident citizens along the route the donation and erection of seventy miles of 
telegraph poles, from Lexington to Port Austin, Michigan, and through his in- 
fluence, with Anson G. Stager, of the Western Union Telegraph Company, the 
completion of the first telegraph line of the west coast of Lake Huron — a work 
that has been of immeasurable benefit to the citizens of that locality. 

In the meantime, Mr. Gallup had done military service as deputy United 
States marshal, from 1863 to 1865 inclusive, in which connection, he was active 
in enforcing the draft during the war. He was himself drafted, but was ordered 
back to the service of the marshal. Again he was identified with military af- 
fairs, when in 1877 he became a member of the Ohio National Guard and so con- 
tinued for five years, or until 1882. 

Mr. Gallup has been married twice. He first wedded Kate V. Vredenburgh, 
a representative of an old New York Dutch family, the wedding being celebrated 
June 20, i860. They had one son, Richard Carroll, who was nineteen months 
old at the time of the mother's death, on the 25th of May, 1863. On the 3d of 
November, 1869, Mr. Gallup wedded Helen Alphena Glover, a niece of the Hon. 
Joel Parker, "war governor ,, of New Jersey. The death of his second wife, April 
8, 1872, leaving him with a daughter, Mabel Parker, eighteen months old, and a 
son, Herbert Alpheus, four days old, caused his return to his old home in Nor- 
walk, Ohio. 

Since again taking up his abode in Norwalk, Mr. Gallup has been prominently 
and actively interested in business affairs and in other interests relating to the 
welfare and progress of the community. From 1873 until 1883, ne was connected 
with the promotion and construction of the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad, and 
for three years, beginning in 1877, served on its board of directors. In 1888, 
he was associated with other substantial business men in founding the financially 
successful Home Savings & Loan Company of Norwalk. at which time he was 
chosen president and one of the directors, his official connection therewith con- 
tinuing to the present. He has also extended his efforts to other fields of activity, 
becoming one of the directors and a member of the executive committee of the 
Toledo, Fremont & Norwalk Electric Railway at the time of its construction in 
1899. He thus served until its sale in 1901 to the Lake Shore Electric Company. 

Few men have taken so active a part in the work of general progress and 
improvement as Mr. Gallup. All matters of general concern elicit his interest 



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8 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

and whenever his judgment sanctions, he gives to a measure his hearty support 
and co-operation. In 1877, he became a life member of the Whittlesey Academy 
of Arts and Sciences, and since 1878, has served as a member of its board of 
trustees, acting as chairman of the board throughout the entire time and as treas- 
urer of the institution, since 1901. In 1879, he wrote a history of Norwalk for 
W. W. Williams' "History of Huron and Erie Counties/' and because of his 
deep research into the annals of the county, no man is more competent to write 
upon historical subjects in this locality, than he. Mr. Gallup has also been a 
life member of the Firelands Historical Society since 1876 and a member of its 
board of trustees, librarian, curator of its museum and editor of its publications, 
since 1888. In 1889, he became a member of the board of trustees of the Huron 
county Children's Home Association and has been its treasurer since 1902. He 
is likewise a member of the Young Men's Library and Reading Room Association, 
of Norwalk, controlling the Free Public Library, and has been a member of its 
board of trustees and chairman of its executive committee, since 1903. He is a 
member of the Norwalk Board of Commerce and of the National Geographical 
Society, and is a life member of the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society, 
of which he was elected a member of its board of trustees and executive com- 
mittee on the 2d of March, 1909. Hon. E. O. Randall, secretary and editor of 
that society, in comment on his selection as a trustee said : "Mr. Gallup is known 
throughout the country for his historical scholarship and for the active and ex- 
tensive work he has done in connection with the Firelands Historical Society, of 
which he has been an influential and official member for a number of years. He 
has always been an enthusiastic student of Ohio and western history and has 
written much that is interesting and accurate concerning the early settlement of 
the Buckeye state." 



CHARLES P. WICKHAM. 

Charles P. Wickham, who by the consensus of public opinion is regarded as a 
high type of American manhood and citizenship, has for many years been en- 
gaged in the practice of law in Norwalk and throughout the entire period has 
been numbered among the representative members of the Huron county bar. 
His birth occurred in this city, September 15, 1836. He is the oldest of the 
thirteen children of Judge Frederick and Lucy (Preston) Wickham, both of 
whom were descended from Puritan ancestry. In the paternal line was Governor 
Winthrop, an early colonial governor of Massachusetts, The first representative 
of the Wickham family in the middle west was William Wickham, a native of 
Rhode Island, who with an instinctive love of the sea, settled on the shores of 
Lake Ontario at Sodus Point. His four sons, John, Thomas, Frederick and Sam- 
uel Wickham, were there reared and when they had attained their majority, all 
except Thomas removed to Huron, situated on one of Lake Erie's natural harbors. 
Samuel Wickham sailed on the lakes, being thus engaged up to the time of his 
death. John Wickham engaged in lake commerce and was also the owner of 
one of the largest fish packing establishments on the lake. Frederick Wickham 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 11 

removed to Norwalk and later became proprietor of the Norwalk Reflector, a 
paper which had been established as the Huron Reflector by Samuel Preston, 
whose daughter Lucy he had married. In the roomy, old-fashioned house in the 
center of the town, the upper floor of which was used as a printing office, were 
born the six sons and seven daughters of this marriage. 

This number included Charles P. Wickham who, after acquiring his early edu- 
cation in the public schools, attended the Norwalk Academy. He longed for a 
college education, but the expense attending, the support of a large family, pre- 
vented the father from enabling the son to carry out his wishes in this direction. 
He prepared for a professional career by attending the Cincinnati Law School, 
from which he was graduated in April, 1858. He then entered upon the active 
practice of his profession in his native state and, with the exception of the period 
spent at the front during the Civil war, 'has been a continuous representative of 
the Huron county bar to the present time. He is widely recognized as one of the 
most important, best known and highly respected lawyers in this part of the 
state, confining his attention to the active practice of his profession. He is the 
president and director of the A. B. Chase Company, of Norwalk, manufacturers 
of pianos. 

In August, i860, Mr. Wickham was united in marriage to Miss Emma J. 
Wildman, a daughter of Frederick A. and Mariette (Patch) Wildman, natives 
of Danbury, Connecticut. By this union there are six living children, four sons and 
two daughters, namely : Charles P., Jr., who is a general life insurance agent at 
Norwalk ; Grace W., the wife of C. C. Curran, a well known artist of New York 
city ; Louis W., an attorney at law and late prosecuting attorney of Huron county . 
Winthrop H., a mining engineer and merchandise broker, now residing in Denver, 
Colorado ; Romeyn D., a practicing attorney, who is now in partnership with his 
father ; and Mary G., at home. 

In September, 1861, Mr. Wickham bade adieu to his young wife and with pa- 
triotic ardor, offered his services to the government, enlisting as a member of the 
Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for four years. He 
rose from private through the ranks of first lieutenant, captain and major to that 
of lieutenant colonel, receiving in addition thereto a brevet commission direct from 
the president, "for gallant and meritorious services in Georgia and the Caro- 
linas." He participated in a number of important engagements, including the 
second battle of Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mission Ridge, Resaca, 
Peach Tree Creek and all of the campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta, includ- 
ing the siege and surrender of the latter place, followed by the march to the sea, 
which exposed the weakness of the southern Confederacy. He inspired the sol- 
diers under him with much of his own valor and bravery and made a most credi- 
table record throughout his long military experience. He is a valued member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic and the Loyal Legion. 

At the close of the war Colonel Wickham returned to Norwalk and entered 
upon the private practice of his profession. In 1866, he was elected prosecuting 
attorney of the county and two years later was re-elected, so that his incumbency 
continued until 1871. In 1880, he was elected judge of the common pleas court 
of the fourth judicial district, was re-elected in 1885, and sat upon the bench 
until 1886, when he resigned to become a candidate for congress from the four- 



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12 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

teenth district. He was elected in that year and re-elected in 1888, proving an 
active working member in the national halls of legislation. It is a notable fact 
that to each office to which he has been called, he has also been re-elected — proof 
positive of his ability and fidelity in the discharge of his duties. His entire offi- 
cial service has been in the direct path of his profession and the record is an un- 
tarnished one. Since his retirement from office, he has continuously and success- 
fully practiced in Norwalk and has ever maintained a foremost place in the ranks 
of her leading attorneys. He is a man of broad scholarly attainments, an able 
speaker at the bar, in congress and on public occasions on which he has been 
called to address the people at large. He stands as a splendid representative of 
American manhood and citizenship, a high type of the Christian gentleman who is 
actuated in all that he does by lofty purposes and principles. 



HAMILTON A. LOWTHER. 

Hamilton A. Lowther, a farmer of Greenfield township and the owner of ninety 
acres of land on which he lives, was born in this township about half a mile from his 
present place of residence in a southerly direction, February 4, 1861, was the day 
of his birth and Jackson and Susan (Tower) Lowther were his parents. His pa- 
ternal great-grandfather was a resident of New York city and was a prize fighter 
by profession. He achieved quite a reputation in his day for physical strength and 
prowess, and his name was frequently that of the victor in boxing contests. He 
was also a man of considerable wealth, which he one time put to the service of a 
friend, only to find that his trust was misplaced, for the latter jumped his bond and 
Mr. Lowther had to forfeit the sum of money he had guaranteed. His son Edward 
came to this part of Ohio from New York at an early day. He secured a grant of 
land from the government and immediately set about clearing it and making it 
ready for habitation. For lack of a better home he lived for many years in a log 
cabin which he had himself erected. His son, Jackson Lowther, the father of our 
subject, was born here and has passed all his life in this county. His wife was 
also of Ohio nativity, Sandusky having been her birthplace. Her cares as a faith- 
ful wife and mother were brought to an end in 1904, and a husband and three chil- 
dren have since mourned her loss. The latter are Hamilton A. ; Hermie, the wife 
of Elvin McCord, of Sherwood, Ohio; and Nora, the wife of Henry White of this 
county. Mr. Lowther still follows farming despite his seventy years and is a 
member of the Universalist church. 

This township has always been the home of Hamilton A. Lowther, and to the 
schools here does he owe the education he was able to acquire in the intervals be- 
tween the busy seasons on the farm, for he was reared at home and early was 
given his tasks to perform about the house and in the fields. He follows diversi- 
fied farming, which has brought him more than a mere living. Of late years the 
hard work has been lightened by the assistance of his sons, who are promising 
young men and display an aptitude for farming. 

On the 17th of December, 1889, was performed the ceremony that made Ham- 
ilton A. Lowther and Miss Nellie Fewson man and wife. Mrs. Lowther is a 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 13 

daughter of Michael and Sarah (Daly) Fewson, well known citizens of Green- 
field township. Three children have been born of this union : James, Harry and 
Jay, all of whom live at home. A hard worker, a careful manager and thrifty 
farmer, Mr. Lowther is one of those that raise the standard of Greenfield town- 
ship as a great farming community. 



MRS. AMANDA J. SKILTON. 

Mrs. Amanda J. Skilton, a well known and highly esteemed resident of Ridge- 
field township, making her home on her farm of sixty-five acres, was born at Gal- 
ion, Crawford county, Ohio, her parents being John S. and Catharine (Ncflf) Da- 
vis. The family is an old one in this country, several representatives of the name 
having participated in the Revolutionary war. The place on which Mrs. Skilton 
lives is a portion of the original farm belonging to her great-grandfather, John 
Sowers, who owned seven hundred acres of land. The grandfather, John Sow- 
ers, was an early settler of Huron county, coming here in 1814. John S. Davis, 
the father of Mrs. Skilton, was born in Maryland in 1808 and passed away in the 
year 1888. His wife, whose birth occurred in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 
1822, was called to her final rest in 1890. Their family numbered four children, 
namely: John S. Jr., who is now deceased ; Amanda J., of this review ; Kittfe Belle, 
who has also passed away; and Mary E., who gave her hand in marriage to 
Thomas Latham and now resides in Monroeville, Ohio. 

In 1865, at Galion, Ohio, Amanda J. Davis was united in marriage to Alva S. 
Skilton, a son of Elijah and Elizabeth (Wilson) Skilton, of Ravenna, Ohio. At 
the time of the Civil war Alva S. Skilton enlisted for service in the Union army, 
returning home at the end of his three months' term. A short time afterward he 
reenlisted and was soon made captain of Company I, Fifty-seventh Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry. He underwent all of the hardships, privations and dangers incident 
to the life of a soldier, participated in a number of hotly contested engagements and 
was also a prisoner for a time. At the battle of Pittsburg Landing he received a 
wound and was sent home to recuperate, again joining the army when his health 
had been restored. He was captured at Atlanta and was on his way to be ex- 
changed as a prisoner of war when the news of Lincoln's assassination was re- 
ceived. When hostilities had ceased and the supremacy of the Union had been es- 
tablished he returned to Galion and in 1866 came to Monroeville, Ohio, where he 
became engaged in the grain business and conducted an elevator. For a number 
of years he was also an engineer on the Big Four Railroad and was widely recog- 
nized as a most substantial, progressive and respected citizen of his community. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party, while his religious faith 
was indicated by his membership in the Episcopal church, in which he served as 
junior warden. He attained the Knight Templar degree in Masonry and organized 
the G. A. R. post at Monroeville, of which he was the first commander. His death 
occurred July 27, 1887. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Skilton were born four children. John D , living in Che- 
shire, Connecticut, wedded Miss Ida Beistle, of Pennsylvania, by whom he had three 



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14 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

children : Henry A. ; Jane D., who is deceased ; and John D. He is a graduate of 
the public schools of Monroeville, the Kenyon College and also of Divinity School 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and for a number of years was assistant rector to 
Dr. Bates of St. Paul's church at Cleveland. Later he was assistant rector at the 
American church at Nice, France, but is now headmaster of the schools of Che- 
shire, Connecticut. Elizabeth, the second child of Mr. and Mrs. Skilton, at- 
tended Oberlin College and now makes her home with her mother. Mary Grace, 
who obtained her education in the schools of Gambier, gave her hand in marriage 
to Clarence L. Powley and resides at Monroeville. Catharine, the youngest mem- 
ber of the family, who likewise acquired her education at Gambier, lives with her 
mother. 

The different members of the family belong to the Episcopal church, in the. 
work of which they are deeply and helpfully interested. Mrs. Skilton and two of 
her daughters live in a commodious and attractive brick residence on her farm 
of sixty-five acres in Ridgefield township and the place is lacking in none of the 
equipments and accessories of a model farming property of the twentieth century. 
She has an extensive circle of friends throughout the community where she has now 
long resided, her many good traits of heart and mind having endeared her to all 
with whom she has come in contact. 



C. A. SCHEID. 



A well improved and highly developed farm of one hundred and forty acres, 
situated hi Sherman township, is the home of C. A. Scheid. His birth occurred 
in February, 1867, am! he has remained a resident of Sherman township through- 
out his entire life. His parents, Jacob and Barbara (Beilstein) Scheid, who were 
natives of Germany, became early settlers of Huron county, Ohio. Their family 
numbered ten children, namely: William and Elizabeth, both of whom are now 
deceased ; Emma ; C. A., of this review ; Henry ; Minnie ; George ; John ; Fred ; and 
Albert. 

C. A. Scheid attended the district schools until twelve years of age and then 
became identified with general agricultural pursuits, in which he has been success- 
fully engaged to the present time. In 1906 he bought his present farm of one hun- 
dred and forty acres from his father and has since been busily engaged in its opera- 
tion, the well tilled fields annually yielding golden harvests of grain. Everything 
al out the place indicates that he is in touch with the modern spirit of progress 
which is manifest in agricultural lines. 

On the 21st of October, 1897. Mr. Scheid was united in marriage to Miss 
I cuisa Boehler, a daughter of William and Mary Hoehler, residents of Monroe- 
ville, Ohio. She was the eldest in a family of eight children, her brothers and sis- 
ters being as follows: Anna, who has passed away; August; Minnie, who is like- 
wise deceased ; Amanda ; Edith ; Karl, and Elmer. Mr. and Mrs. Scheid now have 
four children: Mabel, who was born in 1897; Ada, whose birth occurred in 1800; 
Marion, born in 1904 rnd Olive, in 1905. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 15 

Mr. Scheid gives his political support to the men and measures of the republi- 
can party and has served as road supervisor, in which position he proved a most 
capable and faithful incumbent. He and his family are all members of the Luth- 
eran church. His life has been one of continuous activity, in which has been ac- 
corded due recognition of labor, and today he is numbered among the substantial 
citizens of his community. His interests are thoroughly identified with those of 
Huron county and at all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any 
movement calculated to benefit this section of the country or advance its wonderful 
development. 



ED. L. YOUNG. 



Ed. L. Young, editor of The Bee Hive national organ of the Knights of the 
Maccabees of the World, was born in New Haven, Huron county, Ohio, Jan- 
uary 19, r864, his parents being Morgan and Amelia (House) Young. The 
father was born March 9, 1819, and the mother's birth occurred April 20, 1823. 
The father, Morgan Young, for a time attended the old Norwalk Academy, in 
which school his future wife was at the same time a student. They were mar- 
ried on the 29th of November, 1846, and established their home at North Mon- 
roeville, Ohio, where Mr. Young engaged in general farming ; they moved to New 
Haven, Huron county, some years after. Unto him and his wife were born 
eight children, namely: Lucy, who was born October 5, 1847; Louisa, October 
22, 1848; Mehetta, December 15, 1852; Julius N., November 7, 1854; Albert, 
March 10, 1857; Clara, who was born June 5, 1861, and died September 6, 1863; 
and Ed. L. and Edna, twins, whose birth occurred January 19, 1864. The death 
of the husband and father occurred September 24, 1884 in Ripley township; 
the mother is still living. 

In the common schools, Ed. L. Young mastered the early branches of Eng- 
lish learning and subsequently engaged in teaching. He has always been of a stu- 
dious nature and his reading and research have covered a wide range. Leav- 
ing the teacher's profession, he entered the field of journalism in Norwalk and 
was with The Chronicle for eight years, four of these as editor. He became 
state manager for the Knights of the Maccabees of the World in 1832, and in 
1901, became the national editor of the order, retaining position as manager for 
Ohio also. When he assumed the office of manager the order numbered four 
thousand in Ohio and thirteen thousand in the United States. Now there is a 
membership of thirty-seven thousand in Ohio, with three hundred thousand in 
the country, representing three hundred and fifty million dollars in insurance, 
protection of members in five thousand tents. Mr. Young's advocacy of the 
order through the columns of the paper has done not a little to further its inter- 
ests and he is widely and favorably known among the representatives of the 
fraternity in this country. 

On the 20th of March, 1884, Mr. Young was married to Miss Carrie M. 
Houfstetter, a native of Ripley township, Huron county, and a daughter of 
Jacob M. and Rowena (Carpenter) Houfstetter, who were pioneer residents of 



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16 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

this county. Her grandfather, Rev. Orson Carpenter, was one of the early Bap- 
tist preachers of this part of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Young have become par- 
ents of two children: Ethel M., who was born March 10, 1885, and died April 
2, 1 89 1 ; and Arthur F., who was born July 31, 1889, and is now a law' student! 
in Western Reserve University. 

Mr. Young is identified with several other organizations in addition to the 
Maccabees, being now affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the 
Knight Templar degree. He is a man of good business ability, who is now 
bending his energies to administrative direction and executive control as manager 
of the paper which has the support of and is the expression of the best interests 
of the Knights of the Maccabees. 



D. W. RUMBAUGH, M. D. 

Dr. D. W. Rumbaugh, president of the Huron County Medical Association, 
who has successfully practiced in Huron county since 1878, opening his office 
in Chicago Junction in 1891, was born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, August 
24, 1846. His father, Isaac Rumbaugh, was a native of Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania, born December 23, 181 5, and in 1819, he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Chester township, Wayne county, Ohio. The mother of the 
Doctor was Mrs. Mary Rumbaugh, who was born in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, and arrived in Green township, Wayne county, Ohio, in 1835. On the 
8th of March, 1838, she gave her hand in marriage to Isaac Rumbaugh and they 
have become the parents of five children. The father lived and died in Wayne 
county, passing away in 1888. He had long survived his wife who died in 1851. 
Tracing back the ancestral history of the family, we learn that the first Rumbaughs 
in America, were located here in 1764, in which year three brothers sailed from 
Germany and settled in Connecticut. Of these Henry and Solomon Rumbaugh 
served as loyal soldiers of the American army in the Revolutionary war, while 
the other brother, David Rumbaugh, went to Canada and was never heard from 
again. In 1797, Henry Rumbaugh settled in Northampton county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and was the father of twenty-five children, all of whom married and reared 
families. 

Dr. Rumbaugh, a decendant of that family, was educated in the public schools, 
continuing his studies until he was graduated from the Smithville (Ohio) high 
school. Eventually, he pursued a course in the university at Canton, Missouri, 
and then, taking up the study of medicine, attended lectures and studied at Cin- 
cinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. He was graduated from the medical 
department of the University of Wooster at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1873, anc l com- 
menced practice in Polk, Ashland county, where he remained for five years. 
On the expiration of that period, he opened an office at Greenwich, Huron 
county, where he remained from 1878 until 1891. In that year, he came to Chi- 
cago Junction and has in the intervening years, sustained an enviable reputation 
as one of the leading practitioners of the county. His patronage is continually 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 19 

increasing, for he has given proof of his ability to successfully cope with the in- 
tricate problems that continually confront the physician. In the diagnosis of his 
cases, he is very careful and his professional brethren entertain high respect for 
his judgment. Moreover, he closely conforms to a high standard of professional 
ethics. In addition to his private practice, he is acting as surgeon for the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad Company and he belongs to the Association of Baltimore & 
Ohio Railway Surgeons, to the International Association of Railway Surgeons, to 
the American Medical Association, to the Ohio State Medical Association and to 
the Huron County Medical Society, being president of the last named. 

On the 23d of March, 1871, Dr. Rumbaugh was married to Miss Sarah A. 
Jones, who died in 1883 and in 1888, he was again married, his second union being 
with Jennie Graham, a native of Greenfield township, Huron county, and a 
daughter of Alexander Graham, one of the earliest settlers of this part of the 
state. There were three children of the first marriage : Hattie O., now the wife 
of Thomas McMahon ; Samuel C. ; and Bertha M., now Mrs. Keith Van Horn, of 
Chicago, Ohio. 

Dr. Rumbaugh has always been an active democrat and has ever taken a help- 
ful interest in party work, doing everything in his power to promote the growth 
and insure the success of the party. While living at Polk, he served as a member 
of the board of education and also of the town council. He rendered similar 
service at Greenwich and at Chicago Junction and has likewise served as a member 
of the board of public affairs in this place. His work has at all times been of a 
beneficial nature, being actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good. 
Fraternally Dr. Rumbaugh is connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and is a Mason of high rank, belonging to Golden Rule Lodge, No. 562, 
F. & A. M. ; Golden Rule Chapter, No. 167, R. A. M. ; Norwalk Commandery, 
No. 18, K. T. ; and Lake Erie Consistory and is also a director in the Chicago, 
Ohio Temple Company. He is in thorough sympathy with the beneficent spirit 
of the craft, which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness and 
in practice, he utilizes the opportunities to bring its principles into active play. 



ASHER M. COLE. 



Asher M. Cole is the sole owner of the beautiful homestead property of one 
hundred and twenty-five acres just outside of the city limits of Norwalk whereon 
the Cole family has lived for many years. He is one of the best known citizens of 
Huron county, respected and honored wherever known and most of all where best 
known. In tracing the ancestry of the family we find thai the first authentic rec- 
ord is of one John Cole, who was born in England in 1670. His son and namesake, 
born in the same country in 1705, came to America in colonial days and spent the 
latter portion of his life in Connecticut. He was twice married, his first wife be- 
ing a sister of Benjamin Franklin, while his second wife, bore the maiden name of 
Mary Brown. John Cole was the father of six children, two sons and four daugh- 
ters, the eldest of whom was John, while the second was named Thomas. The lat- 



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20 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ter was born in Windham county, Connecticut, August 25, 1735, and on the 7th of 
December, 1757, he married Miss Miriam Kinne, by whom he had the following 
children: Silas, Amos, Spencer, Levi, Thomas, Jeremiah, Samuel, Mary, Eunice 
and Marion. The descendants of this family are very numerous and are scattered 
throughout many portions of the United States. 

Levi Cole, the fourth son of Thomas and Miriam (Kinne) Cole, was born No- 
vember 30, 1766, in Windham county, Connecticut, was married November 25, 
1790, and died in Norwalk, Ohio, February 11, 1820. His wife, Hannah Kinne, 
was born in Windham county, Connecticut, July 24, 1770, and died at Norwalk, 
Ohio, February 27, 1840. They had seven sons and two daughters, namely: Jere- 
miah, born March 7, 1795, came to Ohio in 1815 and died July 30, 1818; Asher, 
born April 23, 1797, came to Ohio in 1816 and died November 4, 1830; James, 
who was born April 25, 1799, and came to Ohio in 1816, was married January 15, 
1824, to Miss Philena Johnson, who was born October 4, 1802, and they had four 
sons and one daughter: Albert, born October 2, 1824; Bryan, who was born March 
7, 1828, and died May 10, 1863 ; Starry H., who was born March 6, 1831, and died 
October 30, 1876, after having served for ninety days as a soldier of Company B, 
One Hundred Sixty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with the rank of 
second lieutenant ; George W., who was born February 22, 1835 and died January 
6, 1893, after having served for three years in the Third Ohio Cavalry ; and Maria, 
who was born August 13, 1841, and died January 1, 1892. The father of these 
children died December 26, 1881, and the mother passed away on the 30th of April 
of the same year. Levi Cole, Jr., son of Levi Cole, Sr., was born March 23, 1801, 
came to Ohio in 1816, and died in Richfield township, Huron county. Miner, born 
July 26, 1803, came to Ohio in 1816 and died in Norwalk. Manley K., born Feb- 
ruary 11, 1807, came to Ohio in 1816. Lyman, born March 10, 1810, arrived in 
this state in r8i6 and died October 10, 1853. The daughters were Hannah, who 
was born March 11, 1792, and died August 24, 1795; and Ardelia, who was born 
December 4, 181 1, and died May 8, 1812. 

In 1813 Levi Cole, Sr., was living in Herkimer county, New York, where he met 
with financial reverses after his marriage and in that year, in company with Ma- 
jor David Underhill and Timothy Baker, he came to Ohio to look at lands owned 
by Mr. Underhill in Richfield township, Huron county. The land and prospect 
suited him and he arranged for the purchase of a tract adjoining the farm of Sid- 
ney Brown, after which he returned home. In 181 5 he again came to Ohio ac- 
companied by his son Jeremy, by Horace Morse, Dr. Joseph Pierce and David Un- 
derhill. He at once erected a house on his land, began clearing away the timber 
and otherwise prepared for bringing his family the next year. In the fall, leaving 
his son Jeremy to look after the place and continue the improvements, he returned 
home. During this visit, on the 16th of July, 181 5, Levi Cole, with Major Under- 
hill and Dr. Joseph Pierce, brushed out a trail, or road, from Abijah Comstock's 
place to the Sand Ridge, now Norwalk. At night they returned to Mr. Corn- 
stock's home and the next day started out and completed their work through the 
Underhill place on the 17th. This was the first highway labor done on Main street. 
They followed the old Indian trail, which came out on the Ridge road somewhere 
between Main and Chatham streets. In January, 1816, Mr. Cole and Major Un- 
derhill started with their families and such goods and supplies as they might re- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 21 

quire in their new hemes, with six teams and sleighs, three to each family. The 
party contained twenty people. After spending six weeks on the road, including a 
five days rest at Avery, the old county seat, they reached Major Underbill's place 
on the 22d of February, 1816. The Huron river was then so high that Mr. Cole 
could not cross with his family and teams to his own house, so he took them to the 
home of Dr. Pierce and soon afterward purchased the place and remained there as 
long as he lived. In 1818 Mr. Cole took a prominent part in the movement which 
culminated in the removal of the county seat to Norwalk. On February 9, 1820, 
Mr. Cole was engaged in hauling a large saw log and one of his legs, owing to an 
accident in unloading, was caught between the logs and so terribly crushed that 
he died two days afterward. 

Levi and Hannah Cole had several children, of whom the following is a brief 
record: Colonel Asher Cole, the second son, was married January 6, 1828, to Nar- 
cissa Lawrence and they had a son, Asher, who was born November 12, 1828, and 
on October 19, 1859, married Miss Sarah J. Purdy. He died May 29, 1885, leav- 
ing a widow and seven children. 

Miner Cole, the fifth son, was born July 26, 1803, in Herkimer county, New 
York, where he received his school training. In 1816 he came to Huron county, 
Ohio, with his father, making his home on a farm of one hundred acres in Norwalk 
township. In addition to his elementary education he attended Norwalk Academy 
for one term and further improved his mind by home study and close observation 
of men and events. On July 30, 1840, he married Miss Mary A. Allen, of Rip- 
ley township, born November 7, 1819, a daughter of Hiram Allen, of near Utica, 
New York. After his marriage Miner Cole continued to engage in general agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, which occurred August 20, 1885. He was a re- 
publican in politics and served his township faithfully as a trustee. 

Asher M. Cole, the only son of Miner Cole, was born November 19, 1843, on 
the farm in Norwalk township which he now owns and occupies. He attended the 
public schools of the neighborhood and at the same time was trained to the work 
of the farm under his father's direction. He was twenty years of age when in re- 
sponse to the country's call for troops he offered his services to the government 
and was mustered in on the 15th of May, 1864, as a member of Company B, One 
Hundred and Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was first engaged on gar- 
rison duty at Arlington Heights, where he remained until September of the same 
year when his term of enlistment expired and he was honorably discharged. Prior 
to joining the United States Volunteer army he served for some time with the 
Home Guards. 

On the 5th of March, 1869, Asher M. Cole was married to Miss Louisa E. 
Channing, who was born in Somersetshire, England, November 21, 1846, and at 
the age of five years was brought to Huron county, Ohio, where her youthful days 
were spent upon a farm. They had one child, Miner A. Cole, born August 26, 
1880. During the same year they adopted a bright little boy of six years, named 
Orill Allen, a distant relative. Miner A. Cole, the son, was married May 11, 1902, 
to Miss Elizabeth M. Fisher, whose birth occurred May 2, 1886. They have a 
charming little daughter, Verna Louise K. Cole. Orill A. Cole, the legally adopted 
son, married Miss Carrie Cassady, who was educated at Akron, Ohio. She is a 
daughter of Frank and Sarah Cassady, and has two children, Winfred Elizabeth 



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22 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

and Allen Cassady. Orill A. Cole occupies a fine position in Toronto, Canada, and 
is making steady progress in the business world. 

With the exception of the time which he spent as a soldier in the Civil war, 
Asher M. Cole remained upon the home farm with his parents until he reached 
his majority, at which time his father gave him a team and some farming tools, 
and he then began operating the old homestead. He was there busily employed in 
carrying on general agricultural pursuits until 1881, when he rented a farm, pay- 
ing five hundred dollars per year, for a term of five years, and also taking care of 
his father in his declining days, or until the father's demise. After the expiration 
of his lease Asher M. Cole became sole owner of the beautiful homestead prop- 
erty of one hundred and twenty-five acres, lying just outside the corporation limits 
of Norwalk. His son is now operating the farm and living at home with his 
parents. 

Mr. Cole has always been interested in the cause of education and for several 
terms has acceptably served as a member of the school board. He has been a suc- 
cessful farmer and a most useful and well known representative of Huron county's 
broad minded citizens. Both he and his wife are members of the Universalist 
church and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. His life has at 
all times been an upright one and he is justly accounted among the most honored 
and respected citizens of Norwalk towinship. 



HARRY H. AND WILLARD E. MARSH. 

Harry H. and Willard E. Marsh are successfully engaged in the conduct of 
a dry goods establishment in Norwalk under the firm style of The Marsh Com- 
pany. Their paternal grandparents were Abram Reynolds and Sarah L. Marsh, 
the former born at Rahway, New Jersey, on the 8th of July, 1800, while the 
latter's birth occurred in Orange, New Jersey, March 8, 1802. After coming 
to this state Abram R. Marsh made his home for many years on a farm in Ridge- 
field township, Huron county, and was more than ninety years of age when called 
to his final rest. For a long period he acted as an elder in the Presbyterian 
church, the teachings of which he exemplified in his daily life, his upright and 
honorable career winning him the regard and admiration of all with whom he was 
associated. 

The maternal grandfather of H. H. and W. E. Marsh was Jonas Hinkley, 
who was born in Elizabethtown, Essex county, New York, September 21, 1816, 
and accompanied his parents on their removal to Huron, Ohio, in 1841. He and 
his brother, Philander Hinkley, were awarded the contract for the construction 
of the first railroad through Huron and he was also engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits there for several years. The year of 1859 witnessed his arrived in Nor- 
walk and during the period of his residence here he devoted his time and energies 
to perfecting a number of practical and useful inventions which had long occu- 
pied his attention and which he eventually succeeded in patenting. He was a 
man of considerable inventive genius and one of the most expert mechanics in 
the country and was the originator of a sewing machine which was afterward 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 25 

manufactured in Norwalk by the firm of Hinkley & Wildman. He realized quite 
a fortune through his invention of the first knitting machine for the knitting of 
hosiery — a machine that was manufactured at Biddeford, Maine. Many other 
useful, valuable and original devices were the outcome of his mechanical skill 
and ingenuity, including a carpet sweeper. He was a great reader of books and 
papers bearing upon mechanics and sciences and his wonderful mind was wholly 
absorbed in study and investigation along these lines. Though quiet and retiring 
in disposition, he was very entertaining in manner and speech and his genial, 
kindly nature made him popular with a large circle of friends. His demise oc- 
curred when he had reached the ripe old age of seventy-five years. 

'Charles E. Marsh, the father of the gentlemen whose names initiate this 
review, was born in Coshocton, Ohio, on the 28th of August, 1840, and was one 
of a large family of children. In i860 he made his way to Norwalk, securing 
a clerkship in the dry goods house of Beardsley & Brother, with whom he con- 
tinued until 1862, when he enlisted for service in the Union army as a member 
of the One Hundred and First Ohio Infantry. His health failing, however, he 
was eventually honorably discharged on account of physical disability. Return- 
ing to Norwalk, he again entered the employ of Beardsley & Brother and sub- 
sequently worked in a clerical capacity for Watson & Lovrien and Wooster & Pat- 
rick. In 1872, feeling that his training and experience in mercantile lines justi- 
fied him in starting out in business life on his own account, he established a dry 
goods store in association with Mrs. S. B. Pease. In 1880 the style of the firm 
was changed to Marsh & Jackson and in 1887 became known as Marsh & Blox- 
ham, thus continuing until the death of the partners, Mr. Marsh passing away on 
the 21st of June, 1906, while A. T. Bloxham died in the following November. 
Mr. Marsh was probably one of the best salesmen and judges of dry goods in 
the country. He established his mercantile enterprise on borrowed capital but 
as the years went by won a most gratifying measure of prosperity as the result 
of his well directed and untiring energy, guided by sound judgment and keen 
discrimination. Brooking no obstacles that honest effort could overcome, he 
steadily worked his way upward until he gained a place among the leading mer- 
chants of the county. His personal characteristics, too, were such as commanded 
the admiration and respect of all with whom he came in contact and in Norwalk, 
where he made his home for almost a half century, he was well known and highly 
esteemed as one of its most honored residents. 

On the 7th of February, 1866, Charles E. Marsh was united in marriage to 
Miss Ellen A. Hinkley, a daughter of Jonas Hinkley, who was of Scotch de- 
scent. The birth of Mrs. Marsh occurred in 1844, and by her marriage she 
became the mother of four children, all of whom obtained their preliminary edu- 
cation in Norwalk. Harry H. is the eldest son of the family. Charles R., who 
attended business college at Poughkeepsie, New York, and also a military school 
at Roslyn, Long Island, is now a manufacturer of wire specialties in Cleve- 
land. As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life he chose Miss Alice 
Widlar. Willard E. is the next in order of birth. Lewis C, the youngest son of 
Charles E. and Ellen A. (Hinkley) Marsh, was called to his final rest in 1898. 

Harry H. Marsh completed his education in a private school at Buffalo and 
is now at the head of the extensive dry goods enterprise established by his father, 



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26 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

the business being at present conducted under the name of The Marsh Com- 
pany. The house enjoys an extensive and profitable patronage, owing to its 
straightforward and reliable business policy. In 1891 was celebrated the mar- 
riage of H. H. Marsh and Miss Clara C. Poor, a daughter of Richard D. Poor, 
of old New England stock. By this union there are two children, Richard C. 
and Irene C. 

When a lad of sixteen years Willard E. Marsh took up the study of photog- 
raphy and for thirteen years remained a successful representative of that art. 
Since the death of his father, however, he has been associated with his brother 
in the conduct and management of the Marsh dry goods establishment and, 
like his brother, is recognized throughout the community as a most substantial, 
enterprising and progressive business man and citizen. On the 26th of October, 
1906, he wedded Miss Bessie M. Watts, a daughter of Joseph Watts, of Oak- 
harbor, Ohio. They have a little daughter, Asenath R., born June 24, 1908. 



AMOS K. EASTMAN. 



Amos K. Eastman, who is well known in agricultural circles, owning and culti- 
vating eighty-eight acres of good land in Peru township, is numbered among the 
native sons of the county, his biith having occurred March 9, 1884, in the house 
in which he now resides. He is a son of Elbridge G. E. Eastman, who was born 
in Bronson township, Huron county, April 17, 1838. He has always remained a 
resident of Ohio and is now living in Richland county. He is a son of Seba A. 
Eastman, who came from Vermont and settled in Crawford county, Ohio. About 
1835 he removed to Greenfield township, Huron county, and was identified with 
farming interests in this locality until his death, which occurred in Peru township 
in 1850. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Mary Jane Ken- 
dall and came from New York to Ohio with her parents, Amos and Mary J. 
(Richy) Kendall, the family settling in Peru township about 1848. Mrs. Eastman 
is still living at the age of sixty-three years, her birth having occurred June 9, 
1846. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Elbridge Eastman were born four children, namely: 
Effie G., who married J. W. Billiard, of Seneca county, Ohio; Grace, who mar- 
ried Henry Sulser, of Marion county, Ohio, and had four children, Cleo, Kasia, 
Garry, and Bernice, who has passed away. Garry E., residing with his parents, 
who married Ida Bocse, by Whom he has the following children : Wayne. Gladys, 
Alice and Bernice and Amos K., of this review. 

Amos K. Eastman has always resided upon the farm which is now his home, 
his father having purchased the property from Laurence Ott. Since the son came 
into possession of the place he has made a number of substantial improvements 
tRereon and his farm is regarded as one of the desirable properties of the county. 
He is diligent, persistent and practical in all that he undertakes and has been quite 
successful in cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil and climate. Throughout 
his entire life he has engaged in farming and his broad practical experience and 
undaunted energy make him a leading agriculturist of the community. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 27 

Amos K. Eastman was united in marriage to Elnora M. Smith, a daughter of 
Ambrose and Libby (Shild) Smith, of Peru township, the wedding being cele- 
brated on the 4th of June, 1908. They now have a little daughter, Elizabeth Jane 
Lola, born on the 6th of July, 1909. Mr. Eastman is a member of the Knights of 
the Maccabees, belonging to the tent at Ncrwalk. Both he and his wile have a wide 
circle of warm friends in the community and are popular among those who know 
them. 



THOMAS J. BROWN. 



Thomas J. Brown, a prosperous farmer and stock man of Clarksfield town- 
ship, was born March 16, 1848, in Sherman township, Huron county, and is the 
son of William and Elizabeth (Greer) Brown, the former of whom was born in 
Geneva, Seneca county, New York, but came as a small child with his parents to 
Ohio. Thomas H. Brown, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
of Irish birth and came to this country at the age of seventeen. He was the eld- 
est of a family of twenty-three children, his father having been twice married, 
and having by his first wife six, and by his second seventeen children, all of whom 
lived to young manhood and young womanhood. On coming to this country, 
the family settled first in Baltimore, Maryland, which they forsook after a few 
years for Seneca, New York. Later John and Thomas H. Brown came to Ohio, 
locating in Ashland county, near Jeromesville, where the latter lived until he was 
nearly eighty years of age. He engaged in farming and stock raising and feed- 
ing, and became a large landowner, many of his tracts being situated in other 
townships. During the war of 1812, he served as a soldier, and at one time made 
the journey from Cleveland to Old Portland, now Sandusky, in a row boat. He 
died at McComb, from the results of an accidental injury, at the advanced age 
of ninety-nine years. He had been a man of means, interested and prominent 
in all public affairs. 

His son, William, the father of Thomas J. Brown, was born in Seneca county, 
New York, and came to Huron county, Ohio, prior to his marriage. Here he 
engaged in general farming and stock raising and became an influential man in 
his community. For a number of years, he was treasurer of Norwich township, 
his home at the time, and he also served as township trustee and as a member of 
the school board for a long period He and his family belonged to the United 
Brethren church, the Union chapel congregation or class of which denomination 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown has helped to establish. In fact when Mrs. Brown died, 
April 10, 1908, the last of the original charter members had passed away. Mr. 
Brown had died eight years previously, at about the age of seventy-seven, six 
years younger than his wife when she responded to the call of death. Both hus- 
band and wife are buried in Norwich cemetery. In the affairs of Union chapel, 
Mr. Brown ever took an active part and was one of its trustees from its organi- 
zation until his death. He was an upright man, whose influence was strongly 
felt in the community in which he lived. He was a soldier of the Civil war, en- 
listing in Company H, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
He had a family of five sons: Thomas J., James E., Franklin H., William L., and 



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28 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

one who died in infancy. Those living are all farmers and prominent in their re- 
spective localities. 

Thomas J. Brown spent his boyhood and young manhood on his father's farm, 
receiving his education in the district schools of the county and in Milan Acad- 
emy and the schools at Clyde and Geneva, Ohio. His own schooling completed, 
he engaged in teaching during the winter months in the schools of Seneca and 
Huron counties. During the summer, he worked on the farm. At the age of 
twenty-three, he engaged in mercantile business at Havana, Norwich township, 
to which he devoted his time for about two and a half years, after which he re- 
turned to farming in Norwich township, which was his home until March 10, 
1904, when he removed to Clarksfield township. During these years, he has pur- 
sued a general line of agriculture and has also engaged in the breeding of short 
horn cattle. In the latter work, he has attained quite a reputation beyond the 
township borders, for his animals are shipped to distant markets, where they are 
recognized as being of fine, pure breed, and many stockmen have bred cattle 
from his stock. He also raises silver Wyandotte poultry, of a high order. His 
farm, one hundred acres in extent, is under a fine state of cultivation and gives 
rich returns for the labor expended upon it. 

On the 23d of October, 1873, Mr. Brown was married to Mrs. Jennie Knoles, 
the widow of Smith Knoles and the daughter of Dennis Downing, of Penn Yan, 
New York, but who at the time of her marriage was living in Seneca county, 
Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have had no children of their own but have taken 
three children of other families into their home, and have given them all the edu- 
cational opportunities and advantages that they would give to their own offspring. 

In politics, Mr. Brown has been rather independent. For twenty years he 
voted the prohibition ticket, but of late years has voted for whatever men and 
measures appealed to his idea of right. He has always shown a great interest 
in public matters, and never fails to exercise his right of franchise, but he has 
never sought an office at the disposition of the people. He keeps well posted on 
all matters of general concern and is well able to defend his position, taken after 
he has convinced himself of its justness, against all opposition. In religious mat- 
ters, he gives his allegiance to the Congregational church, in which he holds the 
position of deacon. In the Sunday school, he is a teacher and assistant superin- 
tendent, for he has ever shown a deep concern for the progress of the work of 
the church and the school. 



LOUIE SCHICK. 



Louie Schick, successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ridgefield town- 
ship, Huron county, was born in Germany on the 19th of May, 1870, and is a 
son of Peter and Wilhelmina Schick. The parents, who were also natives of the 
fatherland, came to the United States in 1883 and settled in Milan, Ohio, where 
they resided for about six months. On the 1st of March of the following year, 
they removed to Ridgefield township, Huron county, where the father purchased 
thirty-eight acres of land, which is still in his possession. He and his wife be- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 29 

came the parents of four children, namely: William; Jacob; Wilhelmina, the 
wife of Henry Klein ; and Louie, of this review. Both parents still survive while 
the father who devoted his life to farming pursuits now lives retired, enjoying in 
well earned rest the fruits of his former toil. 

Louie Schick spent the years of his boyhood and youth under the parental 
roof, acquiring his education in the district schools, while the periods of vaca- 
tion were devoted to the work ot the fields. After laying aside his text-books, 
however, he became identified with railroading, being employed upon the work 
train for four years, and he also spent some time in the boiler shop. Later he 
severed his connection with the railroad business and resumed agricultural pur- 
suits, renting a farm of fifty-two acres, which he continues to operate and upon 
which he makes his home. He owns thirteen acres of land which, in connection 
with his father's farm, he also cultivates. He is up-to-date and progressive in 
his methods, carrying on his business along strictly modern lines, while his various 
interests, carefully managed and directed, are bringing to him gratifying returns. 

Mr. Schick has been twice married. In 1899, he wedded Miss Bertha Bower, 
a daughter of William Bower, of this county, who was a native of Germany. Unto 
this union was born one daughter, Louisa. The wife and mother was called away 
to her final rest in 1905, while two years later, in 1907, Mr. Schick married Miss 
Louisa Bower, a sister of his former wife. He is a member of the German Luth- 
eran church and is public-spirited in his citizenship, lending his aid to all measures 
and movements which have for their object the substantial and permanent develop- 
ment and upbuilding of the community. Honorable and upright in all of his deal- 
ings, he has won the respect and confidence of those with whom he is associated, 
and he is held in high regard by a large circle of warm friends. 



O. C. LITZKEY. 



O. C. Litzkey, as superintendent of the Bellevue water works, is well known 
here and the record which he has made in all official business relations, has won 
him the unqualified respect and confidence of his fellow townsmen. He is 
numbered among Ohio's native sons for his birth occurred in Fremont on the 
16th of July, 1864, his parents being John and Minnie (Nash) Litzkey, both of 
whom were natives of Germany, who,. coming to America, spent their last days 
in this country, the father dying at the age of sixty-five years, while the mother 
passed away at the age of sixty-seven. They were the parents of ten children: 
Tillie, deceased; Lizzie, the wife of Dan McGrady; Lena, John and Mary, all of 
whom have passed away ; and four who died in infancy. 

The other member of the family is O. C. Litzkey, whose name introduces this 
record. He was reared in the place of his nativity and, spending his boyhood 
days under the parental roof, was afforded the opportunities for the acquirement 
of an education in the public schools. In the periods of vacation, he worked 
upon the farm and after putting aside his text-books, he gave his time and ener- 
gies to farm work and also was employed at the Ohio Cultivator Plant at Fre- 
mont, where he filled the responsible position of foreman of the shipping depart- 



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30 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ment. After the removal of the plant to Bellevue, he came to this city and re- 
tained his position in connection with that corporation a quarter of a century. 
No higher testimonial of his faithfulness, capability and of the confidence reposed 
in him could be given than the fact that he was associated with the business in 
the responsible position of foreman for twenty-five years. He resigned on his 
appointment as superintendent of the water works, January 6, 1909, and he is 
now serving in that capacity. 

At Fremont on the 29th of June, 1886, Mr. Litzkey was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Hilt, a daughter of Peter Hik, of that place. They became the 
parents of two children, but lost the first born, Anna, at the age of two years. 
The surviving daughter, Lula, is at home. The parents are members of the Luth- 
eran church and Mr. Litzkey is widely and prominently known in fraternal cir- 
cles. He is now acting as treasurer of the Forester lodge, is treasurer and one 
of the trustees of the Eagle lodge and is a member of the German Beneficial 
Union and the German Aid Society. These latter indicate the broad humanitar- 
ian spirit which actuates him in all his relations with his fellowmen. His politi- 
cal allegiance is given to the democracy and for ten years, he served as a member 
of the city council, exercising his official prerogatives in support of many meas- 
ures for the public good. He has ever advocated retrenchment in public expen- 
diture yet never to the extent of blocking progress or excluding needed public 
improvements. In his present office, he is giving an administration that is char- 
acterized by system so that there is no loss of time, labor or material. His course 
is receiving uniform commendation and he well deserves classification with the 
public officials of whom Bellevue has had reason to be proud. 



CALEB F. JACKSON. 



Without invidious distinction, Caleb F. Jackson may be termed the foremost 
business man of Norwalk from the fact that his interests are most varied as well 
as extensive. Starting out in life on a humble financial plane, he has steadily 
worked his way upward and his careful management, coupled with unfaltering in- 
dustry and keen discernment, have brought him to the position which he now 
occupies. Honored and respected by all there is no resident of Norwalk who 
fills a more enviable place in the commercial and financial circles of the city. He 
was born June 25, 1854, upon the old Jackson farm a mile and a half south of 
Norwalk, upon the old state road. His parents were Charles and Alberta (Fitch) 
Jackson and he is a great-grandson of Colonel Giles Jackson of Berkshire county, 
Massachusetts, who won fame as a colonel of infantry in the Revolutionary war 
and as chief of staff to Major General Gates he penned the article of surrender 
at Yorktown and Saratoga. The original articles of convention for the sur- 
render of Burgoyne at Saratoga, October 16, 1877, signed by J. Burgoyne and 
Horatio Gates, are now in possession of C. F. Jackson at Norwalk, having been 
inherited by the "second son" for three generations. Numerous other histori- 
cal Revolutionary papers of great value are preserved to be handed down to 
the second son, Thayer Elden Jackson. Charles Jackson, the father of our sub- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 33 

ject, was a prominent farmer of Norwalk township, who spent six years of his 
•early manhood in the employ of Shepherd Patrick as a salesman in his general 
store at Norwalk. Subsequently, he bought the Jackson farm homestead, which 
remained in the family for sixty years and his capable management of his busi- 
ness interests, placed him with the substantial agriculturists of Huron county. 

Caleb F. Jackson attended the country school in Norwalk, district Np. 3, until 
he prepared to enter high school in 1868. He was graduated therefrom in 1871 
on the completion of a complete scientific and classical course of study. He had 
expected to study medicine, but the death of both parents left him the care of two 
sisters and a younger brother, a financial burden which made further study in 
school or college impossible. At the age of seventeen years, he began work 
in the dry-goods, grocery and drug store of Wooster & Patrick as "boy of all 
work," entering their employ on the 13th of November, 1871. Within three 
months, he was made a salesman and promotions followed rapidly. In 1873, ne 
was head salesman in the drygoods department on a salary of a thousand dollars 
per year, which at that date was the largest salary paid any salesman in Nor- 
walk — and he was not yet twenty years of age. In January, 1874, at the age of 
nineteen and a half years, he formed a copartnership with L. C. Prescott and pur- 
chased a drug and grocery store at Flint, Michigan. The firm of Prescott & 
Jackson possessed but twelve hundred dollars, but they had energy, determination 
and perseverance. They assumed a, debt of five thousand dollars and after two 
years, with all the indebtedness discharged, C. F. Jackson sold his interests to his 
partner and returned to Norwalk to enter the employ of C. E. Marsh & Company, 
as salesman and manager of the interests of Mrs. S. P. Pease in the firm. His 
next advanced step was made in 1881, when he joined C. E. Marsh in organizing 
the firm of Marsh & Jackson for the purpose of opening a dry-goods and carpet 
store at No. 11 West Main street. Great financial success followed this venture 
for five years and in 1886 Mr. Jackson sold his interests to his partner and went 
to Minneapolis, Minnesota. In that growing city, he established the "Jackson 
Black Goods Store" which became known throughout the northwest as special- 
izing in every known article of dry goods, black or white. Mr. Jackson was sole 
owner of the Minneapolis business and in seven years, had sufficient capital to 
warrant the stocking of a department store, which he could foresee at that early 
date, was the coming mercantile establishment of this country. 

In the winter of 1892-3 Mr. Jackson, in partnership with H. H. Hoyt of Nor- 
walk, purchased from the First Methodist Episcopal church of this city, their 
church property at the corner of Main street and Benedict avenue. In May, 
1893, tne °ld church was demolished to make room for the beautiful five-story 
brick and brown stone building known as The Glass Block. The building when 
complete, was leased to the Hoyt & Jackson Company, a corporation of which 
C. F. Jackson was the president, for a department store and was opened to the 
public November 29, 1893. This marked the beginning of a new era in mercantile 
affairs in Norwalk. In that day the department store was untried, except in the 
large cities and in Norwalk it was looked upon as a venturesome undertaking, 
which would probably result in failure. Mr. Jackson's perceptions of the busi- 
ness future, were much keener than the old-school merchants and instead of 
failure, the business was a great success and for sixteen years has paid its stock- 



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34 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

holders splendid dividends every year. In October, 1895, Mr. Jackson purchased 
his partner's interest in the Glass Block real estate and became sole owner of thiy 
valuable property. He also secured Mr. Hoyt's interest in the mercantile company 
and immediately changed the corporate name to The C. F. Jackson Company, 
which is so well known in the business world today. 

Even after acquiring this valuable property, Mr. Jackson's ambition was not 
satisfied, for in 1902, he secured the first Glass Block Annex by a lease of a 
three-story brick block adjoining on the west, thereby increasing the floor space 
and obtaining better facilities to handle the vast growing trade. The business 
has been conducted on a cash basis with a fixed price and to these rules and the 
straightforward principles which have governed his commercial affairs, the suc- 
cess of Mr. Jackson is due. In 1904, in order to utilize surplus earnings, Mr. Jack- 
son bought for the company a business block at Findlay, Ohio, for one hundred 
and thirty thousand dollars and established at that point a second Glass Block 
department store larger and more beautiful than the original store at Norwalk. 
His eldest son, Edward E. Jackson, was made vice-president of the company and 
general manager at Findlay. The success of the store at that place has been be- 
yond the expectations of even its projector. In December, 1908, a second annex 
was added at Norwalk, comprising three floors with a frontage of sixty feet on 
Benedict avenue, giving the Norwalk store a total of ninety thousand square 
feet of sales room or nearly two and a half acres — a monument to the business 
foresight and executive ability of its founder. In addition to the general man- 
agement of these great mercantile establishments, Mr. Jackson is interested in 
numerous manufacturing and business enterprises to which he devotes a por- 
tion of his time. He is president of the Norwalk Vault Company, vice-president 
of the Auto Buggy Company, treasurer of the Miller Anchor Company, a direc- 
tor of the Local Telephone Company, of the Interstate Ice Company and the 
Tinker Concrete Company, while in numerous other concerns, he is a stockholder, 
giving him diversified interests probably not exceeded by those of any other busi- 
ness man in Norwalk. For two years he has been the president of the Norwalk 
Chamber of Commerce, a strong organization of business men, looking after the 
welfare and prosperity of Norwalk's business interests. 

On the nth of November, 1874, Mr. Jackson was married to Miss Mary L. 
Stevens, of Norwalk and unto them have been born four children: Edward 
Everett, who was born January 2, 1876, and was married at Findlay, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 1, 1905, to Miss Glenna Weil; Thayer Elden, born June 19. 1884; Ken- 
neth Seymour, born July 9, 1886; and Hortense lone, born March 16, 1891. 

Mr. Jackson is not only well known because of the extent and importance of 
his business affairs, but also by reason of his co-operation in many interests and 
measures which relate to the individual or public welfare. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the Knight Templar degree, to the 
Knights of Pythias lodge, the Royal Arcanum, the Knights of the Maccabees and 
the National Union. He is a member of the Ohio Sons of the American Revo- 
lution and was for many years a member of the Shakespeare Club, Norwalk's 
leading literary and social club. He is likewise a liberal supporter of the Pres- 
byterian church and for many years has served on its board of trustees. He has 
never become actively connected with politics or aspired to public office. He is 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 35 

rather retiring in disposition, but most public-spirited and in a quiet and un- 
ostentatious way, has devoted much time and money to the public good. He 
finds his pleasure in his elegant home and his close, enduring friends and he de- 
serves in the largest degree the respect and confidence as well as the success, 
which have been accorded him. 



MILO F. JOHNSON. 



Milo F. Johnson, a progressive and prosperous farmer of Norwalk town- 
ship, was born in Peru township, July 21, 1859. His birth occurred on the old 
homestead farm taken up by his grandfather, Marcus Johnson, in the early part 
of the eighteenth century, which property is yet owned by one of his daughters, 
Mrs. Delia M. Linder. He is a son of Luther B. Johnson, who was born on the 
1st of November, 1822, in Elba, Genesee county, New York. He came west to 
Ohio with his parents, when eighteen months of age, settling on the old home- 
stead farm in 1824. This continued to be his place of residence until 1888/ when 
he retired from active life and came to Norwalk, where he passed away in April, 
1905, at a ripe old age. The wife preceded him to the great beyond in May, 
1895. He belonged to the Universalist church and was a stanch republican in 
politics. A successful and substantial farmer, he devoted his entire efforts to that 
line of activity, and, though quiet and unassuming in manner, was well known 
and honored for his strict integrity and his loyalty to the general good, doing 
all in his power to further the growth and upbuilding of the community in which 
he lived. His family consisted of three children, namely: Milo F., of this re- 
view; Delia M., who passed away in August, 1909; and Mrs. Alma E. Call, of 
Williams county, Ohio. 

Reared on the old homestead farm, Milo F. Johnson pursued his education 
in the district schools of Peru township and spent the years of his boyhood and 
youth under the parental roof. Upon attaining his majority, he decided to adopt 
as his life work the occupation to which he had been reared and has since been 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, with the exception of three years, when con- 
nected with the Ohio Metal Company. He has a finely improved place, equipped 
with good barns and outbuildings and all latest devices and equipments for fa- 
cilitating the work of the farm. He is progressive and up-to-date in his methods 
and has attained a creditable degree of prosperity in his agricultural pursuits. 

On the 24th of October, 1888, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss 
Sadie E. Nicholson, and they have become the parents of one daughter, Helen 
B., born February 24, 1897. Mrs. Johnson is the daughter of William Nicholson, 
of Mansfield, Ohio, and is one of a family of six children. The father was born 
in England and came to Mansfield when twenty-three years of age. He had 
been a grocer in his native land and continued to engage in that line in th'is 
country. He passed away in 1887. His wife, who was also born in England, was 
brought by her parents to America when six weeks old. Her father, Charles 
Hutchinson, on his arrival in the United States, came direct to Huron county 



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36 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

where he settled on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Perry township, 
which is still in the family. 

Mr. Johnson's church affiliations are with the Presbyterians, and he has 
given stalwart support to the republican party since age conferred upon him the 
right of franchise. He has served as township trustee for seven years and is 
still the incumbent in that office. Mr. Johnson has not only been industrious, but 
has evidenced in his transactions those qualities which make friends, and, being 
upright in all of his dealings and interested in the moral as well as the financial 
welfare of the community, he enjoys the confidence and respect of all who 
know him. 



LEANDER L. DOUD. 



Leander L. Doud, secretary of the A. B. Chase Company and thus con- 
nected with the manufacturing interests of Norwalk, is well known by reason 
of his activities in behalf of the best interests of the community, his influence 
always being on the side of right, justice, progress and improvement. 

He is a descendent of Henry Doud, who came from Surrey county, England, 
in 1639, with a colony under the Rev. Henry Whitfield and settled in Guilford, 
Connecticut. His ancestry also traces back to the Tallmans, prominently identi- 
fied with the history of Connecticut, Governor Tallman being one of the early 
governors of that state. 

Mr. Doud was born in Huron county, Ohio, May 20, 1838, a son of Samuel 
and Philura (Niles) Doud, who were natives of New York and Vermont re- 
spectively. The paternal grandfather, Solomon Doud, was born in Connecticut 
and in 1823, after living some time in the Empire state, came to Huron county, 
settling in Greenwich township, where he made the first clearing and built him a 
house at the center of the township. The journey westward was made by way 
of the lakes to Sandusky, and thence with ox-teams through the woods to their 
destination. Samuel Doud was at that time a lad of ten years and through the 
period of his boyhood and youth he assisted as best he could in the arduous task 
of developing the new country, frequently clearing land on his own account. He 
boasted of the fact that he bought his farm of one hundred and six acres in the 
southeast corner of Greenwich township with his ax. Here, having cleared off 
a few acres of the timber and building a log cabin, he married Miss Philura 
Niles, a young school teacher from Vermont. A few years later he built one of the 
first colonial homes in that section of the county and here reared his family, Lean- 
der L. Doud, the subject of this sketch, being the eldest of six children. In 1868 
the father removed to New London, Huron county, adjoining the corporation on 
the south. He was one of the influential and enterprising men of the commun- 
ity where he lived, took a prominent place in the business circles, acting for 
some time as director and vice-president of the New London National Bank, 
while in other connections his labors constituted an important element in the 
business activity of the district. He was a highly respected man, whose integrity 
was one of the salient points in his career. He was a leading and valued mem- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 39 

ber ot, and local preacher in the Methodist church. The last year of his life 
was devoted to the building of the present brick Methodist Episcopal church in 
New London, which he lived to see completed and paid for, taking up the last 
note a few days before his death, which occurred December 20, 1880. 

Leander L. Doud acquired his early education in the country schools of this 
state, taught five seasons, and received his later education in the Norwalk Semin- 
ary, Savannah Academy, Baldwin University at Berea, Ohio, and the Ohio 
Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio. At the latter college it was his good 
fortune to come under the direct influence of the late Bishop McCabe as a fel- 
low student, and of Bishop Thompson, then president of the institution. In his 
early twenties, Mr. Doud was engaged with his father in extensive stock-raising 
and wool-growing business, selling their products in the eastern markets of 
Boston and New York. 

On September 10, 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Bloom 
Eberly, a teacher in the public schools of Wood county, Ohio, and established his 
home on a farm in Greenwich township. Of their four children, two — Philura 
Semeramis and Ida Winifred — died in early childhood. A daughter, Louie 
Naomi, and a son, Harry Lea, are living, the latter an attorney of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

In 1866 Mr. Doud removed to New London, Ohio, where together with Al- 
bert White, he built the town hall block and engaged in merchandising for eight 
years, acting also as postmaster for several years. It was here that he formed 
the acquaintance of Captain A. B. Chase, who later became the founder and 
president of the company that bears his name. In 1875 ne removed to Norwalk, 
Ohio, and joined with A. B. Chase and others in organizing the A. B. Chase Com- 
pany for the manufacture of musical instruments. Being a charter member, 
Mr. Doud became its first secretary and treasurer and has continued as secretary 
and general manager to the present time. He has seen the business grow and 
prosper until it is one of the most important in Huron county, second to none of 
its kind in the state, with the highest reputation for organs, pianos and player- 
pianos that is world wide. His keen discrimination, his capable management and 
his undaunted enterprise have been salient features in its success. He has been 
watchful of all the details pointing to the growth and perfection of the business 
and has ever maintained a high standard in the character of the output, in the 
personnel of the house and in the nature of the service rendered to the public. 
In 1880 Mr. Doud built the Doud block, now the Maccabee Temple, at Nor- 
walk, Ohio, and in 1882 erected his brick residence on West Main street. 

Mr. Doud is an active Methodist and an enthusiastic Sunday-school worker. 
At the age of fifteen, soon after uniting with the church, he was elected secre- 
tary of the local Sunday school, and has held official relations with the church and 
Sunday school ever since. He was Sunday-school superintendent for over twenty- 
five years, frequently in the early days, superintending his home school in the 
morning and one in the country in the afternoon. He was for many years sec- 
retary or president of the Huron County Sunday School Association, president 
of the Huron county branch of the American Bible Society, and has for many 
years conducted a large adult Bible class in the Norwalk Methodist Sunday 
school. 



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40 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Doud has acted as trustee of Baldwin University, Berea, Ohio, and of 
the Lakeside Association. He is a steward and trustee of the Norwaik Methodist 
Episcopal church, and was secretary of the building committee when their new 
stone edifice was erected. 

In 1904 he was a delegate to the' World's Fourth International Sunday school 
convention, which met at Jerusalem, and while abroad visited many points of 
ancient and modern historic interest. Being a keen observer, he profited by the 
knowledge which he gained concerning the social and religious work of the old 
world. Mr. Doud was a delegate also to the International Sunday School con- 
vention at Toronto, Canada, in 1907. He has been an extensive traveler, his 
business relations having taken him into nearly every state in the Union, and his 
vacation trips including Canada, Cuba, Mexico and countries of Europe, Asia 
and Africa. He is a well read man, a good writer on the subjects which he dis- 
cusses and an original and strong thinker, and a man of high moral character. 
Realizing that the purposes of life are manifold and that the interests of the in- 
dividual should touch many lines, he has not confined his attention to business 
affairs alone, but has been an interested and liberal supporter of education, of 
temperance, of church work, and in fact all movements for the general good. 



GEORGE A. NICOLLS. 



George A. Nicolls, residing on his well improved and valuable farm of one 
hundred and seventy acres in Bronson township, has been successfully identi- 
fied with general agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career. 
His birth occurred in Cayuga county, New York, on the 30th of October, 1829, 
his parents being John and Sarah (Peck) Nicolls, the latter a native of Mas- 
sachusetts. The paternal grandfather of our subject was William Nicolls, who 
served all thrcugh the Revolutionary war of 1776, and the maternal grandfather, 
Abijah Peck, served in the war of 1812 with the rank of major. John Nicolls, 
the father of Gecrge A. Nicolls, likewise did duty as a soldier in the war of 1812, 
serving throughout the entire conflict. In the year 1837, he brought his wife 
and children to Huron county, Ohio, the family home being established in Bron- 
son township. This part of the state was still largely wild and undeveloped and 
he found it necessary to clear the land of the timber before it could be utilized 
for farming purposes. Unto him and his wife were born eight children, namely : 
Seymour, who died in infancy ; William ; Ray ; Levina ; Samantha ; John ; Abijah 
and George A. 

George A. Nicolls, who was but a little lad of eight years when he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to this county, early became familiar with the 
duties and labors which fall to the lot of the agriculturist through the assistance 
which he rendered his father in the opening up and development of the latter's 
farm. Throughout his entire business career, he has devoted his time and ener- 
gies to the work of general farming, in which he has won a substantial meas- 
ure of success, being most practical and progressive in his methods. He is the 
owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and seventv acres in Bronson town- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 41 

ship, where he resides and is well entitled to be classed with the substantial and 
representative citizens of the community. He is one of the stockholders in the 
Sandusky, Norwalk and Mansfield Railroad. 

On the ioth of March, 1870, Mr. Nicolls was united in marriage to Miss Cla- 
rissa Burnap, a daughter of Job and Olive Burnap. Sarah and Mary, the two 
daughters born of this union, are now deceased. 

Mr. Nicolls is a firm believer in the principles of the republican party and al- 
ways casts his ballot in support of its men and measures. He has now been a 
resident of this county for seventy-two years and is therefore thoroughly familiar 
with its annuals from a pioneer period down to the present time, having not only 
been an interested witness but also an active participant in the work of upbuilding 
and improvement. He has now reached the eightieth milestone on the journey of 
life and can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future with- 
out fear, for his life has been characterized by honor and integrity in all relations. 



LANNES LAMAR ANTRIM. 

A history of Greenwich township would hardly be complete without mention 
of Lannes Lamar Antrim, one of the most prominent and highly respected citizens 
of the community. He was born in West Middleburg, Logan county, Ohio, Jan- 
uary 10, 1841, a son of Joshua and Mary (Grubb) Antrim. His grandfather, 
Thomas Antrim, who came from Culpeper county, Virginia, was a Quaker and 
was the first minister of any denomination to arrive in Logan county, while his son, 
Daniel Antrim, was the first white child born in that county. 

Joshua Antrim, the father of our subject, was identified with the tailoring busi- 
ness and was also a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church for some time, 
while later he became an adherent of the Swedenborgian faith. He was a man of 
great literary ability and a historian of broad information. He was also greatly in- 
terested at all times in the pioneer organizations of Logan and Champaign coun- 
ties and at the solicitation of the Logan County Pioneer Society, in 1874, he pre- 
pared and published a history of that county. His death occurred in November, 
1874. He had wedded Miss Mary Grubb and unto them were born twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Avar ilia, the wife of Eli Cowgill; Lannes Lamar, of this review; 
Hester, the wife of William Stoop, of Ottumwa, Iowa; Elizabeth, the wife of 
Moses Euans ; Matilda, deceased ; Joseph, also deceased ; Sarah, who wedded Wil- 
liam Glasgow, of Muncie, Indiana ; Ida and Anna, who have passed away ; Thomas, 
residing in Columbus ; Mary, deceased ; and one who died in infancy. Joseph An- 
trim was a prominent minister of the Episcopal church and preached the funeral ser- 
mon over the remains of General Gordon, the well known and eloquent lecturer. 
He passed away several years ago in New Orleans. 

Ifi a home of culture and refinement, Lannes Lamar Antrim passed the days 
of his boyhood and youth, acquiring his education in the public schools of West 
Middleburg, and at the age of sixteen years took up the blacksmith's trade, in 
which line of work he has continuously engaged to the present time. He remained 
in his native town until 1896, when he came to Greenwich and has since made 



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42 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

his home in this city. Here he has devoted his time and energies to the conduct of 
his business affairs, in which he has met with most gratifying success. 

On the 1 8th of January, 1862, Mr. Antrim was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Prall. a daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Hutchins) Prall, natives of Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, who came to Ohio about the year 1844. Her father was a 
prominent horse dealer and bought horses for the government during the period of 
the Mexican war, being considered an expert in this line of business. He passed 
away many years ago in Logan county. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Antrim was 
blessed with six children, as follows: Catherine, the wife of Scott Norvall, of 
Arizona; Jessie, engaged in teaching in the public schools of Cleveland; Homer, 
deceased; Ltuise, also teaching in the Cleveland public schools; Carl, of Green- 
wich; and Crystal, the wife of Fred Hines, the cashier of the Farmers Bank of 
Greenwich. 

The family were for years members of the Methodist Protestant church, while 
Mr. Antrim acted as superintendent of the Sunday school most of the time for 
twenty-five years and was always active in the work of the church and Sunday 
school. Since ccming to Greenwich, however, the family have attended the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, there being no Methodist Protestant organization in this 
city. Mr. Antrim now gives his allegiance to the republican party, although for 
some years he was affiliated with the prohibition party, being deeply interested in 
and active in the support of the cause of temperance. He is a splendid type of the 
American citizen who at all times stands for that which is highest and best in the 
world, supporting many measures of reform and improvement that uplift human- 
ity and work for the common weal. 



WASHINGTON IRVING ADAMS. 

Washington Irving Adams is one of the active and progressive agriculturists 
of Huron county, making his heme on his farm of one hundred acres in Fairfield 
township. He is a native of that township, his birth having there occurred on the 
7th of November, 1842. His parents were Sherwood and Delecta (Foote) Adamt>, 
the former a son of David and Betsy (Lyon) Adams and the latter a daughter of 
Ebenezer and Lydia (Ga^e) Foote. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood Adams were 
born two children, Linden and Washington Irving. 

The last named has been engaged in general agricultural pursuits throughout 
his entire business career and has resided on his present farm of one hundred acres 
for the past twenty-five years. As the result of his unremitting industry and cap- 
able management he has gained a gratifying measure of prosperity in his under- 
takings and has long been numbered among the substantial and enterprising citi- 
zens of the community. 

In 1864 Mr. Adams was united in marriage to Miss Lovisa Carbine, a daugh- 
ter of Horace and Clarissa Carbine, by whom he has one child, Lena, who was born 
in 1870. She was educated in a college at Hillsdale, Michigan, and afterward 
taught in a hi^h school of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, but is now in Logansport,. 
Indiana. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 43 

In his political views Mr. Adams is a stanch republican, while his religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the Baptist church, with which his wife is also 
identified. Having spent his entire life in this locality, he is well known and rhe 
fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have known him from his 
boyhcod is an indication that his career is worthy of respect and confidence. 



anna j. Mcpherson. 

Mrs. Anna J. McPherson, who is of Scotch-Irish descent, owns one hundred 
and twenty-three acres of land in Greenfield township, where she has lived for 
more than sixty years, being born in this township, January 17, 1824. Her parents, 
John and Martha (Easter) Arthur, were of Irish birth but came to this county 
in the d;«ys of the pioneers. They settled in Greenfield township, cleared their own 
farm and became substantial citizens of the land of their adoption. A more ex- 
tended mention of them and of their descendants is given in the sketch of Robert 
Arthur, a farmer of Greenfield township. 

Mrs. McPherson has spent all her life in this township. Her education was ac- 
quired in the public schools of Steuben and the practical experience that fitted her 
to be the wife of a farmer was obtained at home with her parents. In her young- 
womanhood she was married August 12, 1841, to James McPherson, the son of 
William and Mary McPherson, natives of Ireland but numbered among the early 
settlers of Bronson township. James McPherscn was also of Irish birth and was 
the first of his family to come to this country. He was a young man and came 
alone, but, after finding that the chances of making his way in the world were so 
much better here than in Ireland sent for his parents. He had learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, which he followed on coming to Ohio, and it is said that he helped to 
build some of the first houses in Norwalk. After obtaining employment in several 
other places, he went to Steuben, where he assisted in building the Congregational 
church. Shortly after that he abandoned his trade for the pursuit of farming, for 
in 1846, he had purchased a good-sized tract of land, that on which his widow lives 
today. It was at the time virgin soil, well covered with timber, and the work of 
clearing the forest was no small undertaking. The greater part of this he did 
himself as well as building his fine house. Many improvements have since been 
made, and were, in fact, instituted before Mr. McPherson's life was closed on the 
22i\ of June, 1858, at the age of forty- four years and four months to the day. A 
hard-working man, his integrity of deed and purpose was recognized by his fel- 
lows, who as whigs elected him to fill the office of treasurer of the township. His 
religious affiliation was with the Congregational church. 

Of the marriage that was solemnized in the Arthur home on the 12th of August, 
1841, there were born three children: William Hamilton, living in Bronson town- 
ship, was twice married, the first time to Miss Lucy A. Wheeler, who left three 
children. Arthur, William H. and Scott, and the second time to Miss Margaret 
Much, and they have two sons, Clyde and Glenn. George A., the second son, is a 
resident of Greenfield township. He married Miss Emma Willoughby, by whom 
he has had two children: Robert, deceased; and Jennie, who is the wife of Ered 



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44 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Flyn and has a daughter Helen. They live in Ashland county, Ohio. John F., the 
youngest son, lives at home and manages his mother's farm. He attended the pub- 
lic school at Steuben, from which he went to the National Normal College at Le- 
banon, Ohio, where he took a teacher's course. For a few years after completing 
his education he devoted himself to instructing others in the rudiments of the Eng- 
lish language and other school subjects and then engaged in farming. He has 
been successful in agriculture and has won for himself a respected position among 
the citizens of Greenfield township, whom he has served to their satisfaction as jus- 
tice of the peace and as town clerk and in other capacities, having held the first 
mentioned office through a period of twenty-three years, and the second for twenty- 
one years. He is a democrat in pclitics and a member of the Presbyterian church, 
in which he has held several offices. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights 
of the Maccabees and has held almost all the offices of the tent. 

During the more than half-century that Mrs. McPherson has lived upon her 
farm she has witnessed and participated in the many changes that have trans- 
formed the country from a sparsely inhabited tract of undeveloped field and forest, 
into one of the best improved portions of the state. The progress is gratifying and 
especially is the knowledge that her farm has kept up with the march of time and 
is as improved and well cultivated a tract as is included in the township of 
Greenfield. 



MRS. ANNIE M. STENTZ. 

Analyzation of character is perhaps the ipost difficult task that ever confronts 
the historian, so complex are the interests that enter in and so diversified are the 
forces which have influence upon the individual. It would seem almost impos- 
sible to point out the salient factors in the life of Mrs. Annie M. Stentz, for hers 
is a well rounded life in which notable business ability, broad humanitarianism, 
kindly spirit and liberal culture are well balanced forces. She is probably with- 
out excf p tion the most prominent and best known woman in Huron county and 
has had the notable distinction of being the only woman national bank president in 
the United States. 

A native of Ashland county, Ohio, her birth occurred in Mifflin township, 
March 31, 1846, her parents being Benjamin and Annie (Albert) Newcomer, 
both of whom were natives of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She has been a resident 
of Monroeville, Huron county, since 1863, and on the 4th of October, 1872. she 
gave her hand in marriage to Orren W. Head, a native of Paris, Oneida county, 
New York, born in May, 1808. His parents were Jonathan and Hepzibah (Liver- 
more) Head, natives of Rhode Island and New Hampshire, respectively. Orren 
W. Head was reared to farm life and was educated in the subscription schools of 
the neighborhood. In 1836 he wedded Julia Crane of Marshall, Oneida county, 
New York, and unto them were born three sons and two daughters, but the lat- 
ter are now deceased. In 1842 Mr. Head and his family became residents of 
Ridgefield township, Huron county, where he purchased four hundred and 
twenty acres of land, the greater part of which was formerly the Sours farm. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 49 

As the years passed he kept his land well improved and cultivated, bringing the 
fields under a high state of development so that rich crops were annually har- 
vested. In 1857 he erected what is now known as the Davis block in Monroe- 
ville, where he conducted a banking business for a number of years, the enter- 
prise being first conducted as the Perkins & Head Exchange Bank. Following 
the death of the senior partner it became known as the O. W. Head Exchange 
Bank and was so maintained until 1863, when Mr. Head sold out to S. V. Hark- 
ness. He always conducted a private banking business and through his careful 
and wise management accumulated a goodly fortune, while the integrity of his 
business methods won him the high regard of all. One of the founders of the 
Monroeville National Bank, he served as its president from the time of its incep- 
tion until his death, which occurred October 2, 1882. Mr. Head was honored 
for his loyalty to his friends, for his public-spirited devotion to the general good 
and his support of all projects for the intellectual and moral uplift of the com- 
munity. He assisted more men in their hour of need to secure homes than any 
other one citizen in the county, and the spirit of friendless thus manifested won 
for him an almost limitless circle of friends. 

It was upon the death of Mr. Head that his widow, now Mrs. Stentz, gave 
evidence of her superior business qualifications. Assuming the management of 
the estate she soon brought order out of chaos in a manner that at once stamped 
her as one of the most capable of modern business women. She received a goodly 
inheritance from her husband and, possessing a fondness for business manage- 
ment, controlled her affairs with rare skill and discrimination. One of her fav- 
orite investments was the stock of the First National Bank of Monroeville, and 
in the course of time she and Henry P. Stentz became the largest stockholders. 
Their marriage, which occurred April 15, 1901, brought about a transfusion of 
interests which gave them control of the corporation. 

Henry P. Stentz, up to the time of his death the president of the First Na- 
tional Bank, was prominent in the array of leading financiers and capitalists of 
Monroeville and Ohio. He was always a builder and not a wrecker of for- 
tunes, his work being along constructive lines and of a character that con- 
tributed to general success as well as to individual prosperity. There was no 
name more honored or respected throughout Huron county than that of Henry 
P. Stentz, who was richly endowed with all those qualities which constituted good 
citizenship and honorable manhood. He was born in Middletown, Pennsylvania, 
February 26, 1838, and was descended from German ancestry, from whom he 
inherited his characteristic energy, good judgment and other business qualities 
that made him the successful financier he proved himself to be. His parents were 
Peter and Catherine (Keller) Stentz, natives of Pennsylvania, who removed to 
Huron county, Ohio, in 1840. After a brief period they established their home 
in Plymouth, Richmond county, but much of the residue of their days was passed 
at Galion, Crawford county, to which place they removed in 1853. 

Henry P. Stentz acquired his education in the Union schools of Plymouth 
and crossed the threshold of business life as an employe of A. Atwood, a mer- 
chant and banker of that place. He gave unfaltering loyalty to his employer 
and manifested unremitting diligence in the discharge of the duties that de- 
volved upon him. His remuneration at the outset was only eight dollars per month, 



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50 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

but he gradually worked his way upward, winning the confidence and good will 
of his employer by his diligence, enterprise and trustworthiness. He remained 
with Mr. Atwood until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he launched out 
upon an independent business venture, speculating in several articles of merchan- 
dise, including cotton, hemp, sugar and molasses. This caused him to travel largely 
in the south and while he did not meet with very substantial success in the under- 
taking, owing doubtless to the condition of the markets in those feverish times, 
he yet gained broad experience that proved an excellent stock in trade for future 
business development. 

Following the close of the war Mr. Stentz retired from the field of specula- 
tion and in 1866 accepted a cashiership in the Exchange Bank of Monroeville as 
successor to S. V. Harkness. In 1879 tms bank was organized as the First 
National Bank of Monroeville, with a capital of fifty thousand dollars, Mr. 
Stentz continuing as cashier until 1889, when he was promoted to the presi- 
dency. He also organized the First National Bank of Galion, Ohio, one of the 
first institutions of the kind established under the new regime and he was sub- 
sequently one of the promoters and organizers of the National Bank of Plymouth. 
He manifested the keenest discernment in the solution of intricate financial prob- 
lems and in connection with his banking interests he developed a safe and conserva- 
tive business policy which made his among the strongest financial enterprises of 
this part of the state. Realizing that realty is one of the safest of all invest- 
ments, he made judicious purchases of property, particularly fine farming land 
in the vicinity of Monroeville, and ultimately became the owner of one thousand 
and five acres. 

Mr. Stentz never selfishly hoarded his wealth but was a generous contributor 
to many institutions and movements which were based upon humanitarian prin- 
ciples. Although he did not hold membership with any religious denomination, 
he attended and generously supported the Presbyterian church at Monroeville. 
His record furnishes a notable example of what may be accomplished by a con- 
servative, enterprising business man. Assuming the responsibilities of a bank 
cashiership when twenty-eight years of age, through his close application to 
every duty and his thorough understanding of the business in principle and de- 
tail he widely promoted its growth and extended its business connections. Fol- 
lowing methods which neither sought nor required disguise, he furnished an 
example of honorable endeavor that is indeed well worthy of emulation. Mr. 
Stentz not only succeeded in elevating the Monroeville Exchange Bank to the 
highest point of excellence attained by any institution of the kind in Huron county, 
but in order that its interests might be extended he succeeded in having it reor- 
ganized as a national bank and under his capable control it was made to rank with 
the soundest and best managed banks of northern Ohio. 

The Monroeville Weekly Spectator, during the wild financial panic that 
occurred in the summer of 1893, said: "During a commercial crisis like that 
through which we are now passing, when doubt and distrust are apparent on 
every hand, there is sweet consolation in the thought that the solvency of our own 
home bank is unquestioned. While hundreds of similar institutions throughout 
the length and breadth of the land are forced into suspension or failure, because 
of the existing lack of confidence, the First National Bank of Monroeville stands 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 53 

and will stand a monument of integrity, judgment and fidelity to the efficient 
management it has ever enjoyed and which today is identical with that under 
which it began its career over twenty-seven years ago. The present crisis finds 
it in better condition than ever before to cope with panical problems and it will 
speedily and satisfactorily solve all that are presented provided they legitimately 
come within the sphere of its action. Mr. Stentz has been the moving spirit, 
the power behind the throne, the manager from the organization to the present 
time, and to his efforts are chiefly attributable the long continued prosperity and 
substantial growth that have characterized the bank's career and the enviable repu- 
tation, standing and confidence which it now enjoys." 

The death of Mr. Stentz occurred in Monroeville, June 9, 1903, after an illness 
of six weeks. He had been called one of nature's noblemen and was a man 
honored by young and old, rich and poor. One of the local papers said of him : 
"Mr. Stentz never aspired to official honors, but when in 1901 Governor Nash 
honored him with the appointment of trustee of the State Hospital at Toledo 
he accepted. As an officer he was painstaking, prompt and accurate in duty, 
accommodating to those for whom he transacted business, and urbane to all with 
whom he had to deal. His business judgment was sought and relied upon. He 
was always cautious in advancing an opinion, all the consequences of which he 
could not forecast with reasonable certainty. There were traits of character in 
H. P. Stentz that should be mentioned not only to his individual credit but to 
the honor of mankind. He was always courteous and full of genial qualities 
which attracted others to him, and which will make his loss sorely felt." With- 
out making professions of exalted goodness, he was just to his enemies, chari- 
table to his associates and full of sympathy and devotion to his friends. His 
funeral was one of the largest ever held in Monroeville, many coming from dis- 
tant points to pay the last tribute of honor and respect to one whom they had 
long known and honored, while the entire town regretted his loss as a personal 
bereavement, so closely was he associated with the life and interests of the com- 
munity. 

Following the death of her husband Mrs. Stentz took up the burden of the 
business affairs. The control of the bank stock passed to her and she was im- 
mediately made president of the institution. This was a rare distinction, as 
she was the only lady president of a national bank in the United States. Her 
advent was heralded by all financial and daily papers over the country. She 
insisted on conducting the business in a thorough, businesslike manner and 
soon found favor with patrons and stockholders of the bank alike. The first 
National under her control became recognized as a safe, sound and prosperous 
concern. Not contented with her interests in that direction, Mrs. Stentz soon 
turned her attention to traction interests and now owns and controls the San- 
dusky, Norwalk & Mansfield electric line between Norwalk and Shelby, Ohio. 
This is one of her best investments and she is the vice president and a director of 
the company. She also has many other important business interests which en- 
gage her wise sagacity and untiring enterprise. She is the vice president of the 
Hull-Stentz Realty Company, of Toledo, and numerous other concerns and 
corporations. She is entirely fearless in all of her business operations, entering 



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54 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

upon large deals with intrepidity and confidence. Her insight is most keen, her 
judgment seldom if ever at fault. 

Notwithstanding all this Mrs. Stentz is essentially feminine and domestic in 
her taste, spending a great deal of her time in her beautiful country home on 
the Monroeville road between Norwalk and Monroeville. Her charities are many 
and she contributes to churches and benevolent organizations most generously, 
yet she never gives with ostentation or display. She has undoubtedly given 
as much for such causes as any other person in the county. One of her gifts, 
for which she will never cease to be remembered, was that of a handsome monu- 
ment erected in honor of the soldiers and sailors of Ridgefield. In 1901 Rev. 
Charles S. Aves started a movement for raising a fund for the purpose, his 
plans being to take up a collection each Memorial day until a sufficient amount 
was secured, but in two years only eighty-seven dollars had been received. Mrs. 
Annie M. Stentz afterward announced her determination to erect the monument 
to perpetuate the memory of the brave boys in blue. The contract was awarded, 
the work was executed and on the 29th of September, 1904, she unveiled the 
monument and presented it as a gift to the city. It was made a gala day in the 
history of Monroeville. On that occasion there was witnessed the largest pro- 
cession ever known in the town and with appropriate music and addresses the 
occasion was made one never to be forgotten by any who were present. Mrs. 
Stentz is ever ready to extend a helping hand to the poor and needy and yet she 
does not believe in that indiscriminate giving which fosters vagrancy or idleness. 
Her charities are broad and practical, and her influence on the business life of the 
community has been essentially along constructive lines. Recognized as the equal 
in ability of the men who are most prominent in the commercial and financial 
circles of Huron county, she is at the same time lacking in none of those social 
graces which make her a most charming hostess and valued companion in so- 
cial functions. 



FRANCIS J. ELMLINGER. 

Francis J. Elmlinger, now deceased, was for many years numbered among the 
prominent and successful agriculturists of Sherman township, there owning a well 
improved and valuable farm of one hundred and seventy-two acres at the time of 
his demise. He was born in Baden, Germany, his parents being Conrad and Mary 
Elmlinger, by whom he was brought to the United States when a little lad of seven 
years. They first took up their abode in Huron county, Ohio, but subsequently re- 
moved to Paulding county, this state, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 

On attaining man's estate Francis J. Elmlinger was united in marriage to 
Miss Catherine Weidinger, a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Weidinger, who 
was a little maiden of eight years when she accompanied her parents on their emi- 
gration to the new world. The children born of this union are as follows : Joseph 
J., who resides on the home farm with his mother and sisters ; John F., who wed- 
ded Miss Monica Brobst and makes his home in Sherman township ; Peter C, liv- 
ing at Norwalk, Ohio, who married Miss Catherine Schell ; Mary C, who is at 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 55 

home ; Rosa E., the wife of Aloys Miller, of Sherman township ; and Anna D., who 
is likewise at home. 

Francis J. Elmlinger devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pur- 
suits throughout his active business career and was widely recognized as a most 
substantial, enterprising and progressive citizen of Sherman township. His poli- 
tical allegiance was unfalteringly given to the democratic party and he capably 
served in the position of road supervisor for several years. He was a Catholic 
in religious belief and acted as a councilman in St. Sebastian's church. Honorable 
in business, loyal in citizenship, charitable in thought, kindly in action, true to every 
trust confided to his care, his life was the highest type of Christian manhood. 

Since the death of their father Joseph J. and John F. Elmlinger have oper- 
ated the old homestead farm in partnership, conducting their interests under the 
name of Elmlinger Brothers. The place comprises one hundred and seventy-two 
acres of rich and arable land in Sherman township and in its cultivation the broth- 
ers are meeting with well merited and gratifying success, being men of energy, en- 
terprise and good business ability. Joseph J. Elmlinger is a stockholder in the 
Sherman Oil & Gas Company, which is drilling for oil in Sherman township at 
the present time. The officers of the company are as follows: J. R. Bischoff, 
president ; Daniel Heyman, vice president ; J. P. Heyman, treasurer ; and Joseph 
J. Elmlinger, secretary. Henry Scheid, L. P. Heyman and A. F. Heyman are the 
directors of the concern. Joseph J. Elmlinger exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the men and measures of the democracy and has acted as road su- 
pervisor, while at the present time he is serving as clerk of Sherman township. 
He is a faithful communicant of the Catholic church and fraternally is identified 
with the Knights of Columbus at Monroeville. 

John F. Elmlinger lives just across the road from the old homestead farm but 
is making preparations to erect a new residence on the ground adjoining the home 
of his mother, brother and sisters. The members of the family are well known 
and highly esteemed throughout the community and are numbered among the rep- 
resentative, respected and leading residents of Sherman township. 



ELZIE G. PALMER. 



A well improved farm of eighty-five acres, situated in Fairfield township, is the 
home of Elzie G. Palmer, who has followed agriculture as a life work. His birth 
occurred in New Haven township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 20th of June, 1867, 
his parents being Milton and Isadore (Burlingham) Palmer, who were also na- 
tives of this county, the father having been born in New Haven township in 1842, 
while the mother's birth occurred in Norwich township. The Palmer family is of 
English extraction. The paternal grandparents of Elzie G. Palmer were Meigs 
and Betsy (Curtis) Palmer, while his maternal grandparents were Earl and Ro- 
setta (Carpenter) Burlingham. 

Elzie G. Palmer obtained his education in the district schools and was reared in 
the usual manner of farm lads, assisting his father from the time of early spring 
planting until the crops were harvested in the late autumn. As stated above, he 



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56 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

has given his attention to the work of general farming throughout his entire busi- 
ness career, and for the past four years he has resided on his farm of eighty-five 
acres in Fairfield township. He annually harvests rich crops as a reward for the 
care and labor which he bestows upon the fields, cultivating the land according to 
the modern methods of farming. 

On the 23d of July, 1890, Mr. Palmer was joined in wedlock to Miss Emma 
Russell, a daughter of John and Mary (Lewis) Russell, of Ripley township, this 
county. Their union has been blessed with seven children, namely: Florence; 
Ross ; Elva ; Carl ; Esther and Isadore, twins ; and Clarence. Mr. Palmer gives his 
political allegiance to the men and measures of the republican party, being con- 
vinced that its principles are most conducive to good government. His entire life 
has been passed in this county and his fellow townsmen know him as a straight- 
forward, reliable and progressive citizen, who well merits the esteem that is uni- 
formly accorded him. 



FRANK J. GIES. 



Not all who take up the work of the farm meet with success. There are cer- 
tain indispensable elements, including industry, perseverance and good judgment, 
to tell the individual when is the best time of planting and what are the best meth- 
ods of caring for the crops. Mr. Gies seems to possess all the essential elements of 
success in agricultural lines, for he is now one of the substantial and prosperous 
farmer of Peru township. A glance at his place at once indicates to the passerby 
that his methods are practical and progressive. His farm, comprising one hundred 
and thirty acres, presents a most attractive appearance, for the land is under a high 
state of cultivation and gives promise of golden harvests in the autumn. 

He was born in Bronson township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 25th of Octo- 
ber, 1872, his parents being Michael and Blondina (Remley) Gies. The paternal 
grandfather, who was a native of Germany, made the voyage to this country about 
1822 and became one of the early settlers of Bronson township, this county. The 
log house which he here erected was the birthplace of his son Michael, who re- 
mained a resident of Huron county throughout his entire life. The latter was an 
agriculturist by occupation, in which line of activity he won success by reason of 
his untiring industry and capable management. He was a valued and prominent 
member of the Catholic church, to which he contributed liberally of his time and 
means and in the faith of which he passed away in 1905. His wife, whose birth 
occurred in Germany in 1840, accompanied her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Remley, on their emigration to the United States in 1848, the family home being 
established in Bronson township, this county. She still survives and is well known 
and highly esteemed throughout the entire community. By her marriage she be- 
came the mother of seven children, namely: August, who is now a resident of 
Crawford county, Ohio ; Ferdinand, living in Bronson township ; Amelia, who is 
the wife of Emil Schnurr and makes her home in Bronson township ; Lawrence, at 
home ; Frank J., of this review ; William, likewise a resident of Bronson township ; 
and Leo, who is at home. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 57 

Frank J. Gies attended the district and German schools in the acquirement of 
an education and continued a resident of Bronson township until 1891. He 
worked for Mr. Remley for about three years, on the expiration of which period 
he went to Norwalk and was there in the employ of John Gardner for about nine 
years. Subsequently he purchased his present farm of one hundred and thirty 
acres in Peru township from Ed Lawrence and has here since carried on his agri- 
cultural interests with excellent results. He has remodeled the house and barn, 
also erected a number of outbuildings and altogether has a well improved and 
model farming property. 

On the 15th of February, 1900, Mr. Gies was united in marriage to Miss Rose 
Reichert, a native of Germany and a daughter of Conrad and Helen Reichert 
When a maiden of sixteen years she crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 
company with some friends but her parents never left the fatherland. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Gies have been born three children : Oscar, whose birth occurred Feb- 
ruary 20, 1903; Walter, whose natal day was September 6, 1905; and Leander, 
who was born on the 6th of April, 1909. 

Mr. Gies is a faithful communicant of the Catholic church. In 1908, in com- 
pany with his wife, he made a trip to Europe and visited Germany, Switzerland 
and Italy, spending about nine weeks abroad. Having lived in Huron county 
throughout his entire life, he is well known within its borders and the many ex- 
cellent traits of his character have brought to him the warm friendship of those 
with whom he has been associated. 



REV. P. J. QUINN. 



Rev. P. J. Quinn, who since the 4th of October, 1903, has been in charge of the 
parish of St. Mary's church in Norwalk, was born in Niles, Ohio, on the 16th of 
February, 1874. His father, Charles Quinn, was a native of County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, and came to the United States in the late '60s, at which time he settled in Ohio, 
remaining a resident here until his death on the 14th of December, 1907. His 
widow, who bore the name of Bridget Gallagher, is also a native of Ireland and is 
still living, being now a resident of Niles, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Quinn be- 
came the parents of fourteen children, six sons and eight daughters. 

In the schools of his native town P. J. Quinn acquired his early education 
and afterward had the benefit of instruction at Notre Dame University for three 
and a half years. He also spent a year and a half at St. Charles College in Mary- 
land and pursued a theological course at St. Mary's Seminary in Cleveland. He 
was then ordained to the priesthood on the 9th of June, 1900, in Cleveland and 
his first two years of pastoral work were spent as assistant at St. Agnes' church 
in that city. Later, he was given charge of the Catholic church in Van Wert, 
Ohio, where he remained for one year and three months as guardian over the 
spiritual interests of St. Mary's church and on the 4th of October, 1903, he came 
to Norwalk to take charge of St. Mary's church at this place. He has been lo- 
cated here for about six years and is doing excellent work for the cause of Catho- 
licism. The interests of the church are well organized and he has the hearty co- 



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58 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

operation of its members. He is very zealous in the work and is, moreover, a 
man of scholarly attainments, capable of holding the interest of his auditors when 
he addresses them upon religious themes. Father Quinn has three sisters who 
are members of religious bodies, Sadie and Ellen being connected with the Sis- 
ters of the Humility of Mary in the diocese of Cleveland, while Catherine is as- 
sociated with the Sisters of St. Joseph in Erie, Pennsylvania. 



WILLIAM H. PIERCE. 



William H. Pierce, a well known and successful merchant of Wakeman, was 
born at that place en the 19th of August, 1840, a son of Lemuel B. and Eunice 
(Burr) Pierce. In 1815, Lemuel B. Pierce accompanied his parents Mr. and 
Mrs. Amile P. Pierce, on their removal from Connecticut to Huron county, Ohio. 
They made the journey by wagon, bringing all their earthly possessions with them. 
The log cabin which they erected was the third one built in Wakeman township 
and as this part of the state was still covered with timber, they had to clear the 
land before it could be utilized for farming purposes. As the years passed, Lem- 
uel B. Pierce won success in his agricultural interests, owing to his untiring and 
well directed labor, and eventually became an extensive landowner. He also built 
and operated one of the first sawmills in Wakeman and was highly esteemed 
throughout the. community as one of its worthy pioneer settlers whose efforts 
proved an important factor in the work of early development. He was a man of 
powerful physique and when in his prime could stand with his feet in a half bushel 
measure and shoulder five bushels of wheat, weighing three hundred pounds. 
Public-spirited and progressive, his aid and co-operation could always be counted 
upon to further any movement or measure instituted to promote the general wel- 
fare and at the polls, he gave his support to the candidates whom he believed 
would best conserve the public weal, but never sought office as a reward for his 
party fealty. His demise occurred in September, 1875, while his wife was called 
to her final rest in 1866, their remains being interred in the Wakeman cemetery. 
Their family numbered five children, namely : Amelia, who died when about seven 
years of age ; Elbert B., who is now deceased ; William H., of this review ; Julia 
J., the widow of Theodore V. Bunce ; and Frank L., who has also passed away. 

William H. Pierce was reared under the parental roof and early in life aided 
his father in the arduous labor incident to the development of a frontier farm. 
He obtained his preliminary education in the public schools of Wakeman and 
afterward attended Oberlin University for several terms. During the winter 
of 1860-61, he taught school in Wakeman township and in September, 1861, 
enlisted for service in the Union army as a member of Company H, Forty-first 
Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In 1862, he was promoted to the rank of 
lieutenant and transferred to Company B of the same regiment, commanding the 
company for two years. The regiment was attached to the Army of the Cumber- 
land and saw much arduous service, participating in many hotly contested engage- 
ments. In the campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta, Mr. Pierce was under fire 
for one hundred days, but in spite of this and many other hazardous experiences, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 59 

he escaped injury and imprisonment and had been in the service for more than 
three years before suffering from even a day's illness. He was mustered out on 
the 31st of January, 1865, about six months after the expiration of his three 
years' term of enlistment, and returned home with a military record of which he 
had every reason to be proud. Soon afterward, he became identified with the 
mercantile interests of Wakeman as a member of the firm of Harris, Pierce & # 
Baldwin, handling a general line of merchandise and farm implements. In 1880, 
he sold his interest to his partners and purchased a farm in Richland county, being 
there engaged in agricultural pursuits for about six years. Returning to Wake- 
man on the expiration of that period, he once more became connected with mer- 
cantile pursuits and had been continuously connected with that line of activity 
to the present time, conducting his enterprise under the firm name of W. H. Pierce 
& Sons. In addition to carrying a fine line of groceries, boots and shoes and school 
supplies, they make a specialty of handling and shipping eggs and are generally 
conceded to be the most extensive dealers in eggs in the entire county. Mr. Pierce 
is a man of resourceful business ability, whose capably directed labors and keen 
discernment constitute the basis of the splendid success which has attended his 
effort. The neat and tasteful arrangement of his store, combined with the rea- 
sonable prices and earnest desire to please his patrons have secured for him a 
large and very gratifying trade. 

On the 1 8th of April, 1864, while at home on a recruiting mission, Mr. Pierce 
was united in marriage to Miss Docia A. Waugh, a daughter of Lansing and Docia 
(Minor) Waugh, of Wakeman township. Unto them were born five children, the 
record of whom is as follows: Clarence H., who is associated with his father in 
business, was married on the 9th of February, 1886, to Miss Eva Brandt, a daugh- 
ter of W. Shannon and Elizabeth (Cassell) Brandt, of Richland county. They 
now have four daughters : Flora A., Bessie B., Mabel B. and Docia E. Arthur 
M. Pierce, who is associated in business with his father and brother, celebrated 
his marriage on the 25th of December, 1890, the lady of his choice being Miss 
Flora Marshall, a daughter of William H. and Rebecca (Will) Marshall, of 
Richland county. By this union there are three children: Lester, Florence and 
William, Gilbert Pierce, son of William H. Pierce, passed away when but two 
years of age. Ada M. was called to her final rest at the age of twenty-five years, 
and Anna died in infancy. In 1909, Mr. Pierce was called upon to mourn the loss 
of his wife, who passed away on the 14th of January of that year, her demise 
being the occasion of deep and sincere regret to all who knew her. 

Though his business interests make extensive demands upon his time and en- 
ergies, Mr. Pierce still finds opportunity for active co-operation in matters per- 
taining to the public welfare and is an influential factor in the local ranks of the 
republican party. He is a member of the republican county committee and al- 
most every year attends the county, district and state conventions as a delegate. 
He polled Wakeman township for twelve consecutive years, his service in this 
connection being remarkable for its accuracy. He was recognized as the most 
expert poller of voters in Huron county, for in most instances it was found that 
his polls were absolutely correct and in perfect accord with the results shown on 
election day. For a number of years prior to 1880, which year witnessed his re- 
moval to Richland county, he served as postmaster at Wakeman and after re- 



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60 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

turning to this town, he was again appointed postmaster in 1890, capably dis- 
charging the duties of the office for four years. He has also acted as constable 
of Wakeman township and was likewise township trustee and township clerk for 
a number of years. From the time that he returned from the army until within 
the past few years, his fellow townsmen kept him almost continuously in public 
office — a fact which speaks in unmistakable terms of his personal popularity and 
the confidence and trust reposed in him. His sons, emulating the splendid rec- 
ord of their father in private and public life, have become widely recognized as 
substantial and progressive citizens and take a helpful interest in matters of 
public concern. Clarence H. Pierce now serving as treasurer of Wakeman town- 
ship. A valued representative of the Masonic fraternity here, William H. Pierce 
belongs to Gibson Lodge, No. 301, F. & A. M., in which he has filled most of 
the offices. He is also a member of Wilson Todd Post, No. 559, G. A. R., in 
which he has filled all of the offices and for the past twelve years, has been quar- 
ter-master of the post. He has frequently been a delegate to the state encamp- 
ments, often attends the national encampments and for the past forty years, has 
been a regular attendant at the annual reunions of the Forty-first Regiment of 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He and his family are prominent members of the Con- 
gregational church and are active workers in both church and Sunday school. 
Mr. Pierce having frequently served as an officer on the different church boards. 
Such in brief is the life history of one of Huron county's most widely known and 
highly respected citizens. In whatever relation of life we find him — in the govern- 
ment service, in political circles, in business or in social relations — he is always 
the same honorable and honored gentleman, whose worth well merits the high 
regard which is uniformly given him. 



WILLIAM A. KNAPP. 



One of the influential business men of Greenwich township, Huron county, 
is William A. Knapp, a farmer, stockman and banker. He was born in Maranac, 
Connecticut, January 10, 1841, and is the son of William A. and Harriet (Mar- 
shall) Knapp, both of whom were natives of Westchester county, New York. 
They grew up and were married there. The second year after their union they 
removed to Connecticut, where Mr. Knapp assumed the management of the farm 
of Judge I. Roosevelt, the grandfather of ex-President Theodore Roosevelt, who 
though a resident of New York had large farming interests in the adjoining 
state. In 1846 Mr. Knapp decided to bring his family to Ohio, and made the 
trip by the circuitious route of the Erie canal to Buffalo and by lake vessel 
from Buffalo to Huron, Ohio, which they reached October 3, 1846. The family 
located in Fitchville township, where Mr. Knapp purchased fifty acres of good 
land from his father Sylvanus Knapp, who had secured the land in 1836 as a 
part of the Firelands reservation, but had never become a resident of Ohio. 
The entire fifty acres were heavily covered with timber, and the winter of 1846- 
47 was spent in clearing two acres and in building a frame house for his family, 
which was one of the first frame buildings erected in that township. In the spring 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 63 

of 1847 tne two acres he had cleared Mr. Knapp planted in corn, employing a 
method of doing this that was crude in the extreme. With his ax he would 
first make a hole in the ground, drop in the grains of corn, and then with his 
foot brush back the dirt to cover the hole. The work of clearing went on rapidly, 
and as he saw opportunity Mr. Knapp bought large tracts of land until he owned 
two hundred and forty acres. He pursued general farming and also engaged 
in stock buying and shipping, finding a market for his stock in Buffalo. In 
1881 he sold his farm and removed to Greenwich, where he became active in 
the organization of the Greenwich Banking Company, the first bank in the 
village. He was elected its first president and held the position until his death, 
July 17, 1888. He was a man of means, who took a deep interest in public mat- 
ters, although he never participated in politics with a view to self -advance- 
ment. Originally he was a whig, but of later years espoused the republican cause 
and was always to be seen at the polls at election time. He had for a number of 
years been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church and when he 
died was mourned as a man of sterling traits of character. His wife, who pos- 
sessed many virtues and was beloved by all who knew her, survived him a little 
over a year, her death occurring on the 10th of September, 1889, and she was 
buried by his side in the cemetery at Fitchville. 

William A. Knapp, the subject of this sketch, was reared under the parental 
roof and received his education in the district schools of the county, but because 
of the need of his services on the farm did not continue the period of his train- 
ing beyond his sixteenth year. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, 
One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served for four 
months with the Army of the Potomac. At the end of his term of enlistment 
he entered the government telegraph service under Dennis Doren, superinten- 
dent of construction with the Army of the Potomac. During the two years he 
was engaged in this work he was rapidly promoted and was given the position 
of foreman for meritorious service. In the fall of 1867, when the telegraph lines 
south of the Mason and Dixon's line were returned to the control of the original 
owners, Mr. Knapp left the employ of the government, entering that of the 
Western Union Telegraph Company. He remained with this corporation for one 
year, in that time assisting in the building of the cable connection between 
Pirate's Cove, on the northern line of Nova Scotia, to the northern line of New 
Brunswick. Returning home at the expiration of a year, he engaged with his 
father in farming and stock shipping, a partnership that continued until the 
older man removed to Greenwich village, after which Mr. Knapp continued 
the business alone. In 1895 he removed to Greenwich, where in addition to his 
farming and stock business he has identified himself with the village life and 
work. He was made president of the Farmers' Banking Company and is a 
stockholder in the First National Bank of New London and in the Capital Trust 
Company of Columbus. In 1900 he served as land appraiser for Fitchville town- 
ship and has in other ways evinced his interest in public matters. In politics he 
is a republican and is frequently a representative of his party in county, district 
and state conventions. 

On the 27th of March, 1879, Mr - Knapp was married to Miss Philena Kirk- 
patrick, a daughter of William and Charlotte (Coden), the former a farmer of 



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64 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Fitchville township. To Mr. and Mrs. Knapp have been born two sons, Jay D., 
who was formerly assistant cashier of the Greenwich Banking Company, but on 
account of ill health has removed to California ; and Harley B., who is assistant 
cashier of the Farmers Banking Company, of which his father is president. Mrs. 
Knapp died July 31, 1892, mourned by those who knew her and had been the re- 
cipients of her many acts of thought fulness and kindness. 

Mr. Knapp and his family affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church and 
support all Christian and charitable work. He belongs to Floral Lodge, No. 
260, F. & A. M., in which he takes an active part. A man of means, his land- 
holdings amount to three hundred and ten acres besides his fine home in Green- 
wich. He is distinguished for his public spirit and is a strong advocate of good 
government and improvements, being of the opinion that by such things may the 
progress of a community be gauged. 



BYRON EMORY JENNINGS. 

Byron Emory Jennings, who is now living practically retired in North Fair- 
field, where he owns a tract of ten acres of land, was formerly actively and suc- 
cessfully identified with the agricultural interests of this county. His birth oc- 
curred in Fairfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 26th of October, 1853, 
his parents being Ezra S. and Harriet (Godden) Jennings, who were natives of 
Connecticut and New York respectively. The father was born on the 6th of 
August, 1828, while the mother's birth occurred October 13, 1829. 

Byron Emory Jennings has always devoted his time and energies to agricul- 
tural pursuits, in which he has met with excellent success, annually harvesting 
good crops as the result of his practical and progressive methods in the cultiva- 
tion of the soil. He has now disposed of his farm, however, and is living practi- 
cally retired on a tract of ten acres in North Fairfield. 

On the 24th of January, 1877, Mr. Jennings was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Cowpe, whose birth occurred in England on the 15th of June, 1858, her 
parents being John and Ellen (Frith) Cowpe, also natives of that country. The 
latter, who was born March 24, 1827, gave her hand in marriage to John Cowpe 
on the 23d of March, 1853. Mr. and Mrs. Cowpe made the ocean voyage to the 
United States when their daughter Jennie was but nine months old and in 1859, 
took up their abode at Olena, Huron county, Ohio. The father was a brickmaker 
by trade and followed that pursuit until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he 
enlisted in defense of the Union as a member of Company E, Fifty-fifth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He was killed at the battle of Peach Tree Creek on the 20th 
of July, 1864, thus laying down his life on the altar of his adopted country. Unto 
him and his wife were born the following children: John Sherman, Jennie and 
Mary Ann. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings had four children, namely: Otto, born Octo- 
ber 3, 1878, who wedded Miss Grace Kinger on the 30th of June, 1906, and resides 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Clair Elbert, whose birth occurred March 13, 1886, 
and who is now pursuing a course in mechanical engineering at the Ohio State 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 65 

University; Lee, born May 19, 1891, who is at home; and Harold, born October 
5, 1897, who passed away on the 3d of January, 1898. 

Mr. Jennings is a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, in the work 
of which he takes an active and helpful interest. He is well known and highly 
esteemed throughout the county in which he has made his home from his birth 
to the present time, his upright and honorable life commanding the respect and 
admiration of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in 
contact. 



ELIAS BEACH MITCHELL. 

Elias Beach Mitchell, a retired agriculturist residing in North Farifield, was 
born in Greenfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 30th of December, 1839. 
The paternal grandfather, James Mitchell, who was of Scotch Irish descent, was 
born in New Jersey, about 1745. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Lorena 
Sutton, was of Holland Dutch lineage. Their children were seven in number, 
namely: William N., Betsy, Sarah, Polly, Hezekiah, Moses and James. William 
N. Mitchell, the father of our subject, whose birth occurred in Montgomery 
county, New York, on the 1st of January, 1799, came to Greenwich township, 
Huron county, Ohio, in 182 1, making the journey with his father. As a compan- 
and helpmate on the journey of life, he chose Miss Charisy Beach, who was born 
in Montgomery county, New York, in October, 1812, a daughter of Elias and 
Amanda (Herrick) Beach. Her parents were natives of Massachussetts and 
Connecticut respectively, and the father served as a soldier in the War of 181 2. 
Mrs. Mitchell was the eldest in a family of eleven children, her brothers and sisters 
being as follows: Miles, T., Milton, Erastus, Marshall, Thomas, Jane, Sarah, 
Emily, Flora and Henrietta. About 1824, the Beach family established their 
home in Ashtabula county, Ohio, and about 1830, they came to Huron county, this 
state. Unto William N. and Charisy (Beach) Mitchell, were born two children: 
Philander ; and Elias Beach, of this review. 

The last named obtained his education in the common schools of his home 
neighborhood and after putting aside his text-books, became identified with gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits, in which he was successfully engaged throughout his 
active business career. At the present time, however, he is living retired in the 
enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil, having left the farm and removed to 
North Fairfield in the spring of 1909. He still retains possession of his farm, 
which is a rich and productive tract of land of sixty-four acres in Fairfield town- 
ship. He is now a member of the board of directors of the Huron County Farm- 
ers' Mutual Insurance Company, of which he formerly served as vice-president. 

On the 4th of November, 1862, Mr. Mitchell was united in marriage to Miss 
Cornelia Place, whose birth occurred in New York city on the 26th of Nevember, 
1843, her parents being Thomas and Dora (Barker) Place, whom she accom- 
panied on their removal to Huron county, Ohio, in 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Place had 
a family of five children, namely: George, Lorenzo, Walter, Sarah and Cornelia. 
Unto Elias B. and Cornelia (Place) Mitchell, were born the following children: 
Fremon P., whose birth occurred November 5, 1866, and who wedded Miss Kate 



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66 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Ryerson, of Greenfield township, Huron county ; Donald W. ; Philip ; and Cornelia. 
Subsequent to the death of his first wife Mr. Mitchell was again married, in 1886, 
his second union being with Mrs. Martha J. Sherman, a widow, who was born 
in February, 1843. Her parents were Jonathan and Eliza (Munsel) Collin- 
vood. 

Mr. Mitchell is a prominent and valued member of the Baptist church, in 
which he has served as trustee for about nineteen years. He has always made 
his home in this county, and the fact that many of his stanchest friends are those 
who have known him from his boyhood to the present time, is an indication that 
his life has at all times been honorable and upright — worthy of the high esteem 
in which he is uniformly held. 



DOOR TWADDLE. 



Door Twaddle, a well-to-do farmer of Clarksfield township, Huron county, 
Ohio, was born in this township, March 28, 1852, the son of John J. and Julia 
A. (Palmer) Twaddle. The father was a son of Alexander Twaddle, and was 
born in the southwestern part of Pennsylvania, where the family lived from 1823 
to 1836, and engaged in farming. John J. Twaddle, and his brother Alexander 
came to Clarksfield township in 1835, where the former was married to Miss 
Julia A. Palmer, who had come to Ohio with her parents from Westchester county, 
New York. After their marriage the young couple lived near Norwalk, Ohio, 
where John J. Twaddle worked for Isaac Underbill, a pioneer resident of that 
section. During the twelve years in his employ, Mr. Twaddle saved up sufficient 
money to purchase a farm in Clarksfield township, which was his home 
until his death, which occurred December 28, 1885. His widow survived him 
until November 8, 1889, when she was buried by his side in Clarksfield cemetery. 
Of the children that were born to Mr. and Mrs. Twaddle, Frank died in infancy; 
Ella married J. T. King, and is now a widow living in Wakeman village ; Door is 
the subject of this sketch ; Charlotte married Eugene Fox and lives on the old 
homestead in Clarksfield township ; Leroy and Lilly A., were twins. The former 
of the two died December 14, 1897, but the other married J. L. Judd and lives in 
Marshall county, Kansas. 

Door Twaddle was educated in the schools of Clarksfield and spent his youth 
on his father's farm, assisting in every way he could with the work that went on 
there. At the age of sixteen, he went to Michigan to purchase some land and 
while there worked at various pursuits. At the age of nineteen, he returned home 
and began learning the cheese manufacturing business, entering the factory of 
Parker, Morgan & Hovey. He worked for them for four years and then was 
appointed night superintendent of the factory, subsequently, being put in full 
charge of the establishment. Some years later, he became a partner in another 
cheese factory, located in Clarksfield, which business he conducted for seven years. 
He next entered the firm of J. C. Ransom & Company, where he gained a repu- 
tation as a successful cheese separator. In 1882, Mr. Twaddle gave up his in- 
terests in the cheese factory and took up farming, to which he has devoted all 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 67 

his attention since. He has a tract of two hundred and six acres, all fine land and 
under a fine state of cultivation. 

Mr. Twaddle married Miss Celia Rowland, the daughter of Daniel and Har- 
riet (Chaffee) Rowland, a pioneer family of this county. They came here from 
New York state in 1818 and became very prominent in the development of the 
resources of the township. To Mr. and Mrs. Twaddle have been born three child- 
ren. Wanda, the only daughter, married Elmer P. Finch, of Wilmington. Will- 
iam E. was married on the 17th of June, 1903, to Miss Edna Spurrier, the daugh- 
ter of Royal and Rheta (Stiles) Spurrier. Jay C, the youngest, was married May 
9, 1903, to Miss Bertha Pearsall, the daughter of James and Julia (Scott) Pear- 
sail. Both sons are excellent young men, well educated and thoroughly equipped 
for the affairs of life. They assist their father in the management of his large 
acreage and are up-to-date in the best manner of cultivating the soil. 

Mr. Twaddle is a democrat and is deeply interested in public affairs, though 
not active in his party. He has, however, on many occasions served the people 
well as township trustee, as road supervisor and as a member of the school board. 
He is a member of the Gibson lodge, No. 301, F. & A. M., of Wakeman and 
also of the chapter. The New London lodge of the Independant Order of Odd 
Fellows as well numbers him upon it roll call. In the meetings of his lodges and 
in the general affairs of life, he has proved to be a man of sound principles and 
strong personality. He is progressive and well informed and is accounted one 
of the prosperous farmers of Oarksfield township. 



F. P. STONE. 



F. P. Stone, a well known and enterprising agriculturist residing on his farm 
of thirty acres in Fitchville township, was born in Lorain county, Ohio, on the 
9th of October, 1849, his parents being Ezra and Isabelle (Baldwin) Stone, the 
former a native or Vermont and the latter of Jefferson county, New York. In 
his boyhood days, Ezra Stone was brought to Lorain county, this state, by his 
father, Jcsiah Stone, who there purchased a farm of one hundred and fifteen acres. 
Ezra Stone successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits throughout his 
active business career and subsequent to the death of his father, he came into pos- 
session of the latter's farm, thereon spending his remaining days. Eighty-five 
acres of the original farm of one hundred and fifteen acres is still in possession 
of the family, now belonging to Mrs. Olivia Mull and Joseph P. Stone, a sister 
and brother of our subject. The father gave his political allegiance to the men 
and measures of the democracy. In the year 1846, he wedded Miss Isabell Bald- 
win and their union was blessed with six children, two of whom died in infancy. 
F. P.. of this review ; Orlando G., whose birth occurred in 1853 ; Mrs. Olivia Mull ; 
and Joseph P. With the exception of the first named, all are residents of Lorain 
county. The father, who was born June 7, 1824, died February 15, 1880, and the 
mother, whose birth occurred April 11, 1825, passed away May 19, 1902. 

F. P. Stone remained under the parental roof until after he had attained his 
majority, working out by the month as a farm hand. When twenty-three years 



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68 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

of age, he was united in marriage to Miss Julia L. Clark, a daughter of Jewett 
and Adeline Clark, of Lorain county. For fourteen years after his marriage, he 
followed his trade as a carpenter and joiner and then turned his attention to the 
work of farming, which has since claimed his time and energies. In 1898, he 
bought his present place of thirty acres in Fitchville township, Huron county, and 
annually gathers good harvests as a reward of the intelligence which he displays 
in the planting and cultivation of his crops. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stone have three children : Roy E., who was born in 1874 and 
completed a course in the Oberlin high school and Moody Institute of Chicago, 
Illinois; Ona M., who is married to Frank Russell of Clarksfield, this county 
and Leon B., who is a teacher in the schools of Fitchville. Both were educated in 
the Fitchville high school. 

In his political views Mr. Stone is a stanch republican, being a firm believer 
in the principles of that party. Both he and his wife are esteemed in their home 
community as people of genuine personal worth, the hospitality of the best homes 
being freely accorded them. 



HARLOW CASE STAHL. 

Among the names of those who stand as the most prominent representatives 
of industrial Ohio, is that of Harlow Case Stahl. Not by leaps or bounds but 
by steady progress that ultimately reaches the objective point has he gained 
his present position, yet his rise has been rapid, owing to his ready recognition 
and intelligent appreciation of opportunities. He early learned to place the cor- 
rect value upon life's contacts and experiences and this, combined with his study 
of trade conditions, has placed him in a position to quickly utilize every oppor- 
tunity and make each moment count to the best advantage. He is today widely 
known as the president and treasurer of the Ohio Cultivator Company and since 
its inception, has been the leading spirit in the enterprise. 

Mr. Stahl was born in a log house on a farm south of Fremont, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 12, 1849, an d as the name indicates is of German descent. His grand- 
father, John Stahl, was born in 1773, and came to the United States at an early 
day. His son, Jacob B. Stahl, the father of our subject, was also born in Ger- 
many and came to Ohio in 1832 at the age of eighteen years. He devoted his life 
to farming and spent his latter years near Fremont, Ohio. On the 21st of De- 
cember, 1 84 1, in Fremont, Ohio, he was married to Rachel E. Camp, who died 
September 5, 1877, while his death occurred January 27, 1883. He was born 
February 10, 1814, and he was, therefore, in the sixty-ninth year of his age at the 
time of his demise. 

After acquiring his preliminary education in the public schools of Fremont, 
Harlow C. Stahl pursued a special business course at Oberlin, Ohio. His youth- 
ful days were largely devoted to the work of the home farm, whereon he remained 
until he attained the age of thirty, at which time he became identified with manu- 
facturing interests in Fremont. The Ohio Cultivator Company, which stands 
today as Bellevue's largest industry, was established on a very small s *le at 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 71 

Fremont in 1878. Mr. Stahl's mechanical ingenuity and his recognition of needs 
in the agricultural world that might be met through invention and manufacture, 
led him to take up the work of building cultivators, and his first year's output 
amounted to eighty-one machines, which were practically manufactured and 
marketed by him with the assistance of a local blacksmith. Up to that time, no 
successful riding cultivator had ever been placed upon the market and the first 
year's output was disposed of to farmers in the immediate vicinity of Fremont. 
The machines met with such unbounded success that their popularity was soon 
heralded in the neighboring counties so that it was possible for Mr. Stahl to 
find ready sale for two hundred cultivators in the second year. They were manu- 
factured throughout the winter months in the blacksmith shop and when the 
spring trade cpened were trailed behind a wagon and retailed to the farmers 
personally by Mr. Stahl. His keen prescience enabled him to recognize the pos- 
sibilities of this piece of farm machinery and the necessity for increased capital 
prompted him to form a partnership under the name of Stahl & Peck. Origin- 
ally, they conducted a feed store in connection with their manufacturing busi- 
ness, but the rapid increase of the trade led to the concentration of their energies 
upon manufacturing lines and this step toward expansion was rapidly followed 
by the organization of a stock company known as the Fremont Cultivator Com- 
pany. From the beginning the growth of the business has been rapid and sub- 
stantial, so much so that in 1886, enlarged quarters had to be secured. At that 
time negotiations were opened with the citizens at Bellevue for a location which 
terminated in the Fremont Cultivator Company's leaving its cramped quarters and 
removing to Bellevue. Soon afterward the business was reorganized under the 
name of the Ohio Cultivator Company, and although the new location gave them 
at the time much needed manufacturing facilities, this condition lasted for only a 
short time, as the increasing popularity of the famous Ohio cultivator was ex- 
tending into the corn belts of the west. The growing trade demanded additions 
to the factory and the main building was converted into a three-story structure, 
ifter which a foundry was built, for up to that time both grey iron and malleable 
ivas purchased under contract from foundries in Cleveland. 

While increasing the factory facilities, it was also found advisable to increase 
the line of machines and as a result the disc harrow business of the Dayton Farm 
Implement Company was purchased and removed to this place and made a part 
of the famous Ohio line. From that time, the growth of the business was very 
rapid and nearly every year has been marked by new additions being built to the 
factory and modern machinery being installed throughout all departments of the 
plant. The next important addition to the line of implements as well as to the 
plant of the cultivator company was the purchase of the buildings and equipment 
of the Bellevue Plow Company, whose property adjoined that of the cultivator 
company, lying on the opposite side of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 
Railroad tracks. This gave to the cultivator company, one of the largest and 
strongest lines of small tools manufactures in the country and, with the increased 
and available capital at their command, this plant immediately entered upon a 
new and even more successful era. A few years later followed the purchase of 
the patents, good will, etc., of the Ohio Hay Press Company, whose product 
was at the time limited to but one style of press — a steam or belt power hay 



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72 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

press. To this has been added a full and complete line of one and two horse 
presses that have rapidly sprung into favor with the progressive hay balers 
throughout the United States. This branch of the business within a few years 
has developed to mammoth proportions until a large two-story building, one hun- 
dred and thirty by eighty feet, is now utilized for its conduct. Later came the 
purchase of the Bissell chilled plows, manufactured by the Bissell Plow Com- 
pany of South Bend, Indiana. With the removal of this business to Bellevue 
the old foundry capacity soon reached its limit and a new foundry was placed 
in course of construction, ranking today as one of the largest and most modern 
foundries in Ohio. An entirely new power plant was put in operation in the 
summer of 1909, being driven by electricity and furnishing the power for every 
department cf the works. With the purchase of the Bissell plow came a largely 
increased foreign trade for the output had been successfully introduced into 
European markets. No other agricultural implement factory in this country has 
enjoyed so rapid and substantial a growth as the Ohio Cultivator Company and 
throughout the entire period at its head, controlling and directing its interests, has 
stood H. C. Stahl. Branch houses have been established throughout the country, 
the company maintaining transfer stocks at Philadelphia ; Rochester, New York ; 
Richmond, Virginia ; Columbus, Ohio ; Lexington, Kentucky ; Indianapolis, In- 
diana; Peoria, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa ; Des Moines, Iowa ; Wichita, Kansas ; and Kansas City, Missouri. 
The company owns its own building in Council Bluffs, Iowa, where the business 
has outgrown the facilities of the average transfer or distributing house of agri- 
cultural implements and the business is conducted under a branch house man- 
agement. At Kansas City, another large implement center, the company main- 
tains a branch house manager together with an efficient corps of traveling men, 
as is done at Council Bluffs. At Dallas, Texas, the business reached such propor- 
tions that it was deemed advisable to purchase a warehouse, which was secured 
several years ago. Throughout these years of expansion and advancement, H. 
C. Stahl has always been at the head, managing and directing the affairs of the 
company to its present successful proportions. The capital stock has from time 
to time been increased until it is recorded today at one million dollars. More- 
over, the enterprise has been one of. immense value to Bellevue where, through- 
out the busy season in normal years, the factory has as high as three hundred men 
upon its pay roll, approximately one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars 
being paid to the employes. As his associate officers, Mr. Stahl, who is presi- 
dent and treasurer, has A. C. Stahl as vice-president; E. A. King, secretary; C. 
V. Brown, assistant secretary ; J. E. Marvin, auditor ; A. C. Dann, superintend- 
ent ; and Dan Seltzer, assistant superintendent. 

Mr. Stahl's hand is also the guiding factor in other enterprises, although the 
interests of the Ohio Cultivator Company claim the greater portion of his time, 
attention and energies. He is the president of the Bellevue Savings Bank, is 
president of the Harrah State Bank, of Harrah, Oklahoma, and is interested in 
various other organizations. He is likewise the owner of several farms in the 
immediate vicinity of Bellevue and has considerable land in other sections of the 
country. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 73 

On the 2 1 st of October, 1874, in Southbury, New Haven county, Connecti- 
cut, Mr. Stahl was married to Miss Annie C. Mitchell of that place, a daughter 
of Nelson Warren and Edna Eliza (Piatt) Mitchell, who were also natives of 
Connecticut. Her father married and took his bride to his father's home, there 
living for fifty years. The old home is still in possession of the Mitchell family. 
The great-grandfather of Mrs. Stahl was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Stahl have been born four children : Edna Rachel, now the 
wife of Joseph E. Marvin, of Bellevue, Ohio; Alice Emeline, the wife of Dan- 
iel Seltzer of Bellevue ; Marion Belle, the wife of Henry N. Schofield of Dallas, 
Texas ; and Harlow Mitchell, who was born June 22, 1893, and is now attending 
the Culver Military College at Culver, Indiana. 

Mr. Stahl is a member of the Masonic fraternity, while his political allegiance 
is given to the republican party. A public spirit and marked philanthropy are 
strong characteristics of his nature and are manifest in his active aid and co- 
operation with every movement tending toward the development and improvement 
of Bellevue. His life work is notable by reason of the fact that without any es- 
pecially favoring advantages at the outset of his career, he has worked his way 
steadily upward, meriting the prosperity that he has enjoyed and which has led 
him into the most important industrial relations. He is honored and respected for 
what he has accomplished and none the less so for the means which he has em- 
ployed for the attainment of his success. 



GEORGE H. GATES. 



George H. Gates, who is serving efficiently as court bailiff of Huron county, 
is a native son of the Buckeye state, born in Newark, Ohio, May 26, 1858, his 
parents being Jacob and Rose (Chamberlin) Gates. The father was an engineer 
on the Pan Handle Railroad and was killed at Coshocton the morning prior to 
Thanksgiving day of 1872. 

George H. Gates, the subject of this review, pursued his early education in 
the common schools and attended the Newark high school one year. Upon the 
death of his father, it was necessary that he provide for his own support, and ac- 
cordingly he secured employment with S. A. Parr, a grocer of Newark, driving 
a delivery wagon and clerking in the store. At the age of nineteen years, he en- 
tered the employ of Cherry & Woolson, proprietors of the eating house of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company at Chicago Junction and Garrett, Indiana, 
remaining in their employ fifteen years. 

Entering public life, Mr. Gates then served as deputy under Sheriff N. O. 
Allen, four years, while for a similar period, he acted in the same capacity under 
Sheriff Seneca Rouk. He was then, in 1900, elected sheriff of Huron county on the 
republican ticket and was re-elected to that office in 1902, which indicated that his 
services were entirely satisfactory to the public at large. After the expiration of 
his second term, he was appointed court bailiff and is the present incumbent in 
that office. He is well qualified to fill the office to the satisfaction of his people 
and with credit to himself, as he has demonstrated in the past. 



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74 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Gates wedded Miss Lizzie A. Wilcox, of Centerton, Ohio, and their union 
has been blessed with a son and a daughter, Louis W., and Helen M. The family 
are prominent in the social circles of Nor walk, and all who know them entertain for 
them high regard, while as a public official, Mr. Gates has won the confidence of 
all with whom his business relations bring him in contact. 



CALVERT A. MEAD. 



A well developed and highly improved farm of ninety-three acres, situated 
within two miles and a half of the courthouse in Norwalk, is not only the present 
home of Calvert A. Mead, but was the place of his birth and here his entire life 
has been spent. He was born in a log house on this farm, June 9, 1834, and is 
the youngest in a family of ten children born of the marriage of Edmund W. 
Mead and Rachel Knapp. The former was born April 4, 1788, while the birth of 
the latter occurred February 14, 1790. They were married October 2, 1813, and 
it was in 1828, that Edmund W. Mead, with his family, then consisting of wife 
and six children, left their home in Putnam county, New York, and located in 
Huron county. Four years later, in 1832, the father took up his abode upon the 
farm which is now the home of his son Calvert A. He followed farming through- 
out his entire life, was industrious and prudent in his manner of living, and thus 
acquired a good farm. He eventually retired to private life, spending his last 
days in Norwalk, where his death occurred April 5, 1876, when he had reached 
the extreme old age of eighty-eight years. He was a republican in politics and 
was highly respected in the community in which he so long made his home. The 
family of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund W. Mead numbered nine children, as follows: 
Jane E., who was born April 28, 1814; Elizabeth A., born February 26, 1816; 
Susan, bom May 11, 1818; Silas K., November 19, 1820; Almira, born February 
13, 1823; Alfred G., July 12, 1825; Rachel, born April 5, 1829; Charles E., Jan- 
uary 14, 1832; and Calvert A., born June 9, 1834. The last three named were 
born after the removal of the family to Huron county. 

Calvert A. Mead, as above stated, was born on the farm which is still his home. 
As as boy, he was reared *to agricultural pursuits and has made farming his life 
work. He has improved his place with good substantial buildings, having a com- 
fortable residence and ample outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock. The 
place, comprising ninety-three acres, is conveniently located within two and a 
half miles of the courthouse in Norwalk. Near the house is a natural spring of 
water, supplying a small lake, which has been dug by Mr. Mead. He has stocked 
this with fish and it also affords a place for rowing, which adds greatly to the 
pleasure of the family and their friends, during the heated season. He formerly 
gave much of his attention to dairying, supplying a large number of patrons with 
milk, but he has abandoned this branch of his business and now gives his entire 
time to the cultivation of crops. 

Mr. Mead chose as a companion and helpmate for the journey of life, Miss 
Ellen Mesnard, who was born April 30, 1836, their marriage being celebrated in 
1857. Her father, Eri Mesnard, was of French descent and served as standard 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 75 

county surveyor of Huron county for fourteen years. He surveyed the first rail- 
road in the state of New York and in early life, engaged in teaching school in 
Ithaca, that state. His death occurred in 1879, an< i his wife survived for two 
years, passing away in 1881. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Mead has been blessed with six sons and one 
daughter, namely: Charles W., Byron L., Albert S., Gertrude Louella, Clayton 
B., Henry B. and Frank L., but the last named died in 1893. The surviving mem- 
bers- of the family are all married. Mr. and Mrs. Mead celebrated their fiftieth 
wedding anniversary in 1907, the date being the 24th of March. One peculiar 
feature on that occasion was the fact that out of a party of twenty-three, who 
sat together at the table, there was one guest present at the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Mead. 

Mr. Mead has always been a stanch supporter of the republican party. A man 
of high ideals and manly principles, he is greatly respected in the community in 
which he has always resided, and through the companionship of his estimable 
wife and the pleasant surroundings of his rural home, he is enabled to live a con- 
tended and happy life. 



HENRY T. GRAHAM. 



Enterprise, industry, thrift and economy are the characteristic elements in the 
life of Henry T. Graham, who is numbered among the substantial agriculturists 
of Fairfield township, where he owns and operates a well improved farm of one 
hundred and two acres. His birth occurred in Greenfield township, Huron county, 
on the 22d of July, 1862, his parents being George and Elizabeth (Myers) Gra- 
ham, the former born in Durham county, England, on the 31st of May, 1836, while 
the latter's birth occurred in England in August, 1836. They were married ere 
their ^migration to the United States in 1859 and on landing in this country at 
once made their way to Huron county, Ohio, settling in Greenfield township. 
There the father continued to make his home until called to his final rest. The 
mother still survives, however, and now resides in Norwalk, Ohio. Unto this 
worthy couple were born four children, namely: Henry T., Anna, Elizabeth and 
George. 

General agricultural pursuits have claimed the attention of Henry T. Graham 
throughout his entire business career and in this field of labor, he has met with 
well merited and commendable prosperity. He remained a resident of his native 
township until 1900, when he purchased a farm of one hundred and two acres in 
Fairfield township and took up his abode thereon. He raises the cereals best 
adapted to soil and climate and each year gathers abundant harvests a^s a reward 
for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life, Mr. Graham chose Miss 
Grace Ryerson, who was born in February, 1871, her parents being George and 
Catherine (Edsall) Ryerson. She was one of a family of nine children, her 
brothers and sisters being as follows : Price, Edsall, George, Delno, Esther, Sarah, 
Dora and Catherine. Mr. and Mrs. Ryerson were natives of New Jersey, but be- 



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76 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

came residents of Huron county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Graham have one child, 
Edsall, who first opened his eyes to the light of the day on the 4th of January, 
1896. 

Mr. Graham's study of the political questions and issues of the day, has led 
him to give stalwart support to the men and measures of the republican party. 
He is now serving as a member of the school board, the cause of education ever 
finding in him a stanch champion. He likewise holds membership relations with 
the Fairfield Grange. Mis entire life has been passed in this community, and the 
fact that those who have known him longest, entertain for him the warmest re- 
gard is an indication that his life has ever been honorable and upright. 



CHARLES A. McCULLOW. 

The prosperity of any community, town or city depends upon its commercial 
activity, its industrial interests and its trade relations, and therefore among the 
builders of a town are those who stand at the head of the business enterprises. 
Prominent among those who are closely identified with the business activity of 
Greenwich, is Charles A. McCullow, a native of Huron county, Ohio, born 
in Greenwich township on the 20th of September, 1857, a son of Joseph E. 
and Agnes (Bartlett) McCullow. The father, who was but four years of age 
when he accompanied his parents on their removal from New Jersey to Ohio, de- 
voted his entire life to farming pursuits and passed away on the 1st of April, 1900. 
His wife, whose parents were also natives of New Jersey, was born in Huron 
county, Ohio, and her death occurred in i860. But one child came to bless this* 
union, the subject of this review. 

Charles A. McCullow acquired his education in the public schools of Green- 
wich and his boyhood and youthful days were passed on his father's farm, in 
the performance of the tasks that commonly fall to the lot of the country lad. He 
remained at home assisting his father until eighteen years of age, when he became 
a clerk in the general store of Healey & Travis, continuing this relation for two 
years. At the expiration of that period, he went to Cleveland, where he clerked 
in the store of Louis Leon for one year. 

On the 23d of November, 1881, he was united in marriage to Miss Lovezilla 
L. Riblet, a daughter of David and Caroline (Mathias) Riblet, of Galion, Ohio, 
and unto this union has been born one daughter, Mabel, now Mrs. D. L. Webb, of 
Greenwich. Mr. and Mrs. McCullow began their domestic life in Greenwich, 
where he became identified with the clothing business, in which he has contin- 
uously engaged to the present time. He carries a very complete and high grade line 
of mens' clothing and furnishings and the amount of business transacted over the 
counters of his store has already reached gratifying proportions and is constantly 
increasing in volume and importance. His place of business is one of the finest 
in the town and would be a credit to a city many times the size of Greenwich, while 
he is recognized as one of the substantial and prosperous citizens of the com- 
munity. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 77 

Not only because of his success in the business world, however, is Mr. Mc- 
Cullow deserving of mention in this volume, for he is equally well known through 
his deep interest in public affairs and occupies a prominent position in political 
circles of his township. He gives his political support to the republican party and 
although neither desiring nor seeking office as a reward for party fealty, he has, 
nevertheless, been called by his fellowmen to fill positions of trust and respon- 
sibility in the township, which he has represented in the republican county com- 
mittee for many years and has frequently acted as a delegate to district, county 
and state conventions. He served as township treasurer for two terms and as 
village clerk for several years, was a member of the board of trustees of the water 
works for several terms and served for some time as a member of the board of 
public service, in which capacity he is still acting. He has also been a member 
of the village board of education for several years, the cause of education finding 
in him a stalwart champion. 

Fraternally, Mr. McCullow is a member of Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, F. & 
A. M., and has filled most of the chairs of that lodge, while he also holds member- 
ship in O. K. Lodge, No. 616, K. P., and is a charter member and treasurer of the 
lodge. He belongs to the Brotherhood of American Yeomen and is a charter 
member of the Eagle Lodge, No. 22, National Union. His devotion to the public 
welfare is unquestioned, arising as it does from a sincere desire for the general 
good. He lends his influence to all movements calculated to advance the public 
interests and is particularly strong in his advocacy of improvements of the town 
streets, public buildings and water works. He is very fond of fishing and hunt- 
ing and as a recreation and relaxation from his work he takes annual trips into 
the woods and along the streams in the pursuit of his favorite pastimes. How- 
ever, he is eminently a man of business, never permitting any interruption to dis- 
tract his attention from his duties, and his close application and good management 
are potent factors in the prosperity which he now enjoys. Mrs. McCullow is a 
lady of superior traits of character and presides over her home, which is one of 
the handsomest in the town of Greenwich, in a charming manner, imparting 
thereto an atmosphere of refinement and culture which makes it an important 
factor in the social life of the community. 



JAMES P. LIMBIRD. 



A farm of seventy-eight acres in Ridgefield township, Huron county, pays, 
tribute to the care and attention bestowed upon it by its owner, James P. Limbird. 
He was born near Kimball, Erie county, Ohio, on the 1st of February, 1861, and 
is a son of David and Mary P. (Adams) Limbird. His father, who was born 
in Lincolnshire, England, in 1834, came to the United States, landing at New 
York on July 6, 1852. Continuing his way westward, he located in Erie county, 
Ohio, where he worked for one year, hoeing corn, at first receiving but fifty cents 
per day in return for his labor. At the expiration of that period, he went to Van 
Wert county, Ohio, but in the spring of 1856, returned to Erie county and later 
went to California, where he was engaged in mining and ranching for some time. 



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78 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

In June, 1859, during the great frost, he returned to the middle west and located 
in Illinois, where he resided for a short time, and then purchased a farm of eighty 
acres near Kimball, Erie county, Ohio. On the 19th of January, i860, he married 
Miss Mary P. Adams, a daughter of John and Anna Adams, and in their family 
were three children: George, deceased; Olive, who has also passed away; and 
James P., of this review. Mrs. Limbird, also a native of Lincolnshire, England, 
was born December 5, 1835. She and her husband still survive and make their 
home near the subject of this record. David Limbird, had four brothers who 
served in the Civil war : Anthony, Mark, Richard and James. 

Reared under the parental roof, James P. Limbird is indebted to the common- 
school system for the education which he acquired. He also early learned the 
best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting through assisting his father, 
and upon attaining his majority, he wisely decided to make the occupation to which 
he had been reared, his life wok. He continued to engage in farming in Erie 
county, until 1907, in which year he purchased his present place from the Bogardus 
estate. His farm consists of seventy-eight acres of finely improved land with 
substantial buildings' upon it and the excellent appearance which the place pre-' 
sents is indicative of the care and labor expended upon it by its owner. His en- 
tire time and attention are devoted to the farm and his business interests are 
bringing him a gratifying financial return. 

Mr. Limbird was united in marriage November 24, 1895, to Miss Anna Moos, 
a daughter of Edward and Mary Moos, of Erie county, Ohio, and unto this union 
have been born seven children, of whom Ruth*, Grace, James, Helen and Arthur 
still survive, the others passing away in infancy. Mr. Limbird holds membership 
in the Congregational church, of which he was a trustee for a number of years and 
to the support of which he is a liberal contributor. He is a man highly esteemed 
in the community, his good qualities of heart and mind gaining the warm friend- 
ship of many with whom he has come in contact. 



SEELEY BURDETT PALMER. 

Seeley Burdett Palmer, a retired agriculturist residing in Norwalk, was 
born in Fitchville, Huron county, Ohio, on the 29th of May, 1848. Being reared 
on the old homestead farm, he early became familiar with the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist and continued to assist his father in the 
cultivation of the fields until nineteen years of age. He then became connected 
with the building department of the Western Union Telegraph Company, putting 
up wires and working in the eastern part of the United States and Novia Scotia. 
He was also employed on the construction of the line from St. Louis to Toledo 
and subsequently worked for Jay Gould in the same capacity for a year and a 
half. He has a very fine gold watch, chain and charm which were presented to 
his brother-in-law, D. Doran, by Jay Gould and given to Mr. Palmer by his sis- 
ter at the time of her husband's death. After leaving the employ of Mr. Gould, 
our subject resumed the work of general farming, with which line of activity 
he was successfully identified until the time of his retirement from active busi- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 81 

ness life in 1907. He retains possession of the old family homestead of three 
hundred and fifty acres, which is still under his management and is also the 
owner of some real estate in Cleveland. On putting aside the active work of the 
fields, he purchased a lot in Norwalk and erected thereon a handsome brick resi- 
dence, in which he has since made his home, enjoying in well earned ease, the 
fruits of his former toil. His energy, economy and perseverance constituted the 
basis of the prosperity which has crowned his labors and he has long been num- 
bered among the most substantial, enterprising and respected citizens of his native 
county. 

Mr. Palmer has been married twice, the first union being with Miss Iola 
Martin, whose birth occurred in the year 1859. She passed away in January, 
1876, leaving a daughter, Dora, who is now the wife of Hal Amsden. For his 
second wife, Mr. Palmer chose Miss Elizabeth Chase, whom he wedded on the 
1st of May, 1878. Unto them were born the following children. S. Burdett, Jr., 
who was born November 13, 1879, married Miss Lena May Jennings and now 
follows merchandising at Fitchville, where he is also serving as postmaster. 
Benjamin Chase, who was born April 7, 1881, and married' Miss Catherine Kron- 
enbitter, is now manager of the Antiseptic Telephone Company of Los Angeles, 
California. D. Doran, who was born August 27, 1884, married Miss Evalina 
White. He was formerly a bookkeeper in the Huron County Bank for three 
years, but is now engaged in general farming. Lucy Thelma, whose birth oc- 
curred on the 25th of October, 1886, gave her hand in marriage to Edwin Mar- 
tin Thoma. All of these children obtained their education in Fitchville and the 
sons are graduates of the Sandusky Business College. 

Politically Mr. Palmer is a stalwart republican and has capably served his 
fellow townsmen in the capacity of trustee for several years. He likewise acted 
as a member of the school board for a long period and has ever been a helpful 
friend of the cause of public instruction. Fraternally, he is identified with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is likewise a valued member of the 
Congregational church, conforming his life to its teachings. At all times his life 
has been active, useful and honorable and it is his genuine personal worth that 
has gained for him the favorable position which he occupies in the regard of 
those who know him. 

William Chase, the father of Mrs. Palmer, was born in Hunter, Green county, 
New York, in June, 1809, and was a brother of the man who is at the head of the 
Chase Piano Company. It was in 1835 that he came to Ohio and settled in Fitch- 
ville township, Huron county, making that his permanent home. He always took 
a great interest in public affairs, holding many responsible positions in the com- 
munity where he resided, and in the administration of the different offices of trust 
that he was called upon to fill, he made a fine reputation, and as a business man 
was imbued with high principles and sterling integrity. He was twice married, 
his first union being with Pemelia Wolcott, whom he wedded in 1836 and by 
whom he had three children, namely : Alvin B. ; Mary F. ; and Watson D. Both 
sons enlisted in the Union army during the Civil war, Alvin B. serving for four 
years with General Sherman, being with that general on his famous march to 
the sea. Watson D. enlisted in 1864 and served until hostilities ceased, both con- 
tracting diseases caused by continuous exposure to all kinds of weather and the 



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82 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

hardships incidental to the life of the soldiers, which hastened their deaths in 
future years. The mother of these children died in 1849 an( l * n ^o, at Norwalk, 
Ohio, Mr. Chase was united in marriage to Miss Betsy A. Jump, who had come 
to this city in 1836. After finishing her education in a seminary under the in- 
struction of the Rev. E. and Mrs. Thompson, she engaged in teaching school in 
Norwalk until her marriage to Mr. Chase, then going with him to Fitchville, 
where they toiled together, making for themselves a pleasant and happy home. 
At that time sewing machines were not in vogue and she spun, cut and made the 
fabrics into garments for her family. She was not only the seamstress and maid 
of all work in her own home, but her duties as a wife and mother were always 
performed with untiring zeal and energy. She was one of the many ladies that 
helped to prepare boxes of clothing and food for the soldiers who were fighting 
for their country in the south. By his second marriage Mr. Chase had two 
children, but Ella E., who was born in 1856, died in 1883, the only survivor being 
Elizabeth, now Mrs. Palmer, who was born in 1859. The parents were both 
earnest and consistent members of the Second Congregational church of Fitch- 
ville, taking an active interest in religious work, Mr. Chase serving as deacon 
up to the time of his death and his wife acting as teacher in the Sunday school. 
He passed away June 17, 1888, on the seventy-ninth anniversay of his birth. 
After his death, Mrs. Chase remained on the old homestead for about three 
years and then went to live with her daughter, Mrs. Palmer, dying at her home 
on the 28th of July, 1893. 



GEORGE GATES. 



George Gates, one of Greenfield township's native sons and the owner of one 
hundred and thirty-three acres of land, was born on the nth of June, 1859. His 
parents, George and Catherine (Ronk) Gates, were both born in Germany, the 
father March 14, 1825, the mother March 3, 1824, and there they grew to maturity 
and were married. Shortly after their union, they came to the United States and 
about 1850, went to Zanesville, Ohio, where they lived for a short time and then 
located in Greenfield township, Huron county. The father was a stonemason by 
trade, and for a few years after his arrival in this country worked in the quarry at 
the old Lodi Mill, which was not far from the place he had selected for a home. In 
1868, he bought a small tract of land in Peru township, which he sold three years 
later to buy one hundred and eighty acres adjoining it in the northern part of 
Greenfield township. This second farm remained his home until his death, which 
occurred on the 3d of October, 1875. He was a consistent member of the Catholic 
church of the German settlement in Peru township, living up as best he could to 
its teachings. Mrs. Gates still survives her husband and makes her home with her 
daughter, Mrs. John Schaffer, of Bronson township, Huron county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gates had eight children: Nicholas A., born December 18, 1850, and Frank 
J., born November 2, 1852, both of whom are residents of this township ; Mary, 
born September 8, 1864, the wife of Philip Barman, of Peru township ; William, 
born May 20, 1857, a resident of Greenfield township; George, of this sketch; 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 83 

Julia, born June 21, 1862, now deceased, who was the wife of Delmar C. Burdge; 
Rose, born July 17, 1864, the wife of John Shaffer, of Bronson township; and 
Henry, who was born October 19, 1868, and died August 11, 1895. 

Greenfield township, the place of his nativity, has been George Gates's heme 
through the greater part of his life. From the public schools of the district he ob- 
tained a knowledge of the fundamental branches of an English education and at 
home received the much more practical schooling for the life of a farmer to which 
he was to devote himself. At the age of twenty-nine he married and made a home 
for himself, but it was not until 1905, that he bought his present farm, having in 
the intervening years tilled the soil and reaped the harvests of land that he rented. 
He procured his farm from Ernest Chambers, a well improved tract that is ex- 
cellently adapted to the general farming that Mr. Gates conducts there. He is a 
public spirited citizen as well as a good farmer, taking especial interest in the 
cause of education, which he has served in his district as a member of the school 
board. 

On the 17th of January, 1888, at the Bismarck Catholic church Father Titter- 
ist pronounced the words that made Mr. Gates and Miss Catherine Hosman man 
and wife in the eyes of the church and of the law. Mrs. Gates was born in Norwich 
township, Huron county, February 26, 1864, and is a daughter of Henry and Anna 
(Weisler) Hosman, both natives of Germany, who shortly after their marriage 
in that land came to Huron county, Ohio. They settled first in Peru township, and 
then in Norwich township, which remained their home until their death. The 
father, who was born July 14, 1828, died November 7, 1904, and the mother, whose 
birth occurred July 26, 1826, died on the nth of October, 1898. They were the 
parents of six children: Mary A., born April 15, i860; Henry J., born January 20, 
1862; Catherine, now Mrs. Gates; William J., born March 10, 1866; Joseph E., 
born November 26, 1868; and Albert J., born March n, 1870. 

Of Mr. and Mrs. Gates's union there have been born three children: Rose 
Bell, born June 25, 1889; Charles B., born January 25, 1893; anc * Grace, born 
August 14, 1895. All live at home. Mr. Gates and his family are members of the 
Catholic church, but in political matters he is not guided by any party, preferring 
to regard questions of importance from all sides and cast his influence or vote 
as seems to him right. 



GEORGE BARGUS. 



George Bargus, whose life history constitutes a fair record of responsibilities 
wisely carried, great opportunities turned to the best account, patriotism inspired 
by a heart loyal to his country in her time of need, is one of Huron county's most 
prominent citizens and a director in the Huron County Bank, at Norwalk, al- 
though he is now living retired in Townsend township. He was born in Newark. 
New Jersey, April 29, 1839, his parents being William and Charlotte (Argyle) 
Bargus, the father a native of New Jersey and of German Extraction, and the 
mother a native of Scotland. Left an orphan in infancy, George Bargus was 
at an early age thrown upon his own resources. His education, which was ac- 



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84 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

quired in the district schools of New Jersey, was superficial and inadequate, al- 
though later, he succeeded in acquiring a good, practical English education and 
this, coupled with his natural ability to cope with intricate business problems, un- 
tiring energy and keen sagacity, enabled him to win success in every undertaking. 
He is largely self-educated, acquiring a remarkably wide range of information 
from his reading and study. From earliest youth, he maintained an unbounded 
faith in humanity, finding much to interest him in the newspapers, magazines and 
his own well supplied library. 

When thirteen years of age, Mr. Bargus went to Rochester, New York, where 
he learned the baker's and confectioner's trade, there serving an apprenticeship of 
four years. He then journeyed westward but, finding no opening for his trade, he 
was glad to work at anything that would provide a means of subsistence. During 
the winter of 1859-60, he traveled through the states of Tennessee, Arkansas and 
Louisiana, but at the opening of the Civil war he returned to the north, enlisting 
in Company E, First Battalion of Yates, Sharpshooters in 1861, which battalion in 
1864 became the Sixty- fourth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was 
mustered in as sergeant, but owing to distinguished service and gallantry at the 
battle of Corinth and in other engagements, he was rapidly promoted through the 
different ranks to first lieutenant. For more than a year, he commanded his com- 
pany and was with his regiment in all its marches and campaigns, participating in 
the battles of New Madrid ; Island No. 10 ; the siege of Corinth ; Resaca, Georgia ; 
Big Shanty; Kenesaw Mountain; Atlanta, July 22 and also on July 28, 1864; 
Ezra's church and numerous minor engagements. He was with General Sher- 
man on his famous march to the sea, and during his service sustained several 
slight wounds. He was mustered out in January, 1865. 

When the war was over, Lieutenant Bargus took a commercial course in Ober- 
lin College, after which he went west for one year, when, on returning to Huron 
county, he settled on a farm in Townsend township, near Collins, where he subse- 
quently engaged in farming and fruit raising. He became a large landowner, his 
farms at one time containing more than four hundred acres, and he yet owns about 
three hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, well improved and under a high 
state of cultivation. For some years, he also owned and operated a sawmill, doing 
a large business in lumber and timber until April, 1890, when his mills were en- 
tirely destroyed by a cyclone. 

On the 1 2th of April, 1866, Mr. Bargus was united in marriage to Miss S. 
Alice Humphrey, a daughter of William and Sarah Ann (Bierce) Humphrey, 
natives of Litchfield county, Connecticut. To this union were born four children : 
George, deceased; Alvin Dudley; May, deceased; and Edwin Humphrey. The 
wife and mother died in March, 1805, and Mr. Bargus was again married on the 
29th of April, 1896, his second union being with Miss Josie May Ulmer, a daugh- 
ter of Peter and Mary Ulmer. She passed away in April, 1901. 

In his political views, Mr. Bargus is an uncompromising republican and while 
still a youth, became very much interested in the slavery question, his sympathies 
being with the slave. All his life he has been an active party worker, at all times 
being able to defend his position with regard to republican principles. Mr. Bar- 
gus cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln and was a close personal 
friend of the late President McKinley and materially assisted in campaign work 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 85 

in Ohio in 1896 and 1900. He is also a great admirer of Ex-President Roosevelt 
as he is of President Taft. He belongs to no church but he is a firm believer in 
Christianity of the practical kind. He is a member of Townsend Post, No. 414, 
G. A. R., of which he was the first commander and served in that position for 
many years. He also served as general commander of the Fourteenth District 
Brigade and as assistant inspector and aide-de-camp on the department staff, 
G. A. R. of Ohio. He likewise acted as colonel, commanding F. H. Boalt Com- 
mand, No. 17, U. V. U., of Nor walk, Ohio, and as deputy commander of Ohio. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and for several years was worshipful 
master of East Townsend Lodge, No. 322, A. F. & A. M., to which lodge he has 
belonged for over forty years. He is a member of Huron Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M., 
and of Norwalk Commandery, No. 18, K. T. 

Successful and honorable in business, respected and beloved by his fellow 
citizen* and army comrades, Mr. Bargus is now enjoying rest from his former 
business activity, and while he yet maintains a personal supervision over his large 
estate, he spends most of his time in his beautiful country home near Collins. Es- 
pecially interested in literature, he finds his chief recreation in the hours spent in 
his library, which contains many volumes of ancient and modern history, biogra- 
phy and the sciences. A most companionable and kindly man, Mr. Bargus enter- 
tains broad, optimistic views of life, has a genuine faith in mankind and is never 
happier than when giving assistance to those in need who are worthy of that which 
he can give them. To do right for the love of right has ever been his rule of ac- 
tion, and his industry, combined with practical common sense, has brought suc- 
cess to all his efforts. Always cheerful and contented, he has gathered around 
him a circle of friends almost co-extensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



JOSEPH H. GROFF. 



Joseph H. Groff, who now gives his attention to the cultivation of a fine farm 
of one hundred and fifty-five acres in Peru township, is a native of Germany, his 
birth having occurred in Baden on the 6th of February, 1841. His parents, Joseph 
and Grazenaca (Borer) Groff, were likewise natives of the fatherland, the former 
born on the 20th of January, 1812, and the latter on the 4th of February, 1818. 
In 1847, ^ey set sail for the new world and after an ocean voyage of about forty 
days* landed on the shores of this country. They established their home at San- 
dusky, Ohio, and there continued to reside until 1872, when they removed to Cleve- 
land, where they spent their remaining days. The father was called to his final 
rest in 1891 and the mother passed away in February of the previous year. Unto 
this worthy couple were born eight children, namely : Joseph H., of this review ; 
Anna, who is deceased, as is also her husband, Fred Berkley ; Vincent W., a resi- 
dent of Cleveland, Ohio ; Henry, likewise living in Cleveland ; John, whose demise 
occurred when he had attained the age of thirty-seven years ; Louisa, who wedded 
William Gregory, both she and her husband being now deceased; and two who 
died in infancy. 



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86 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Joseph H. Groff, who was a little lad of six years when he accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to the United States, obtained his education in the 
schools of Sandusky. In the evenings and during the periods t>f vacation nc 
learned the trade of a baker and confectioner under the direction of Adam Miller. 
in whose employ he remained after completing his schooling, eventually being 
made foreman of the bakery. At the time of the Civil war, however, he put aside 
all business and personal considerations and on the 14th of August, 1862, at San- 
dusky, enlisted for service in the Union army as a member of Company G, One 
Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was organized at 
Monroeville, Ohio. . The regiment was sent to Virginia and participated in a 
number of hotly contested engagements as well as various skirmishes. At the 
battle of Winchester, from June 13th to 15th inclusive, Mr. Groff was captured 
with four thousand other men and sent to Libby prison, where he was incarcerated 
for about a week and then taken to Belle Isle, there being imprisoned for about 
two months. Later, he was paroled. He saw active service in the battles of Ap- 
picon, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Hatchie's Run, Petersburg, High Bridge rnd 
Appomattox, and when hostilities had ceased, he was mustered out at Camp Chase 
on the 12th of June, 1865. 

Mr. Groff returned home with a most creditable military record and once more 
became identified with the bakery business at Sandusky, which he followed for a 
few years. During his arduous experience as a soldier, he had contracted rheu- 
matism and this at length made it necessary for him to abandon" the bakery busi- 
ness, after which he secured employment with the Sandusky Tool Company, re- 
maining with that concern for several years. From 1873 unt ^ 1891, he capably 
discharged the duties devolving upon him as a member of the police force and 
subsequently wns employed as a conducter and motorman by the Sandusky & 
Norwalk Street Railway Company. He remained with the street car company un- 
til 1899, when he came to Peru township, Huron county, and purchased a farm 
of one hundred and fifty-five acres from John Giger, in the cultivation of which 
he has since been actively and successfully engaged. He has placed a number of 
substantial improvements on the property and now has one of the finest farms in 
this section, the well tilled fields annually returning golden harvests as a reward 
for the care and labor which is bestowed upon them. 

On the 6th of August, 1863, at Sandusky, Ohio, Mr. Groff, was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary Fritz, the wedding ceremony being performed by Father 
N. Mose. Mrs. Groff was born at Alsace, Lorriane, Germany, on the 20th of 
June, 1836. her parents being Mr. and Mrs. John M. Fritz, who took up their abode 
at Frank in Thompson township, Seneca county, Ohio, after coming to this coun- 
try. She was a little maiden of eight years when she left her native land. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Groff were born seven children, as follows: Mary, who died 
in infancy ; Joseph, who wedded Miss Carrie Sherer and lives at Sandusky, 
Ohio; Mary, also a resident of Sandusky, who is the wife of H. S. Arnold, by 
whom she has four children: Mary, Louisa, Walter and Joseph; Catherine and 
Lawrence, who are at home ; Anna, the wife of George Smith, of Sandusky, Ohio; 
and John, who is likewise at home. The wife and mother passed away on the 29th 
of March, 1909, her remains being interred in St. Mary's cemetery at Sandusky, 
where her father also lies buried. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 87 

Mr. Groff still maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through 
his membership in the Grand Army post at Norwalk, Ohio. His religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Catholic church of Sherman township. His 
life has been an active, useful and honorable one and he well merits the respect 
and esteem which are uniformly accorded him. 



SPILLER M. SLY. 



Spiller M. Sly, a farmer of Fitchville township, who has filled several of the 
local offices of government, was born in Milan, Erie county, Ohio, September 15, 
1845, an d is tne s° n of Willard and Martha J. (Laughlin) Sly. 

The mother was born in Gallia county, Ohio, but the father's birthplace was New 
York state. He was but a young man, however, when in 1843, ne came to Ohio 
and commenced farming. In 1845, ne came to Fitchville, township, Huron county, 
where he lived until the excitement consequent to the discovery of gold in Cali- 
fornia aroused a spirit of unrest in his breast. In the spring of 1852, he joined 
the vast army of gold seekers on the overland trail, from which he was destined 
never to return. For four years his family heard from him regularly, and then no 
word at all. It was known that he had engaged extensively in the horse business 
and had bought a large drove of animals which he intended bringing to the eastern 
markets to dispose of, and it is supposed that in crossing the plains, he was at- 
tacked by Indians and murdered. He left a widow and a son, Spiller M., to mourn 
his loss. Mrs. Sly died in September, 1893. 

Spiller M. Sly was reared as a farmer's boy, largely under his mother's guid- 
ance. He attended the county schools during the winter months and made the best 
use of the small opportunities they afforded for obtaining an education. At the 
age of twenty-five, he undertook the responsibilities of a home of his own and pur- 
chased a farm in Fitchville township on which he has lived for the past twenty- 
seven years. It is a splendid tract of land lying just beyond the village of Fitch- 
ville, is well improved and under a fine state of cultivation. On it he pursues 
general farming and raises a large amount of stock. Mr. Sly was one of the 
organizers of the Clinton Air Line Telephone Company in 1903, was one of the 
charter members of the concern and one of its first board of directors. At pres- 
ent, he is vice-president of the company, which has for the past three years had 
the telephone exchange in his house. He has also rendered other valuable serv- 
ice to the people of this township. For twelve years, he filled the position of town- 
ship clerk, an able official, was trustee for three years, and is now and has been 
for many years, a member of the school board. 

On the 15th of March, 1870, was celebrated Mr. Sly's marriage to Miss Josie 
Pierce, the daughter of Philo and Elizabeth (White) Pierce, of Fitchville town- 
ship, where Mr. Pierce engaged in farming. The mother was born here, the 
father in New York state, but both the White and Pierce families were among the 
early settlers in this county and were influential in its affairs and in promoting its 
growth and advancement. Mr. Pierce died June 20, 1901, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to the grave some years, her death having occurred November 29, 1895. 



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88 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

To Mr. and Mrs. Sly have been born four children : John W., who is married and 
is a farmer of Fitchville township ; Elizabeth, the wife of John Buck, of Cleveland, 
Ohio ; Dorothy, now Mrs. William E. Glossup of Louisville, Kentucky ; and Mar- 
guerite, a teacher in the schools of Fitchville. The family are members of the 
Baptist church and are identified closely with its work. 

Mr. Sly is a republican, though he does not take a very active part in political 
affairs. However, he never fails to cast his vote on election day and has on several 
occasions been a delegate to county, district and state conventions. He is a char- 
ter member of Tent No. 125, Knights of the Maccabees, has filled every office of 
the order, and has been otherwise very active in the affairs of the local lodge. In 
the Baptist church, he has for a number of years filled the position of trustee, for 
ne is a man who inspires the confidence of his fellows, and time has proved that 
this reliance is not misplaced. His record as the incumbent of every office has 
been clean, and the public spirit that rules his acts has led him to promote eagerly 
the welfare and advancement of the township. 



ALONZO L. SIMMONS. 

Alonzo L. Simmons, whose demise occurred on the 8th of July, 1908, was long 
numbered among the substantial and leading citizens of Huron county. He was 
born in Greenfield township, this county, on the 6th of December, 1835, and comes 
of good old Revolutionary stock, his paternal great-grandfather, Edward Simmons, 
having served as captain in the Continental line of Massachusetts until the surren- 
der of Yorktown. He was a miller by trade and made his home in Rehoboth, Bris- 
tol county, Massachusetts. In his family were four children: Edward, who set- 
tled in New Hampshire and became a prominent judge ; Noble, a blacksmith, who 
made his home in New York state ; William, who died in Massachusetts ; and Eli- 
phalet B., the grandfather of our subject. The last named was born in Bristol coun- 
ty, Massachusetts, in 1773, and was there reared to manhood, removing to Dela- 
ware county, New York, in 1804. In the latter place he was engaged in the lum- 
ber business for thirteen years' and while a resident there he was married to Miss 
Esther Brown, a daughter of Captain Charles Brown, of New London, Connecticut. 
In 181 7 he started for the Firelands of Ohio, making the trip by wagon, arriving 
here on the 12th of July of that year. He purchased land in Greenfield township, 
Huron county, where as a pioneer he engaged in the improvement and cultivation 
of the land and in the midst of the wilderness developed a fine farm. As time 
passed he prospered in his undertakings and eventually acquired a large property. 
After a useful and well spent life he died at his home in Greenfield township, Jan- 
uary 26, 1836, when in his sixty-third year. He was a democrat in politics and al- 
ways took an active interest in public affairs. He was twice married and had a 
family of four children, namely : Harlon E., Charles B., Albert and Washington L. 

Of this family Harlon E. Simmons was the father of our subject. He was born 
in Rehoboth, Bristol county, Massachusetts, December 14, 1798, and was twenty- 
one years of age when he started for the Firelands, where his father had located two 
years previously. With one Horse and an open wagon he journeyed from Massa- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 91 

chusetts to Ohio, starting in October and arriving in his father's home in Huron 
county in December, 1819, after about six weeks spent on the road. He purchased 
land near his father's home and at once commenced its cultivation and improve- 
ment. In 1827, however, he returned to Massachusetts, where on the 17th of July 
of that year he was married to Miss Ann Ide, a daughter of Joseph Ide, of Attle- 
boro, Bristol county, and accompanied by his bride he then returned to his Ohio 
home. They became the parents of six children, namely: Rufus A., Abby N., L. 
Curtiss, Alonzo L., Emily and Ann. The father passed away March 21, 1875, at 
the age of seventy-seven years, and the mother departed this life on the 30th of 
May, 1877. He took quite an active part in public affairs. The first singing school 
as well as the first choir in Greenfield township was organized under his leadership. 
In politics he was originally a Jacksonian democrat but in 1856, on the organiza- 
tion of the republican party, he joined its ranks. 

Alonzo L. Simmons was reared under the parental roof and obtained his early 
education in the district schools of his home neighborhood. He also attended the 
high school at Norwalk and North Fairfield, and for seven years he engaged in 
teaching during the winter months, while the summers were devoted to the work 
of the farm. He eventually became the owner of several hundred acres of rich and 
productive land, which returned to him a gratifying annual income. In 1871 he 
purchased an interest in the Phoenix gristmill, to the operation and management of 
which he devoted much time and attention throughout the remainder of his active 
business career. He likewise served as the vice-president of the North Fairfield 
Savings Bank until the time of his death and was well known and highly esteemed 
as a most prosperous, progressive and representative citizen of his native county. 
The success which attended his undertakings was entirely the result of his untiring 
industry and capable management and he justly earned the proud American title of 
a self-made man. 

On the 24th of April, 1862, Mr. Simmons was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Elizabeth Minges, who was born in Seneca county, Ohio, on the 28th of Feb- 
ruary, 1842. Her father, John E. Minges, was born in September, 1813, in Fayette 
township, Seneca county, New York, and during his boyhood developed rare me- 
chanical genius, being able to work at several trades. In 1833 he came to Ohio, fol- 
lowing his father, John Minges, who was drowned while crossing Lake Erie, and 
the son came on to Huron county to settle up the estate and take charge of the prop- 
erty. After working for some time on a farm in Greenefild township he removed 
to Seneca county, Ohio, where he purchased land and turned his attention to its de- 
velopment and cultivation. On the 12th of June, 1836, Mr. Minges was united in 
marriage to Miss Margaret Seed, who was born in New York. May 25, 1819, and 
came west with her parents, locating in Venice township, Seneca county. She died 
May 12, 1839, leaving no children, and was buried at Attica, Ohio. Mr. Minges 
was again married April 27, 1841, his second union being with Miss Lydia F. Wil- 
bur, who was born in Cayuga county, New York, January 30, 1820, a daughter of 
Nathan and Esther (LaBarre) Wilbur. In 1826 her parents settled in Sherman 
township, Huron county, where they passed the remainder of their lives. Their 
children were : Caroline E. ; Sarah Jane ; Esther Cornelia ; John ; and Emeline E. 
The children born to John E. and Lydia F. Minges were : Margaret E., the widow of 
Alonzo L. Simmons, of this review ; Flora M., the wife of Frank Marriott, a law- 



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92 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

yer of Delaware, Ohio ; and Dessie M., the wife of George A. Waggaman, a broker 
of New York city. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Marriott are : John Minges ; Wil- 
bur McClellan; Florence Dale; Francis Marion; and Merrick Joy. In 1855 M f - 
Minges returned to Huron county and located in North Fairfield village. He had 
previously engaged in merchandising at Attica and in this county he continued to 
carry on the same business for some time before establishing himself on a farm in 
Greenfield in 1858. Ten years later he removed to Peru township, where he was 
variously employed until his death, which occurred on the 26th of January, 1885. 
He was widely known as an active and enterprising citizen and had the respect and 
confidence of all with whom he came in contact. His political support was given 
to the republican party and prior to the Civil war he was a stanch abolitionist, carry- 
ing his principles into practice by harboring fugitive slaves. In religious faith 
he was a Wesleyan Methodist. 

In his political views Mr. Simmons was a stanch republican and for a num- 
ber of years served as trustee in both Greenfield and Fairfield townships. He was 
a great lover of music and, being a vocalist of considerable ability, his services as a 
singer were much in demand at social gatherings. His death, which occurred on 
the 8th of July, 1908, when he had attained the age of seventy-two years, was the 
occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had an extensive circle of friends 
throughout this county, where his entire life was spent. His widow still survives 
and is now very comfortably situated financially. She is a gentle, kindly wo- 
man, charitable in her estimate of every one and her many excellent traits of heart 
and mind have won fcr her the esteem and admiration of a host of warm friends. 



AUGUST BORES. 



August Bores has found in the rich, fertile soil of Huron county ample scope 
for his activities, and in the years that have come and gone has accumulated a val- 
uable property, comprising one hundred and twenty-six acres of land in Sherman 
township, on which he resides, while he also owns another farm of one hundred 
and eighty-six acres in the same township. His birth occurred in Pontiac, Huron 
county, Ohio, on the 1st of March, 1862, his parents being David and Anna Marie 
(Fauchinger) Bores. His paternal grandparents, John and Catherine (Klepel) 
Bores, spent their entire lives in Germany. The grandfather was a soldier in the 
German army and participated in the war with France, fighting against Napoleon. 
Unto him and his wife were born fiwe children, namely: John; Louis; Elizabeth; 
David ; and Minnie, who is now the wife of Philip Thoma, an agriculturist of 
Peru township, this county. The two last named are the only members of the 
family who crossed the Atlantic and established their home in the United States. 

David Bores, the father of August Bores, was born in Germany on the 22d 
of January, 1833, and made the voyage to this country in the year 1853, * n con> 
pany with his sister Minnie. After landing in New York, he at once made his way 
to Ridgefield township, Huron county, Ohio, where for three years he worked by 
the month as a farm hand. About 1856, he rented a tract of land and was success- 
fully and energetically engaged in its operation for a period of six years. By 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 93 

dint of close economy and careful expenditure, he at length accumulated capital 
sufficient with which to purchase a farm of his own and eventually became recog- 
nized as one of the substantial and enterprising agriculturists as well as represen- 
tative citizens of the community. He now owns a well improved farm of two 
hundred and forty acres in Sherman township, which annually returns to him a 
gratifying income. His political allegiance is given to the democracy and he has 
served as road supervisor and also as trustee of Sherman township, holding the 
latter position for twelve years. In the year 1855, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna Marie Fauchinger, a native of Germany, who came to the United 
States in company with her brother Joseph. They became the parents of six child- 
ren, as follows : Joseph, who is now deceased ; Elizabeth, the wife of C. Wilhelm ; 
Henry ; August, of this review ; John ; and Emma, who is the wife of William 
Ringlein. 

August Bores, whose name introduces this record, obtained his education in 
the district schools and early in life became familiar with the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist through the assistance which he rendered 
his father in the cultivation of the home farm. He has always given his atten- 
tion to the work of the fields and that his efforts in this direction have met with 
success is indicated by the fact that he is now the owner of two well improved 
and valuable farms in Sherman township, comprising one hundred and twenty- 
six and one hundred and eighty-six acres of land respectively. 

On the 1st of June, 1886, Mr. Bores was joined in wedlock to Miss Helen 
Bauman, a daughter of John and Barbara Bauman, whose family numbered 
three children, as follows : Emma, the wife of Anthony Hammersmith ; Mary, who 
gave her hand in marriage to Henry Bores, a brother of our subject ; and Helen, 
now Mrs. August Bores. The mother of these children has passed away. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bores now have five children : Otto, who was born in 1887 » Alpha, whose 
birth occurred in 1889 ; Rosa, born in 1891 ; August, in 1893 J ar| d Arthur, in 1900. 

Like his father, Mr. Bores is a stalwart advocate of the principles of the demo- 
cratic party and has served as a member of the school board and also in the posi- 
tion of road supervisor. Fraternally, he is identified with the Knights of Colum- 
bus at Monroeville, Ohio, in which organization his sons, Otto and Alpha, also hold 
membership. The different members of the family all belong to the Catholic 
church. Throughout the county in which his entire life has been spent, Mr. Bore* 
is well and favorably known, having wion the kindly esteem and regard of all 
with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact. 



PRICE VENOSTRAN RYERSON. 

Price Venostran Ryerson, who for the past five years has been living retired 
in North Fairfield, was formerly actively and successfully identified with the 
agricultural interests of Huron county, owning a farm in Peru township. His 
birth occurred in this county on the 6th of November, 1851, his parents being 
George M. and Sarah Catherine (Edsall) Ryerson. The paternal grandfather, 
Peter Ryerson, had a family of eleven children, namely : Paul, Nicholas, John, 



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94 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Martin, Dolly, Jane, Libby, Eliza, Sarah, William and George M. The maternal 
grandparents of our subject were David and Hannah (Perry) Edsall, the latter 
being an aunt of O. H. Perry, of Lake Erie fame. Their family numbered nine 
children, as follows: Joseph, Benjamin, John, Brice, William, Thomas, Margaret, 
Hannah and Sarah Catherine. George M. Ryerson, the father of Price V. Ryer- 
son, who was born on the boundary line between New Jersey and New York about 
1824, passed away in the year 1902. The birth of his wife occurred in Vernon, 
New Jersey, in 1830. Unto this worthy couple were born the following children: 
Price V., Edsall Farber, George E., Deleno P., Sarah, Esther, Dora, Catherine 
and Grace. 

Throughout his active business career Price V. Ryerson was engaged in gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits in Peru township and, though he has now been living 
retired for five years, still owns his farm there. The success which attended his 
labors as an agriculturist, was entirely the result of his untiring industry and cap- 
able mangement, and he has long been numbered among the substantial, enter- 
prising and respected citizens of his native county. As stated above, he now 
makes his home In North Fairfield. 

On the 1st of January, 1879, Mr. Ryerson was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary Hinkley, whose birth occurred in Bronson township, Huron county, on the 
16th of June, 1857, ner parents being William S. and Lucy (Snyder) Hinkley. 
Her paternal grandparents, Benjamin and Maria (Paine) Hinkley, were both 
natives of Tompkins county, New York, born in the years 1809 and 181 1 respect- 
ively. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Ryerson were John and Harriett 
(Watros) Snyder, both of whom were natives of the Empire state, the former 
Dorn in 1804 and the latter in 1818. Their children were eight in number, as fol- 
lows: Henry, Vincent, Sylvester, John, Maria, Lucy, Caroline and one who died 
in infancy. The great grandparents of Mrs. Ryerson on the maternal side were 
Peter and Hannah (Wells) Snyder, the former being a native of Holland. Will- 
iam S. Hinkley, the father of Mrs. Ryerson, was born near Syracuse, New York, 
on the 17th of October, 1832, while the birth of his wife occurred near Catskill, 
Greene county, New York, on the 26th of April, 1837. Unto Price V. and Mary 
(Hinkley) Ryerson has been born one child, Roxy, whose natal day was January 
23, 1898. 

Mr. Ryerson is now serving as trustee and treasurer in the Methodist church, 
of which he is a most consistent and faithful member. Having spent their entire 
lives in this county, both he and his wife are widely and favorably known within 
its borders, their many excellent traits of character having gained them the warm 
regard and esteem of all with whom they have been associated. 



WILLIAM H. DARLING. 

No history of Huron county would be complete without special mention of 
William H. Darling, who for a long period has been closely identified with the 
public interests of this, his native county. Born in Hartland township on the 25th 
of April, 1867, he is a son of John B. and Mary E. (Noble) Darling, the former a 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 95 

native of Northumberland county, England. He came alone to the United States 
when twenty-seven years of age and settled in New York, where he followed the 
machinist's trade which he had learned in his native country. Later he went to Sus- 
quehanna, Pennsylvania, where he engaged as foreman or master mechanic in 
the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad shops, while the year i860 wit- 
nessed his arrival in Ohio, locating in Norwalk, where for a time he was employed 
in the railroad shops. Subsequently, he was compelled to give up this line of ac- 
tivity on account of failing health, and he purchased a farm in Hartland town- 
ship, where he resided until his death, which occurred in August, 1903. His 
widow and three children still survive him, the children being: Jennie, now the 
wife of F. H. Rumsey of North Fairfield ; Sate B., a teacher in the Shelbyville, 
Illinois, schools ; and William H., of this review. One daughter, Annie, passed 
away when five years of age. 

Spending the years of his boyhood and youth on his father's farm, William 
H. Darling attended the district schools in the acquirement of his early education 
and later supplemented this training by a course at the Western Reserve Nor- 
mal School at Milan, while he also pursued a course at the Northwestern Univer- 
sity at Ada, Ohio. Thus well equipped, he took up the occupation of teaching and 
for several years was engaged in that capacity in the schools of Huron county, 
proving a most capable instructor who imparted readily and clearly to others the 
knowledge he had acquired. Giving up that profession, he took a course of study 
in the Euclid Avenue Commercial College, at Cleveland, with the idea of entering 
the business world. The failure of his father's health, however, caused his re- 
turn to the home farm, where he decided to remain and take charge of his father's 
interests. He has since continued to make the old homestead his place of resi- 
dence and has directed his efforts to the further cultivation and improvement of 
the place, his activity along general agricultural lines meeting with most grati- 
fying and substantial success. 

On the 25th of January, 1904, Mr. Darling was united in marriage to Miss 
Jane Chaffee, a daughter of George W. and Anna (Phillip) Chaffee, of Hartland 
township, where both parents were born and have always resided. The home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Darling has been blessed with one daughter, Dorothy B., who 
is the life and light of the household. Fraternally Mr. Darling is connected with 
East Townsend Lodge, No 322, F. & A. M., and also with Olena Tent, No. 58, 
K. O. T. M., in the affairs of which he is deeply and helpfully interested. 

Although Mr. Darling has become well known throughout the locality by rea- 
son of the success that he has achieved in his business activities, it is, however, the 
active part which he has taken in the public affairs of Huron county that has brought 
him prominently before his fellow citizens and has made him one of the valued 
representatives of the community. Republican in politics, he has always done all 
in his power to further the influence of that party in the district and has been a 
prominent and influential figure in the party councils. For several years, he 
served as county central committeeman and is constantly being sent as a dele- 
gate to the district, county and state conventions. His fellow citizens, recogniz- 
ing his ability and worth, have frequently called him to office, and for a number 
of years he served as township clerk and also clerk of the board of education for 
the township, which positions he still holds. He is also acting as justice of the 



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96 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

peace and was census enumerater for Hartland township in 1890. In 1908, he was 
the candidate on the republican ticket for county recorder, but with the rest of the 
ticket was defeated. He had been nominated by acclamation, a very rare occur- 
rence in Huron county politics. He is now serving as notary public and carries 
on considerable business in that connection. A man of splendid attainments, he 
performed the duties of each office in such a capable and satisfactory manner, that 
his efforts reflected honor not only upon himself but also upon his constituents. 
Progressive in his citizenship, he is an advocate of advancement and improvement 
in all forms, but he is especially zealous in the matter of good roads and advanced 
schools, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart champion. His various 
interests have made his a well rounded nature and he stands today as a splendid 
type of the high-minded American gentleman, with whom contact means expan- 
sion and elevation. Huron county is proud to number him among her native sons. 



GEORGE W. SHERMAN. 

George W. Sherman owns and operates a good farm of sixty-one acres of 
land in Lyme township, and his business qualifications and his genuine personal 
worth entitle him to mention with the representative citizens of Huron county. 
A native of this township, he was born a half mile south of Hunts Corners on 
the 22d of April, 1861, a son of Samuel and Mary Ann (Carpenter) Sherman, 
old settlers of this district. The parents were natives of England, the father's 
birth occurring March 9, 1838, while the mother's natal day was March 20, 
1843. Samuel Sherman was but fourteen years of age when he left England with 
his father, William H. Sherman, and his brother, Joseph, and came to Ohio, 
locating in this county. The father, however, did not remain in this country, but 
returned to England, leaving his son Samuel with Alonzo Husted, to whom he 
was bound out as a farm hand to work until twenty-one years of age, when he 
was to receive one hundred dollars and two suits of clothes. He worked so 
diligently and faithfully, however, that at the age of twenty years Mr. Husted 
released him and offered him the money and clothing. He accepted the latter 
but left the money with his former employer on interest. He then worked for 
Luther Avery for eleven dollars per month, until, by earnest toil and careful 
expenditure, he had saved another one hundred dollars. He then drew his original 
one hundred dollars from Mr. Husted, with the interest which had accumulated 
in the meantime, and embarked in business on his own account, renting a farm 
of Mr. Husted on shares. About this time he married Miss Mary Ann Car- 
penter and afterward purchased thirty acres of land which now forms a part of 
the farm owned by his son George W. As the years came and went he was suc- 
cessful in his undertaking and by judicious investments extended his possessions 
until his home farm consisted of sixty-one acres and he had accumulated other 
property throughout the county, his holdings today amounting to three hun- 
dred acres of land, aside from the tract now owned by the subject of this review. 
He is a prominent member of the Episcopal church, regulating his life at all 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 99 

times by its teachings. He now resides, at the age of seventy-one years, in 
Monroeville, Ohio, but his wife passed away December 25, 1908. 

George W. Sherman came to his present home when four years of age and 
has since lived in this county, spending his boyhood days in the acquirement of 
an education as a pupil of the district schools. When not busy with his text-books 
he devoted his time to the tasks that usually fall to the lot of the farm lad and 
at an early period became familiar with the work of the fields, assisting more fully 
as his age and strength permitted, so that he was well equipped to take up the 
work on his own account when, after attaining his majority, he secured the 
farm upon which he now resides. It consists of sixty-one acres. It is a finely 
improved property that yields abundant harvests in return for the care and labor 
expended upon it. He is a progressive, up-to-date farmer, capably managing 
his business interests, and the success which he has attained ranks him among 
the representative agriculturists of his township. 

Mr. Sherman was married on the 26th of January, 1887,* to Miss Florence 
Sarah Fry, a native of England and a daughter of David and Martha (Button) 
Fry, also natives of that country, the former born in 1847 and the latter in 
1848. Leaving their native land at an early date, they became early settlers 
in this county, where they still make their home. Mrs. Sherman is the eldest of 
a family of six children, the family remaining unbroken by the hand of death. 
The others are Byron W., Daisy S., Roland G., Elizabeth M. and Alice. As 
the years have come and gone the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sherman has been blessed 
with six children, namely, David H., Mildred P., Frank T., Clements G., Blanche 
G., and Joseph B., all of whom are still under the parental roof. 

Mr. Sherman holds membership in the Lyme Trinity church, while his fra- 
ternal relations are with the Woodmen of the World, Camp No. 40. He also is 
a member of the Protective Horse Association of Lyme township. He is a mem- 
ber of the school board and has served thereon for several terms. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, but he does not seek public office as a 
reward for party fealty, preferring to devote his entire time and attention to his 
personal affairs. He is, however, public spirited, taking a helpful interest in all 
matters pertaining to the material, intellectual and moral welfare of the com- 
munity, while his personal traits of character have gained him the esteem and 
good will of his fellowmen. 



WAKEMAN O. MAYNARD. 

Wakeman O. Maynard* of Greenwich township, was born September 21, 1849, 
in Peru, Huron county, his parents being John G. and Angeline (Osborne) 
Maynard. Both the Maynard and Osborne families were originally from Tomp- 
kins county, New York, and came to Huron county when John G. and Angeline 
were young people, the latter becoming a teacher in the county schools and follow- 
ing that occupation until marriage. They were farming people, and became promi- 
nent and influential in their chosen occupation. 



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100 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

The family of John G. Maynard consisted of five children: Charlotte A., Wake- 
man O., John T., Oman A. and Louis, two of whom, Charlotte A. and Louis, are 
deceased and lie buried in the Edwards Grove cemetery in Ripley township. Here 
also the mother was laid to rest in the summer of 1885, and the father in the fall of 
1887. 

Wakeman O. Maynard had no educational privileges or opportunities outside of 
the district schools of Ripley township, except one term in a select school in Green- 
wich. He grew to manhood on the home farm, assisting in the usual work and 
manifold cares of the business, unconsciously adding to a meager school educa- 
tion the experience and handicraft of manual labor. 

On September 6, 1886, Mr. Maynard married Miss Almeda Burge, one of the 
successful and popular teachers of the county, who was a daughter of Benjamin 
and Catherine Burge. Her death occurred in 1895, and left a vacant place in the 
wide circle in which she moved, for, during the years she taught, she made many 
true friends who held her in high esteem. On September 21, 1897, occurred the 
second marriage of Mr. Maynard, his wife being Miss Isabella Lowrie, a daughter 
of David and Agnes (Smith) Lowrie, of Cleveland, Ohio. Before her marriage 
Mrs. Maynard was a teacher of ability and a great favorite of patrons and pupils. 
To meet her is to meet a cultivated and superior mind, an intelligent and hospitable 
woman, and to know her is to know a friend and companion. 

Mr. Maynard has lived on the farm where he now resides since 1886. It is lo- 
cated one mile northeast of the village of Greenwich, and consists of one hundred 
and thirty-two acres of well improved land under a high state of cultivation — a 
farm to be proud of. 

A republican in politics, he takes active interest in all public affairs. As a mem- 
ber of the township board of trustees, he has served six years and has shown him- 
self a capable and thorough officer, while his service to the cause of education has 
been through his membership in the township school board. As a promoter of all 
public improvements, Mr. Maynard stands well to the front in his township. Yet 
with the cares of a farm of one hundred and thirty-two acres and his public service, 
he still finds time to engage in his favorite recreation of hunting and fishing, enjoy- 
ing them most thoroughly. Both Mr. and Mrs. Maynard are members and active 
workers in the Methodist church. But their home tells us best, perhaps, of the per- 
sonality of the occupants — genuinely hospitable, cheerful, pleasant and refined, all 
blended by that harmonizing influence denominated Christianity. 



THEODORE D. SHEPHERD. 

Theodore D. Shepherd became widely and prominently known throughout the 
city of Norwalk as the efficient postmaster during almost two terms, and thus his 
death, which occurred on November 21, 1904, was the occasion of deep and wide- 
spread regret. He was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, October 13, 1843, and in 
June, 1869, was united in marriage to Miss Ella S. Newman, who was born in Nor- 
walk township, October 23, 1844. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 101 

After reaching manhood and fitting himself for the responsible duties of a 
business career, Mr. Shepherd engaged in bookkeeping and the accounting busi- 
ness, following that profession for several years. He was later appointed post- 
master of Norwalk and gave such efficient and capable service during his first term 
that he was reappointed but his death occurred prior to the expiration of his second 
term. In this connection he became well known because of his courteous treatment 
of the patrons of the office and his capability in discharging his official duties. 

His political allegiance was given to the republican party, to which he gave 
stanch support. A highly respected citizen, his death caused deep regret not only 
to the members of his own immediate household, but also among his many friends 
and acquaintances. 

As above stated, Mrs. Shepherd was born in Huron county, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles E. Newman. Mr. Newman was engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness throughout his active business career, handling dry goods, books, stationery, 
etc. He was a communicant of the Episcopal church, to which he gave loyal sup- 
port, while for thirty-five years he acted as superintendent of the Sunday school. 
His death occurred when he was sixty-seven years of age, and thus passed away 
one of the highly respected and well known citizens of Norwalk, for he had taken a 
deep interest in many public movements, having served throughout a long period as 
a member of the board of education. He was also active in the establishment of 
the Children's Home at this place and did all in his power toward the advancement 
and promotion of all worthy measures, giving freely of his time and means. His 
political support was given to the republican party. 

Mrs. Shepherd spent her girlhood under the parental roof and acquired her 
education in the schools of her native city. It was in June, 1869, that she gave 
her hand in marriage to Theodore D. Shepherd, and she became the mother of a 
son and daughter ; Charles V., who was born June 15, 1871 ; and Cornie May, who 
was born December 6, 1872, and on the 15th of November, 1894, gave her hand in 
marriage to I. W. Goodell. Mrs. Shepherd takes great pride in the fact that she is 
a Daughter of the Revolution, while her religious faith is indicated by her member- 
ship in the Episcopal church. Having spent her entire life in the city of Norwalk, 
she has a large circle of friends, who esteem her for her many excellent traits of 
character and for the hearty welcome which they receive in her hospitable home. 



ANDREW JACKSON BLACKMAN. 

Andrew Jackson Blackman, the proprietor of Melrose Farm and one of the 
most prominent and influential men of Clarksfield township, was born December 10, 
1830, in New London township, Huron county, the son of Simeon and Wealthy 
(Barret) Blackman. Both parents were natives of New York, but the father 
came to this state in 1815, with his brother Joel, his family following later. On 
the journey, he and his brother learned when they reached Buffalo that peace had 
been declared ending the war of 1812 and that the city of Buffalo itself was to a 
large extent wrecked by fire, incurred through the war. Continuing their journey 
they came direct to Florence township, Huron county, and the next year Simeon lo- 



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102 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

cated in New London township, where he bought one hundred and ten acres of 
land, all timber, but with a log cabin upon it put up by the previous owner. Mr. 
Blackman immediately set to work to clear the land and to put up a more sub- 
stantial and permanent habitation. He also set out an orchard. The Barrett fam- 
ily subsequently became residents of Ohio, and the daughter, on one of her visits 
to her relatives here, met Mr. Blackman and was married to him on the 21st of 
April, 1821. In the course of the many years of hardships that followed she proved 
a most indispensable helpmeet. Mr. Blackman was a man who won success in all 
of his undertakings, and in addition to his farming engaged in the manufacture of 
potash, becoming a large producer of this substance and in the production of pearl 
ash also. New London township was his home until 1833, when he removed to 
Russia township, Lorain county, living there for two years. He removed to a 
farm in the vicinity of Huron village, but the country there was new and unhealth- 
ful, and seemed to offer but few chances of advancement, and after two years Mr. 
Blackman removed to Vermilion township, Erie county, where he bought a farm. 
After two years he traded this, in .1839, to Isaac Van Houton, for the farm in 
Clarksfield township that was his home until his death, which occurred May 7, 
1864. His wife survived him more than a quarter of a century and when death 
called her, December 15, 1891, she was buried by her husband in Butterfield ceme- 
tery, New London township. The couple were blessed with a family of eight chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. Those who grew to maturity were Orinda, 
Elvira A., Wealthy A., Andrew J., Mary A. £nd George W. 

Andrew J. Blackman is the only member of this family now living in Huron 
county. He grew up on his father's farm, which was his home until his twenty- 
first year. His education was derived from the district schools of the county, sup- 
plemented by a term at Oberlin College. All his life he has been devoted to farm- 
ing and two years after his marriage, in 1857, he purchased a small farm, which 
has since been incorporated in his present acres. On this he has prosecuted a gen- 
eral line of farming and has also engaged in stock raising and feeding. In both 
of these pursuits he has been very successful. He owns at present something over 
two hundred and sixty acres and at one time owned considerably more. He is also 
a man who has given a great deal of time to the service of the people and has been 
singularly active in political affairs. For a long period he filled the offices of town- 
ship trustee, of justice of the peace and road supervisor, and it is only recently that 
he has not held office of some kind. He cast his first vote for Zachary Taylor in 
1852 and was later a consistent republican until recent years, when he has inclined 
somewhat to independence in politics. He has always kept well informed on poli- 
tical issues and is able to discuss questions intelligently. He investigates for him- 
self and, as the right appears to him, so directs his course. For a number of years 
he was a most active member of the Grange, but lately he has not been able to give 
it so much time. 

On the 1st of September, 1855, Mr. Blackman was united in marriage to Miss 
Emeline Smith, a daughter of Sherman and Caroline (Knapp) Smith, of Huron 
county. Her step-father, Simeon Hoyt, Mrs. Smith's second husband came from 
Connecticut to Huron county in 1817 as a surveyor assisting his brother, Com- 
fort Hoyt, of the Firelands, and with him was the first settler in Clarksfield town- 
ship, where he became very prominent as years passed on. Two children were 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 103 

born to Mr. and Mrs. Blackman, Sherman F. and Emma Dell. The latter mar- 
ried Charles H. Burrows, a prosperous farmer of this township. The son has lost 
his wife and now lives with his father at the old homestead. Mrs. Blackman died 
June 14, 1909, and is buried in the Methodist Episcopal cemetery of Clarksfield 
township. 

Mr. Blackman has never been a church member, but good morals have ever 
distinguished his career and the years of his life have borne witness to strong prin- 
ciples and have had a noble influence upon the community in whose midst he lived. 
The Blackman home is perhaps the most pretentious in Clarksfield township, is a 
large brick building that in appointments and conveniences compares well with the 
best homes anywhere. A large library discriminatingly supplied with the best cur- 
rent and standard literature, is the pride of its owner. It is a home in the truest 
sense of the word and most gracious hospitality is ever extended to the many, 
friends who visit there. 



JAMES HENRY HAKES. 

James Henry Hakes, the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and eleven acres 
in Bronson and Fairfield townships, has recently put aside the active work of the 
fields and is now living retired in North Fairfield. His birth occurred in Bronson . 
township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 1st of December, 1844, his parents being 
Norman S. and Adlia M. (Fox) Hakes, both of whom were natives of New York. 
In 1840 they made their way to this county, taking up their abode in Bronson town- 
ship. They reared a family of five children, namely: James Henry, of this review ; 
Norman William ; Samuel Albert ; Mrs. Annette Mycrantz ; and Mrs. Martha L. 
Kellogg, a resident of Chicago, Illinois. 

James Henry Hakes acquired his education in the common schools of his home 
neighborhood and remained under the parental roof until four years after his mar- 
riage. He then took up his abode on a farm of one hundred and eleven acres in 
Bronson and Fairfield townships, which is still in his possession and to the cultiva- 
tion and improvement of which he devoted his attention until 1909 In his farming 
operations he followed practical and progressive methods and annually gathered 
rich harvests which found a ready sale on the market. He likewise has a credit- 
able military record, having enlisted as a soldier of the Union army in Septem- 
ber, 1863, as a member of Company C, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He was mustered out on the 9th of September, 1864, an d dur- 
ing his entire term of service did garrison duty in Virginia, guarding the fortifica- 
tions between Washington and Alexandria. He now makes his home in North 
Fairfield and is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community as a 
most substantial and representative citizen. 

In 1868 Mr. Hakes was united in marriage to Miss Isabelle Holmes, a daughter 
of William and Isabelle Holmes, of Fairfield township. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes had 
a family of seven children, as follows: Richard, Jane, Catherine, Mary, William, 
Isabelle and James. Mrs. Isabelle Hakes passed away on the 28th of May, 1889, 
leaving two children, Harry H. and Loftus N. For his second wife Mr. Hakes 



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104 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

chose Mrs. Ellen M. (Muir) White, to whom he was joined in wedlock in June, 
1898. 

Mr. Hakes holds membership relations with the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He has a very wide and favorable acquaintance throughout the county in which 
his entire life has been spent, his upright character and sterling worth having 
gained him an enviable place in the regard of many friends. 



WILLIAM BARBER. 



William Barber, who for many years has been successfully identified with 
general agricultural and stock-raising interests in Wakeman township, was born 
in Wiltshire, England, on the 16th of January, 1828, his parents being Edward 
and Jane Barber. In the year 1850 they crossed tha Atlantic to the United 
States, coming direct to Wakeman township, Huron county, Ohio, where they 
joined their son William, who had made the voyage to the new world in 1848. 
Edward Barber, the father of our subject, was a cabinet-maker by trade but after 
coming to this country turned his attention to farming. Unto him and his 
wife were born six children, namely : Mary Ann, Sarah, Matilda, Elizabeth, Wil- 
liam and Edward. All are now deceased with the exception of William, whose 
name initiates this review. 

William Barber obtained his education in the parish schools of his native land 
and early in life learned the cabinet-maker's trade, working at that occupation 
in England until he set sail for the United States in 1848. After landing in 
this country he first went to Summit county, Ohio, where he remained for a 
year, being employed at his trade. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Wakeman township, this county, and bought twenty acres of timber land, 
which he eventually developed into a good farming property. He has given his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits almost exclusively throughout his 
entire business career, though for a few years he also worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade to some extent. As time passed by and his financial resources in- 
creased he added to his holdings by additional purchase until at one time he 
owned two hundred acres of rich and arable land, having cleared the timber 
from one hundred acres. He cut down and burned enough good timber to have 
made a fortune at present prices. In addition to cultivating the various cereals 
best adapted to soil and climate he has also been engaged in the raising of stock, 
both branches of his business returning to him a gratifying annual income. The 
neat and thrifty appearance of his farm bespeaks his industry and systematic 
methods. His crops are of the best, his stock is comfortably housed and in 
fact everything about the place indicates the supervision of a practical and 
progressive owner. 

On the 6th of May, 1853, Mr. Barber was united in marriage to Miss Hannah 
E. Stiles, a daughter of Henry and Sarah Stiles, of Clarksfield township. The 
Stiles family were among the early settlers of Huron county and took a prom- 
inent part in community affairs. Mr. and Mrs. Barber are the parents of eight 
children, as follows : Anna E. ; Frank M., a resident of Chicago ; Ella, the wife 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 107 

of Charles Peck, of Viola, Illinois ; Edward, living in Delaware ; Jane, at home ; 
Henry, who follows farming in Wakeman township ; Ida, also at home ; and Wil- 
liam C, who makes his home at Lorain, Ohio. On the 6th of May, 1909, Mr. 
and Mrs. Barber celebrated their fifty-sixth wedding anniversary, on which 
happy occasion all of their children, as well as a large number of friends and 
acquaintances, were with them. 

Politically Mr. Barber has always given his allegiance to the republican 
party, casting his first presidential vote for Fremont in 1856. Though not active 
in politics as an office seeker, he has always kept well informed on the ques- 
tions and issues of the day and served in the position of township trustee and 
also as a school director for many years. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Congregational church, with which his wife and children 
are also identified. He has always been active in church and Sunday-school 
work and was instrumental in organizing a Sunday school in the local school- 
house of which he was superintendent for many years. He is public-spirited to 
a marked degree and well merits the esteem and respect which are uniformly 
accorded him, being a high-minded gentleman of the old school whose entire 
life has been characterized by industry and integrity. He has endeavored to 
exemplify the teaching of the Golden Rule in his daily life and his influence 
is always found on the side of right and progress. The worthy poor find in him 
a sympathetic and helpful friend. He has now passed the eighty-first milestone 
on life's journey and for sixty years of this time has been a resident of Huron 
county, within the borders of which he is most widely and favorably known. 
Coming to the new world in early manhood, he has felt that the country fully 
justified his expectations and in this land, where labor is unhampered by caste 
or class, he steadily advanced and as a result of his persistent energy and una- 
bating industry gained a place among the substantial and representative citizens 
of his community. 



J. ANDREW M1SSLER. 



J. Andrew Missler is the owner of one hundred and thirty-three acres of rich 
and productive land in Sherman township, eighty acres of which is comprised in 
one tract and the remaining fifty-three acres in another. He has been a resident of 
Sherman township from his birth to the present time, his natal day being February 
11, 1872. His parents, Andrew and Caroline (Meyers) Missler, were natives of 
Germany but became acquainted in the United States and were married in this 
country. It was in 1854 that the paternal grandfather, Francis Missler, brought 
his wife and children to the new world, the family home being established in Hu- 
ron county, Ohio, where he continued to reside until called to his final rest on the 
19th of March, 1871. The demise of his wife occurred six weeks later. Unto 
Andrew and Caroline (Meyers) Missler were born the following children: J. An- 
drew, of this review; Catherine; Mary; Joseph; John; Jacob, deceased; Fred; 
Otto ; and Clara, who has passed away. 



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108 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

J. Andrew Missler attended school in Sherman township until he had attained 
the age of fifteen years and then gave his entire attention to the work of the hom£ 
farm, assisting his father in its cultivation until twenty-eight years of age. He 
then bought eighty acres of land from his father and subsequently purchased an- 
other tract of fifty-three acres from him, so that his holdings now embrace one hun- 
dred and thirty-three acres, to the cultivation and improvement of which he devotes 
his time and energies with excellent results. He annually garners good crops and 
has gained favorable recognition as one of the representatives and progressive 
agriculturists of his native county. 

On the 7th of June, 1898, Mr. Missler was united in marriage to Miss Caroline 
Diehm, a daughter of Phillip and Barbara Diehm, of Sherman township. The 
father, who followed farming throughout his active business career, is now de- 
ceased. His children were seven in number, namely : Mary, John, Barbara, Frank, 
Elizabeth, Caroline and Anna. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Missler have been born five 
children : Lenus, Clem, Celia, Romie and Phillip Peter. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Missler has cast his 
ballot in support of the men and measures of the democracy. He and his wife 
are communicants of the Catholic church and are people of the highest respecta- 
bility, enjoying in almost unqualified measure the high esteem and kindly consid- 
eration of all with whom they have come in contact. 



JOHN PARROTT. 



Industry, honesty, frugality — the three golden keys which unlock the door to 
success — used by John Parrott, of Ripley township, he finds himself hale and 
hearty at the age of eighty-eight years, with broad, rich acres and with the good- 
will and respect of a host of friends. He is of English birth, born April 7, 1821, 
and the son of William and Hannah (Lee) Parrott, of Somersetshire. His parents 
with their nine children, came to Ripley township, July 28, 1841, and opened up a 
farm. The mother passed away six years later in September, 1847, an d the father 
in January, 1856. The children in order of birth were: Mary, John, Charlotte, 
Frederick, William, Hannah, Angeline, Eliza and George. Of these, John, Char- 
lotte, Hannah and Eliza still survive. 

John Parrott, now one of the wealthiest landowners of Greenwich, said that he 
landed in Huron county with "one cent in my pocket, with which I bought a 
cracker." So with the cracker in his stomach and a large and enthusiastic faith in 
his heart, he went out and conquered the dragon of adversity. Hiring to a farmer 
for eight dollars per month, he began the battle of life. He married at the age 
of twenty-six, and in 1850 left home and friends to seek fortune in the California 
gold fields. The overland journey of six months, with all its attendant thrilling ex- 
periences, brought him to the scene of action. But, like many others, the steady 
employment at large wages appealed to him more than the uncertainty of mining. 
For a year he drove a three-yoke team of oxen at two hundred dollars per month. 
Then family and civilization drew him back to the Buckeye state, returning by the 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 109 

isthmus route to find more gold in the soil of Greenwich township than he ever saw 
in California. 

The secret of Mr. Parrott's success is "work persistently and consistently per- 
formed." Saving a little at eight dollars per month, a little more at two hundred 
dollars, but always a portion of what he earned and investing as opportunity of- 
fered. That is the story. The six hundred broad acres of rich Ripley soil came to 
Mr. Parrott through that channel. General farming and stock raising have been 
his life-time occupations. 

Voting the democratic ticket consistently each recurring election day, and at- 
tending and liberally supporting the Presbyterian church, to which his family be- 
longs, has constituted the extent of his political and religious life. He is a citizen 
whose influence gives strength to the community, because of the fine example of 
his life. 

John Parrott was married June 18, 1847, to Miss Jane Harkness, whose mother 
had the distinction of being the first white woman settling in Fairfield township. 
She was the daughter of Amos and Martha (Samples) Harkness, who came to 
Fairfield township from Pennsylvania, in 1816. The mother died in February, 
i860, and the father in July, 1869. To Mr. and Mrs. Parrott were born: Char- 
lotte A. ; James P., now deceased ; William H., also deceased ; and Frank, a farmer 
of Huron county. 



JAMES F. MAYNE, M. D. 

Dr. James F. Mayne, who has been successfully engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in Olena since 1897, was born in Pennsylvania, April 21, i860, a son of John 
and Susan (Heggee) Mayrie, the former born in the Keystone state in 1829, while 
the birth of the latter occurred February 22, 1831. John Mayne engaged in farm- 
ing as a life work and took a very active interest in politics. He was called by his 
fellow citizens to fill a number of township offices. He was a republican in poli- 
tics. His death occurred in September, 1901, but he is still survived by his wife, 
who has reached the advanced age of seventy-eight. 

James F. Mayne, born on the home farm near New Castle, in Lawrence county, 
Pennsylvania, was reared to agricultural pursuits. He acquired his education in 
the State Normal at Edinboro, and after completing his studies, engaged in teach- 
ing for seven years. In the meantime, having decided upon the practice of medi- 
cine as a life work and having saved a sum of money sufficient to prepare himself 
for this end, he then entered the medical department of the University of Woos- 
ter, Ohio, where he was a student for two terms. He spent a year in Pittsburg, 
in the meantime, graduating from the medical department of the University of 
Wooster July 24, 1889. Having thus carefully prepared for the practice of medi- 
cine he located in Edinburg, Pennsylvania, where he remained one year, and from 
that place he went to Lottsville, that state, where he practiced seven years. Be- 
lieving, however, that Olena offered a better field for his labors, he came to this 
place in 1897, and in the intervening years has built up an extensive practice, which 
extends over a radius of several miles, his services being in demand in many of the 



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110 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

best homes in this district. He keeps two horses and an automobile to make his 
trips ancfis thus able to answer all calls promptly. 

On the nth of September, 1896, Dr. Mayne was united in marriage to Miss 
L. Adelaide Wynn, who was born in New York state, May 18, 1865, a daughter 
of J. I. Wynn, of Limestone, New York. Their marriage has been blessed with an 
interesting little daughter, Helen Marie, who was born March 4, 1899. The Doc- 
tor holds membership in the Huron County Medical Society and thus keeps in 
touch with the advance made by the profession. He is also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Presbyterian church. A republican in 
politics, he finds little opportunity to devote to public measures as his time is fully 
occupied with the demands of his practice. He is highly esteemed in Olena and 
vicinity, not only as a professional man but also as a citizen and friend of humanity 
who lives for the good he can do to his fellowman. 



FRED SEEL. 



Fred Seel is a prosperous and energetic agriculturist, residing on and owning 
a farm of one hundred and forty-six acres in Lyme township, while he also has an- 
other tract of one hundred and eighty-eight acres in the vicinity, lying partly in 
Sherman township. His birth occurred in Germany on the 1st of October, 1855, 
his parents being John P. and Dorothy (Gap) Seel, whom he accompanied on their 
emigration to the new world about 1870. Coming direct to this county, they took 
up their abode in Lyme township with their son William, who had crossed the At- 
lantic about a year before. Both Mr. and Mrs. Seel continued worthy and re- 
spected residents of this community until called to their final rest, passing away at 
the ages of seventy and ninety years respectively. Their family numbered seven 
children, namely : William ; Henrietta ; Philipena and Philip, all of whom are de- 
ceased ; Pauline ; Peter, and Fred, of this review. 

The last named has made his home in Lyme township since his arrival in the 
United States when a lad of fourteen years. His education had been begun in his 
native land and he further continued his studies in the schools of Lyme township 
through two winter terms. On putting aside his text-books he gave his undivided 
attention to the work of general farming and has been successfully connected with 
that line of activity throughout his entire business career. In 1892 he purchased 
the farm whereon he now resides from Asa Haywood and as the years have gone 
by has brought the property under a high state of cultivation and improvement. 
He erected a commodious and attractive residence and the labor he has bestowed 
upon his place has made it a wel! improved and valuable farm, which in its neat 
and thrifty appearance indicates his careful supervision. He has led an active, use- 
ful and honorable life and now owns three hundred and thirty-four acres of val- 
uable land in Huron county as the result of his business ability and judicious 
investments. 

On the 29th of February, 1888, Mr. Seel was united in marriage to Miss Dora 
M. Bolenbacher, who was born in Sherman township, Huron county, December 13, 
1857, a daughter of John P. Bolenbacher, of Lyme township. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 111 

Seel have been born three children: Rosa, Edna and Philip, all at home. Mr. Seel 
is a prominent and valued member of the Lutheran church of Lyme township, for 
the erection of which he contributed liberally and in which he has served as trustee, 
while for fifteen years he has been secretary. In the community where they re- 
side both he and his wife are much esteemed as people of genuine worth, manifest- 
ing those sterling traits of character which in every land and clime awaken con- 
fidence and regard. 



JOHN A. STRUTTON. 



John A. Strutton, closely identified with the banking business in Norwalk since 
1889, i s now secretary of the Home Savings & Loan Association. In a logical 
course of events he has risen to his present position of responsibility, his succes- 
sive promotions having followed as the direct result of persistent energy and ac- 
tivity and thoroughness in fully acquainting himself with the field of labor which 
he cho$e as his life work. A native son of Norwalk, he was born September 19, 
1866. 

His father, Louis de Hayes Strutton, was born in London, England, January 
16, 1821, and came to the United States in 1849, settling at Milan, Ohio. He was 
first employed on the Toledo, Norwalk & Cleveland Railroad and as an expert ac- 
countant opened their books. In 1850 he came to Norwalk and studied law, being 
admitted to the bar in 1855. He then continuously engaged in practice up to the 
time of his death which occurred in April, 1901. He held various offices pertaining 
to the city's welfare and progress, being for some time a member of the city coun- 
cil and also of the school board. His political allegiance was given to the democ- 
racy and few men of the laity were better qualified to speak authoritatively upon the 
political problems of the day. He regarded the profession of law, however, as his 
chief life work and his devotion to his clients' interests was proverbial. He gave 
to those whom he represented in a legal capacity the services of great talent, un- 
wearied industry and comprehensive learning but he never forgot there were cer- 
tain things due to the court, to his own self respect and above all to justice and a 
righteous administration of the law which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the 
pleasure of success would permit him to disregard. He wedded Eliza Wiles, who 
was born in Ramsgate, England, in which country they were married in 1846. 
Their family numbered eight children, four sons and four daughters including 
William Strutton, who now resides in Bellevue, Ohio ; Sarah, now Mrs. Taber ; 
and Miss Lucy Strutton, who is librarian of the public library at Norwalk. These 
three together with our subject are the representatives of the family in Huron 
county. 

John A. Strutton acquired his early education in the public schools of Norwalk 
and received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Kenyon College. Having studied 
law he was admitted to the bar in 1889 but has never practiced. He has always 
given his attention to banking interests, with which he became identified in 1889 as 
teller in the First National Bank, thus continuing for twelve years. He then 
helped to organize the City Banking Company and became its assistant cashier while 



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112 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

at the same time he was treasurer of the Home Savings & Loan Company. On the 
death of O. W. Williams, secretary of the latter institution, Mr. Strutton was 
elected secretary and has continued to serve in that capacity to the present time. 
He has bent his energies to the careful and correct solution of financial problems 
and in the management of affairs of the Home Savings & Loan Association, which 
come in his department, he has contributed in substantial measure to the success 
of the enterprise. 

On the 15th of June, 1897, Mr. Strutton was united in marriage to Miss Caro- 
line Wooster Boalt, a daughter of Captain Frederick H. Boalt, a native of Huron 
county, who was a veteran of the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Strutton lost one child 
in infancy and they have two children living, Charlotte Frederica, born October 16, 
1906, and Louis de Hayes, born July 29, 1909. The parents hold membership in 
St. Paul's Episcopal church, of which he is a vestryman and treasurer. He is also 
one of the trustees and members of Whittlesy Academy, of which his father was a 
charter member. He is also the treasurer of the Young Men's Reading Room As- 
sociation and belongs to the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. In all mat- 
ters relative to the public welfare he stands in the foremost rank of those who 
seek improvement and progress for he has carefully studied the purposes and prob- 
lems of life and realizes that above all money considerations is that of character 
building and of doing for others. 



THOMAS CONE. 



Thomas Cone, who is the oldest resident of Monroeville, has long been num- 
bered among the most prominent citizens of this county. His birth occurred 
in Trumbull county, Ohio, on the 10th of February, 1819, his parents being Les- 
ter and Stella A. Cone. In the year 1830 they came to Ridgefield township, 
Huron county, locating on the farm which has since remained the home of our 
subject. The father was greatly interested in race horses and owned a number 
of fine specimens of the noble steed, while his son later owned the famous Joe 
Hoker. In 1835 he was shot and killed at Sandusky, Ohio, by Bob Hutchinson, 
of Kentucky, during an argument about the money which the latter owed Mr. 
Cone. 

Throughout his active business career Thomas Cone has given his time and 
energies to general agricultural pursuits, meeting with a gratifying and well 
deserved measure of prosperity in that line of activity. He has a highly im- 
proved and valuable farm of two hundred and thirty-two acres in Ridgefield 
township, lying partly in Monroeville, and the substantial and commodious brick 
residence thereon was erected by him in 1866. He also made the brick used in 
its construction. Like his father, he has always been interested in race horses 
and is widely recognized as one of the leading and representative citizens of 
Huron county. 

Mr. Cone has been married twice. In 1842 he wedded Miss Henrietta Smith, 
who passed away in 1857? leaving two children, Lester and Charles E. Lester, 
who served as a soldier of the Union army during the Civil war, died at the 



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THOMAS OONE 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 115 

Soldiers' Home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Charles E. is married and makes 
his home at Orange, New Jersey. On the 13th of October, 1858, Thomas Cone 
was again married, his second union being with Miss Mary Hathaway, whose 
demise occurred on the 15th of April, 1908. Unto them were born two children, 
namely : Thomas H., who is deceased ; and Henrietta, a resident of Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

In his political views Mr. Cone has always been a strong and inflexible re- 
publican and for two terms capably served his fellow townsmen in the position 
of assessor. Though not affiliated with any church, he has always endeavored 
to do unto others as he would have them do unto him and has been a worthy 
exemplar of the Golden Rule. He is most widely and favorably known through- 
out the community where he has now made his home for almost eight decades 
and receives the respect and veneration which should always be accorded one 
who has traveled thus far on life's journey and whose career has ever been up- 
right and honorable. 



ALBERT SAMUEL PRENTISS. 

Albert Samuel Prentiss enjoys the well earned distinction of being what the 
public calls a self-made man. With limited opportunities in youth, thrown upon his 
own resources from an early age, he has made continuous progress and upon the 
foundation of physical and mental activity has built his success. He was born in 
Monroeville, Ohio, April 2, 1861, and is a representative of one of the old pioneer 
families of this part of the state. His grandfather, Jonathan Prentiss, arrived in 
this county when the work of civilization and progress seemed scarcely begun and 
established his home in Lyme township, where he followed the occupation of farm- 
ing for a long period but eventually retired from active life. He died in Monroe- 
ville at a very advanced age. His son, Samuel Prentiss, was a native of this county 
and died in 1861. His wife bore the maiden name of Lois J. Brown and was a 
daughter of Albert Brown, one of the old pioneers of Monroeville. He was born 
May 6, 1801, came to this county about 1820 and for more than the Psalmist's 
allotted span of three score years and ten continued his residence here, passing away 
on the 27th of May, 1894. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Emma Jane 
Bloomer, was born May 18, 1808, and died October 9, 1888. She was a representa- 
tive of one of the families that took up the work of development and improvement 
here in pioneer times. 

Albert S. Prentiss, an only child, is indebted to the schools of Monroeville for 
his early educational privileges. His father died before the birth of the son and at 
an early age the boy faced the necessity of providing for his own support, but it is 
a well known fact that it is under the stimulus of need and in the face of opposition 
that the best and strongest in men are brought out and developed, and Albert S. 
Prentiss soon became self-reliant as well as self-supporting, and learned many 
lessons of value concerning life, its possibilities and its purposes. He first turned 
his attention to the printing business in Monroeville and after learning the trade 
removed to Norwalk in 1879 and became connected with the Norwalk Chronicle, 



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116 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

which he represented in various capacities for five years. In 1885 he became asso- 
ciated with Mr. Laning in the printing business and for many years has been treas- 
urer of the Laning Printing Company, thus being well known as a representative 
of the business life of Norwalk. 

Mr. Prentiss has always taken an active part in public affairs, realizing the ob- 
ligations and duties as well as the privileges of citizenship. To this end he has 
stood for good government, for substantial progress and practical reform. For 
two terms, or four years, he was a member of the city council. He was also a mem- 
ber of the board of water works for two terms and while acting as a member of 
the board was made a member of the building committee, having charge of the 
construction of the new water works of Norwalk. He was also a member of the 
board of public service for three years and for ten years has been secretary of the 
public library. His labors have been far-reaching in their scope and influence and 
in the position of leadership he has don., not a little to promote the best interests of 
the city. 

On the 14th of October, 1884, Mr. Prentiss was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
D. Gilson who died in 1890. Later he wedded Florence N. Ruggles, a daughter 
of A. J. and Theckla A. (Lewis) Ruggles, who were of an old pioneer family of the 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss have one daughter, Corinne Florence, born in 
Norwalk, September 28, 1898. He and his family occupy a handsome new resi- 
dence on West Main street. 

His fraternal relations are with the Masons and in the craft he has attained the 
Knight Templar degree. He also belongs to the Royal Arcanum and the National 
Union and is a member of the Episcopal church. He is likewise a member of the 
Whittlesy Academy, and a director of the Firelands Historical Society while his 
political allegiance is stanchly given to the republican party. What he has accom- 
plished represents the wise use of time, talents and opportunities and indicates the 
chances which are open to the young man in this country where usefulness con- 
stitutes the path to public honor and prominence. 



ABEL C. MILLER. 



Abel C. Miller, one of the well known, industrious and enterprising farmers of 
Hartland township who is meeting with success in his agricultural pursuits, has also 
figured prominently in the public affairs of the community in which he has resided 
for a number of years, and his efforts have been potent elements in the progress 
and improvement of the township. One of Ohio's native sons, he was born in Jef- 
ferson township, Knox county, on the 21st of September, 1840, his parents being 
Hiram and Priscilla (Clark) Miller, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter of Ohio. Representatives of the Miller family have been identified with the 
interests of the state from early pioneer days, the grandfather of our subject, Jona- 
than Miller, who was born in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia, having come to 
Knox county, Ohio, in 18 12. The Clarks also came from the Keystone state, and 
both families were very active in the early work of improvement and transforma- 
tion carried on in the pioneer days of Ohio, coming in 1818 They were adherents 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 117 

of the Quaker belief and were citizens of the highest type. Hiram Miller, the 
father of our subject, acquired a good education in spite of the limited opportunities 
then offered and was considered a fine grammarian and mathematician. He taught 
school for some years in Knox county and later became a landowner, also engaging 
to some extent in farming. He was a stalwart republican, deeply interested in 
all matters of public moment, and passed away in 1856, at the age of forty-five 
years, after casting his vote for John C. Fremont. 

Abel C. Miller, who was reared upon his father's farm, attended the district 
schools in the acquirement of his education, and when not engaged with his text- 
books he assisted his father in the work of the fields, early learning lessons of great 
value in the school of experience. 

After completing his studies he engaged in teaching for several years, being 
thus occupied during the winter months, while during the summer seasons he car- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits. An interruption in his business came, how- 
ever, in the spring of 1864, when he enlisted as a member of Company F, One 
Hundred and Forty-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and for one hun- 
dred days he served with the Army of the Potomac, experiencing all of the hard- 
ships and privation which that army, under General Grant, was compelled to en- 
dure. When mustered out he returned home with an excellent military record. 

After his return home Mr. Miller again took up his former occupations of 
teaching and farming and was thus engaged until his marriage, which occurred 
on the 19th of November, 1869, the lady of his choice being Miss Martha J. Norick, 
a daughter of Hezekiah and Mary (Sell) Norick. Mrs. Miller was one of eleven 
children born unto her parents, who originally came from Pennsylvania and, ar- 
riving in Harrison county, Ohio, at a very early date, were numbered among the 
pioneers of this state. Subsequently they removed to Knox county and still later 
to Richland county, where both passed away. After his marriage Mr. Miller re- 
moved to Richland county, where he resided for four years, and in 1874 he came to 
Hartland township, Huron county, purchasing the farm upon which he has since 
lived. He carries on general agricultural pursuits and is progressive and up-to- 
date in his methods, and his untiring industry and well directed energy have proven 
the salient characteristics in the prosperity which he now enjoys. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Miller has been blessed with six children, five of 
whom still survive, namely : William E., who is married and resides in Massillon ; 
Hiram C, who is also married and follows farming in Townsend township ; Mary, 
the wife of Charles Robbins, of Hartland township ; Emma F., who wedded Fred- 
erick Bedford and resides in Townsend township ; and Harriet, still under the pa- 
rental roof. 

Although he has gained a creditable degree of success in his business activities, 
it is as a prominent figure in public affairs that Mr. Miller has become well known 
throughout the community. In politics a life-long republican, he has been active 
and influential in the local party ranks and for many years he was a member of the 
township republican executive committee, serving at various times as a delegate to 
district and county conventions. He has also been called to offices of trust and re- 
sponsibility, the duties of which he performed at all times in a manner which re- 
flected honor upon himself and credit upon his constituents. In the fall of 1900 
he was elected county commissioner of Huron county and served six years, being 



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118 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

reelected in 1903. He served as justice of the peace of Hartland township for fif- 
teen years and was also township trustee and member of the board of education for 
many years. He is a splendid type of the true American citizen whose influence 
is always upon the side of progress, reform and improvement, and he has ever done 
all in his power to bring about better conditions. While a member of the board of 
county commissioners he was very active and helpful in the matter of road build- 
ing and accomplished a great amount of good along this line. 

He is a member of Townsend Pest, No. 414, G. A. R., and is an active factor 
in its affairs. Although he does not hold membership in any special denomination, 
he is, nevertheless, a firm believer in the church and its influence for good in the 
community, and he never withholds his support from any matter which has for its 
object the material, political, intellectual and moral development and growth. 



WILLIAM BARNES. 



William Barnes is numbered among the enterprising and progressive farmers 
of Townsend township, where he owns a fine tract of land of seventy acres. He 
was born near London, England, November 24, 1848, a son of George and Sararj 
(Eath) Barnes, who emigrated with their family to the United States in 1852 and 
established their home in Cleveland, Ohio. There the father sought employment, 
working at anything that would bring to him an honest living for himself and 
family. Prior to coming to the new world he had engaged in farming on a small 
scale. On leaving Cleveland he removed to Camden, where he spent two years and 
on the expiration of that period he located on a farm in Clarksfield township, where 
he remained two years. He then took up his abode upon a farm in Wakeman town- 
ship and continued agricultural pursuits there until his demise in July, 1895. Unto 
him and his wife were born eight children, seven sons and one daughter : William, 
Charles, Thomas, King A., Elizabeth, Edward, George and Frederick, and these 
with the mother still survive. 

William Barnes, the eldest of the family, did not enjoy very liberal educational 
advantages, as, the family being in somewhat straitened circumstances, his ser- 
vices were needed on the home farm, so that he was permitted to attend school only 
a few weeks during the winter months and it was not until he had reached the age. 
of eighteen years that he attended the Wakeman school for a full year. Since 
reaching mature years, however, he has added to his knowledge by reading and in- 
vestigation. During the summer months he assisted in the labor of the home farm, 
doing a man's work in the fields at an age when most boys are acquiring their edu- 
cation or enjoying the pleasures of life. In the winter months he worked in the 
woods, preparing the fuel to supply the household needs and comforts. 

Mr. Barnes eventually started out in life on his own account and from his earn- 
ings saved the money that enabled him to purchase his present tract of seventy 
acres, located in Townsend township. He established a home of his own by his 
marriage on the 26th of February, 1876, to Miss Emily Westfall and on the 9th 
of March following they began their domestic life in the house that Mr. Barnes 
had prepared for his bride. He then began work in earnest and has continued to 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 119- 

follow farming to the present time, his place being now one of the rich and highly 
cultivated properties of his section of Huron county. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Barnes has been blessed with five children : Anna 
R.; Cora, now the wife of William Sheffield, of Toledo, Ohio; Mary, Walter R, 
who is married and makes his home in Wakeman township ; and William C, who is 
also married and resides in Townsend township. Fully realizing his own lack of 
advantages he resolved that his children should receive an education suited to the 
demands of the time, that they might start out in life well equipped for the eager, 
strenuous service of this exacting age, and therefore all have graduated from either 
the Collins or Wakeman high schools, while subsequently the daughters were given 
the advantages of Oberlin College. 

Mr. Barnes is a republican in politics and is well informed on all public ques- 
tions. Although he has frequently been urged by his fellow townsmen to accept 
public office he would never consent to do so, with the exception of filling the po- 
sition of road supervisor. He has also been a member of the township school 
board for several years and takes a deep and active interest in the schools, that his 
own and other children might be benefited. He and his family are members of the 
Wakeman Congregational church, Mr. Barnes having joined the society forty years 
ago. He has always been active in church and Sunday school work. Public spir- 
ited in an eminent degree, he favors all legitimate public movements and is num- 
bered among the enterprising and substantial farmers of Townsend township and 
Huron county. 



JOSEPH MISSLER. 



Joseph Missler is an enterprising and progressive farmer of Sherman town- 
ship, owning and operating ninety acres of land. He is numbered among the wor- 
thy native sons of this county, his birth having occurred in Sherman township on 
the 20th of August, 1876. His parents, Andrew and Caroline (Meyers) Missler, 
were both born in Germany. The father was but a small boy when he accompanied 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Missler, on their emigration to the United 
States in 1854, the family home being first established in Adams county, Ohio. At 
the end of a year, however, they took up their abode in Huron county, where the 
family has since been represented. Francis Missler, the grandfather of our subject, 
was called to his final rest on the 19th of March, 1871, and six weeks later his wife 
also passed away. Unto Andrew and Caroline (Meyers) Missler were born the 
following children : J. Andrew ; Catherine ; Mary ; Joseph, of this review ; John ; 
Jacob, deceased ; Fred ; Otto ; and Clara, who is deceased. 

In his youthful days Joseph Missler attended the schools of his native town- 
ship and on putting aside his text-books, at the age of seventeen years, turned his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits, working by the month as a farm hand. 
The work of the fields has always claimed his time and energies and in this line 
of activity he has met with well deserved and commendable success, being now the 
owner of a rich and productive tract of land of ninety acres in Sherman township. 

On the 7th of June, 1904, Mr. Missler was united in marriage to Miss Nora 
Miller, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Seisley) Miller, who were farming peo- 



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120 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

pic of Seneca county, Ohio. The father was a native of Germany but the mother 
was born in this country. Mrs. Missler was one of a family of eleven children, 
her brothers and sisters being as follows : Rosa, George, Mary, Charles, Caroline, 
Fred, Anna, Joseph, Ottilia and Otto. 

Mr. Missler gives his political support to the democratic party and while he 
keeps well informed on the political progress of the country, he has never been ac- 
tive as an office seeker, preferring to give his undivided time and attention to his 
private interests. Both he and his wife are consistent and devoted members of 
the Catholic church. He has always made his home in this county and his upright 
and honorable life commands the respect of a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 



WILLIAM CLEMENTS. 

The agricultural interests of Huron county find a worthy and successful 
representative in William Clements, who is the owner of a valuable farm of 
one hundred and thirty-four acres in Ridgefield township. His birth occurred 
in Bathford, Somersetshire, England, on the 9th of August, 1854, his parents 
being Henry and Mary Clements, who spent their entire lives in that country. 

On the 5th of January, 1878, while still residing in his native land, Mr. 
Qements was united in marriage to Miss Martha Hughes, a daughter of John 
and Anna (Shore) Hughes, of Wiltshire, England, by whom he had four chil- 
dren. Ada L., the eldest, who was born November 26, 1878, was drowned on 
the 29th of July, 1898, while boat riding at Cedar Point in company with Howard 
Fish and another young couple. The boat was overturned and she and Mr. 
Fish lost their lives, the other two young people being saved. George, whose 
birth occurred September, 20, 1880, and who makes his home in Ridgefield town- 
ship, wedded Miss Ethel Daunter, by whom he, has one child, Ada L. Rose, 
whose natal day was March 8, 1882, gave her hand in marriage to Harry An- 
drews and they reside in Groton township, Erie county. They now have two chil- 
dren, Ada M. and Everett W. William J., born August 15, 1884, makes his home 
in Monroeville. He wedded Miss Emma Dirilbliss and has two children, Eunice 
M. and William. 

In March, 1889, Mr. Clements crossed the Atlantic to the United States with 
his wife and four children, the family home being established in Ridgefield town- 
ship, Huron county. Securing employment as a farm hand, he was thus busily 
engaged for four years, and then engaged in farming on shares until 1905, when 
he purchased his present farm of one hundred and thirty-four acres from Mrs. 
Anna M. Stentz. As the years have gone by he has made many substantial im- 
provements on the property and in the conduct of his farming interests has met 
with a most gratifying measure of prosperity by reason of his untiring industry, 
indefatigable energy and excellent management. 

Mr. Clement is a trustee of the Baptist church, of which the other members 
of his familv are likewise devoted and faithful members. He is also identified with 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 123 

the Foresters and the Protective Legion, acting as chaplain of those organiza- 
tions. He is well known throughout the community as one of its substantial 
citizens and progressive farmers who owes his advancement in life entirely to his 
own perseverance and well directed labor, and is well worthy the regard which 
is uniformly accorded him. 



CHARLES HEYMAN. 



The agricultural interests of Huron county find a worthy and successful repre-* 
sentative in Charles Heyman, who owns a well improved farm of one hundred and 
seventy-two acres in Peru township. He was born in Sherman township, this 
county, on the 16th of November, 1858, a son of William A. and Janetta (Moore) 
Heyman, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father, whose birth oc- 
curred in August, 1830, was a young man of eighteen years when he crossed the 
Atlantic to the United States, taking up his abode in Huron county, Ohio. His 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad W. Heyman, who emigrated to this country two 
years later, established their home at Hunts Corners, whil^ subsequently they re- 
moved to Weavers Corners, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 

On arriving in this county William A. Heyman, the father of our subject, 
worked as a farm hand for different agriculturists of the community but> carefully 
saving his earnings, was at length enabled to purchase one hundred acres of land 
in Sherman township and began farming on his own account. As the years passed 
by and his financial resources increased he added to his landed holdings by addi- 
tional purchase, buying a tract of two hundred and fifty acres in Sherman town- 
ship and another of one hundred and twelve acres in Lyme township. He became 
widely recognized as a most substantial, progressive and representative citizen of 
the county and at one time owned about six hundred acres of rich and productive 
land. His political allegiance was given to the men and measures of the democracy 
and he acted as justice of peace in Sherman township for more than twenty years, 
did valuable service as a member of the school board and also proved a capable in- 
cumbent in other positions of public trust. He assisted in the erection of the Ger- 
man Reformed church at Hunts Corners and the Lutheran church at Pontiac, in 
both of which he held membership and also served in an official capacity. His 
demise, which occurred on the 12th of May, 1903, was the occasion of deep and 
widespread regret, for he had won an extensive circle of friends by reason of his 
honor, integrity and uprightness in every relation of life. 

His first wife, who bore the maiden name of Janetta Moore, was about eight- 
een years of age when she accompanied her parents on their emigration to the new 
world, the family home being established in Sherman township, Huron county. 
She was called to her final rest in 1873, when forty-three years of age. By her 
marriage she had become the mother of fifteen children, as follows : Mary, who is 
now the wife of William Boehler ; Emma, who wedded Henry Bishop, of Nebraska ; 
Louisa, who is deceased ; Charles, of this review ; Sarah and David, who have like- 
wise passed away ; Adam, a resident of Michigan ; Isaac and Henry, who make 
their home in Lyme township ; William ; Jacob, likewise living in Lyme township ; 
Clara, who is the wife of H. Hacker and resides in Michigan ; Ben, of Kansas ; and 



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124 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Henry and Isaac, who are deceased. Subsequent to the death of hs first wife Wil- 
liam A. Heyman was again married, his second union being with a Mrs. Weirmas- 
ter, a widow, by whom he had two children : Hugo, who has passed away ; and 
Otto, a resident of Bellevue. 

With the exception of ten months spent at Tiffin, Seneca county, Ohio, Charles 
Heyman has always resided in Huron county. He obtained his education in the 
district schools of Sherman township, where he made his home until twenty-three 
years of age, when he took up his abode in Lyme township, there remaining for two 
years. On the expiration of that period he came to Peru township and has here 
since resided. He owns a valuable and finely improved farm of one hundred and 
seventy-two acres and in the conduct of his agricultural interests has met with a 
measure of prosperity that entitles him to recognition among the successful and 
progressive citizens of his native county. 

On the 9th of March, 1882, Mr. Heyman was joined in wedlock to Miss Louisa 
Boehler, a native of Peru township and a daughter of Philip and Margaret (Seibel) 
Boehler, of that township. By this union there are two children: Gotthold W., 
whose birth occurred April 13, 1883 ; and Anna L., now the wife of J. C. Linder, 
of Peru township. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Heyman has given his 
political allegiance to the democratic party and is now serving as township* school 
director. He acted as constable of his township for two years and was also elected 
justice of the peace but declined the honor. He is an officer in the German Luth- 
eran church at Pontiac, in the work of which he is most actively and helpfully inter- 
ested. No trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree and 
his fidelity to honorable, manly principles has won for him the good will and friend- 
ship of those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



SAMUEL L. HARVEY. 



Samuel L. Harvey, the well known proprietor of the Fairfield Plow Works, was 
born in Fairfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 26th of January, 1852, his 
parents being John and Susanna (Ash) Harvey, both of whom were natives of 
Leicestershire, England. They crossed the Atlantic to the United States about 
1846 and came direct to Fairfield township, this county, locating on a farm which 
the father purchased within a year after taking up his abode thereon. On that 
place he successfully and energetically carried on his agricultural interests until the 
time of his retirement from active business life. Unto him and his wife were born 
the following children, namely : Frances, the widow of Merrett Tuttle ; Mrs. Diana 
St. Johns ; Richard, who was killed by a tree falling upon him ; David, who wedded 
Miss Anna McCrary ; Samuel L., of this review; and John LeGrande, who married 
Miss Fanny Johnson, of Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

Samuel L. Harvey obtained a good practical education in the common schools 
and remained under the parental roof until the time of his marriage. He then took 
up his abode on his father's farm, where he continued to reside until 1881, when he 
came to North Fairfield and worked at painting and carpentering for about two 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 125 

years. In 1884 he became engaged in the boot and shoe business, with which he 
was connected until 1887, when he formed a partnership with Homer Lamoureaux 
and Olen O. Olney for the manufacture of plows, the enterprise being known as the 
Fairfield Plow Works. At the end of a few months, however, Mr. Olney and Mr. 
Harvey purchased the interest of Mr. Lamoureaux and the concern was then con- 
ducted under the name of Olney & Harvey until 1893. In that year Mr. Harvey 
bought the interest of his partner and has since remained as the sole owner of the 
business, which is now known as the Fairfield Plow Works. The concern manu- 
factures both steel and chilled plows and Mr. Harvey has gradually built up the 
trade until it is now one of large proportions, shipments being made throughout 
Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania and other states. The factory turns out 
what is known as the Fairfield Burch plow, of which Nicholas Burch, a resident of 
North Fairfield was the patentee. On February 24, 1906, the entire plant was de- 
stroyed by fire but it was immediately replaced by a new one on the same site. Mr. 
Harvey himself sells most of the output, spending about six months of each year on 
the road. He possesses in a remarkable degree the qualities desirable in the execu- 
tive officer of a large manufacturing business — energy, industry, tact, a retentive 
memory, quick assimilation and mastery of details and a wide knowledge of the 
needs of the trade. 

On the 23d of April, 1874, Mr. Harvey was united in marriage to Miss Cinde 
L. Godden, a daughter of William and Lucinda (Butler) Godden, of Fairfield 
township, Huron county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Godden reared a family of eight 
children, as follows : Harriett, Elizabeth, Mary, Jennie, Sarah, Cinde, Emory and 
John. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Harvey have been born two sons. Fay Hendrickson, 
whose birth occurred June 22, 1875, wedded Miss Edith Baumgardner, a daughter 
of Israel and Mary Baumgardner, of Ridgefield township. They now have two 
children, Vera Fay and Barbara. Fay H. Harvey is in the employ of his father. 
Charles Durward, the younger son, who was born on the 2d of July, 1877, is en- 
gaged in the undertaking business. He married Miss Laura Bishop, a daughter 
of David A. and Sarah Elizabeth Bishop, by whom he has one child, Elizabeth 
Shirley. 

Mr. Harvey is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Christian church, 
associations which are a clear indication of the principles which govern his life and 
guide his conduct in his relations with his fellowmen. He is now serving as one of 
the elders in the church. In the county where his entire life has been spent he has 
an extensive and favorable acquaintance and is widely recognized as a prominent 
and successful representative of its manufacturing interests. 



FRED H. SMITH. 



Fred H. Smith is at the head of The Smith Monumental Works, one of the 
largest establishments of its kind in the country, the business being located in 
Norwalk, the annual sales amounting to between thirty and sixty thousand dol- 
lars. Mr. Smith is a native son of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Sandusky, 
Erie county, February 27, i860. He acquired his education in the public schools 



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126 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

of his native city and when a youth of fifteen years, began learning the marble 
cutter's trade, being bound out by his father for a term of three years. His term 
of indenture being completed, in 1878, when eighteen years of age, he learned 
that A. T. Davis, then conducting a marble shop in Norwalk was in need of help 
and Mr. Smith accordingly applied for the position, which he secured, receiving 
as compensation a dollar and a half per day. He continued with Mr. Davis a 
year and a half, his wages being advanced to two dollars and a half per day. 
Severing his connection with that firm, he then engaged with R. R. King, with 
whom he worked at intervals for two years, while later he entered the employ 
of the Lake Shore Railroad Company, cutting stone for their bridge work and 
receiving a salary of three dollars per day. Still later, he was employed for a 
time by the Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad Company, doing marble cutting 
for bridge piers and receiving a good salary for the same. 

In December, 1883, having saved a small amount of money from his earnings, 
Mr. Smith formed a partnership with W. V. McKnight, a former fellow work- 
man, and on the 1st of January, 1884, they began operations in the marble busi- 
ness. Their joint capital amounted to but two hundred dollars but they were 
young men of determination and energy and during the ten years in which they 
did business together, they built up a large and lucrative trade. After a decade 
Mr. McKnight died and Mr. Smith purchased his interest in the business from 
the heirs and continued in the same line, the firm name, however, being changed 
from McKnight & Smith to The Smith Monumental Works, which continues 
to the present time. The business was first located at the corner of Seminary 
street and Linwood avenue. During this period the business had grown to 
such proportions that it became necessary to seek larger quarters. Accordingly, 
in June, 1900, Mr. Smith purchased the builders' supply business at the corner of 
Prospect and Monroe streets, which was formerly used as a supply yard by the 
Norwalk Brick and Stone Company. On this ground he erected a plant, thirty- 
six feet wide, one hundred and eighty feet deep and twenty feet high. Here he is 
now conducting business and in addition to monumental work, also handles all 
kinds of builders' supplies, with the exception of hardware and lumber. He 
has secured a large patronage in all branches of his business and especially in 
the monumental trade, specimens of his work being found in the various ceme- 
teries over a radius of thirty miles. He employs twenty skilled workmen, and 
being himself well versed in the monumental business in its various phases, he 
is thus able to give the utmost satisfaction to his patrons. Perhaps the most 
notable work which he has done is to be found in the Milan cemetery — the Fries 
Mausoleum, which was erected for the late Valentine Fries, one of Ohio's great- 
est shipbuilders, at a cost of seventeen thousand, five hundred dollars, it being one 
of the most expensive individual mausoleums to be found in all northern Ohio. The 
annual sales now amount to between thirty and sixty thousand dollars and are 
still increasing. Mr. Smith has connected with him in business his two step-sons, 
James J. and Harry G. McKnight, both bright young men, who will undoubtedly 
become experts in their particular line. Both are graduates of a business college. 

Mr. Smith was married in 1895, the lady of his choice being Mrs. Katharine 
(McKnight) Burger, who was born in Norwalk, April 17, 1863. Her father, 
Joseph Burger, was bom in Peru township, Huron county, in 1832. When young, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 127 

he learned the carpenter's trade and has spent his entire life in this city, being one 
of the worthy pioneer citizens of this section of the state. 

Mr. Smith is a republican in his political views, while in religious faith, he is a 
Congregationalism He is an Odd Fellow, belonging to both the subordinate lodge 
and the encampment. He may truly be called a self-made man, for, starting out 
with comparatively nothing, he has through the inherent force of his nature and 
the utilization of opportunities, passed from the unknown into prominence, ad- 
vancing from a humble place in the business world to a position of distinction as 
head of The Smith Monumental Works, an establishment of wide reputation 
throughout northern Ohio. 



SAMUEL C SHERMAN. 

George Washington said that "agriculture is the most useful as well as the most 
honorable occupation of man;" and it is to this line of activity that Samuel C. 
Sherman devotes his time and energies, owning a well improved and productive 
farm of ninety-eight acres in Lyme township. His birth occurred in that town- 
ship on the 5th of March, 1865, his parents being Samuel and Mary Ann (Car- 
penter) Sherman, both of whom were natives of England and became early set- 
tlers of Huron county, Ohio. The former, whose natal day was March 9, 1838, 
was a lad of fourteen years when he accompanied his father, William H. Sher- 
man, and his brother, Joseph Sherman, on their emigration to the new world, a 
settlement being made in this county. Subsequently William H. Sherman re- 
turned to England, leaving his son Samuel with Alonzo Husted to whom he was 
bound out. It was agreed that the lad should work for Mr. Husted until he had 
attained the age of twenty-one years, when he would receive one hundred dollars 
and two suits of clothes. He proved so faithful, energetic and industrious that 
Mr. Husted gave him the money and clothing a year before his apprenticeship 
had expired. Leaving the money with Mr. Husted, who agreed to pay interest 
thereon, Mr. Sherman went to work for Luther Avery at a wage of eleven dol- 
lars per month. He remained in that employ until, by close economy, he had 
saved another hundred dollars and then Mr. Husted gave him the money which 
he had earned during his term of indenture, together with the interest that had 
accrued thereon. Mr. Sherman was at this time about twenty-three years of age 
and started out as an agriculturist on his own account, renting a tract of land on 
shares from Mr. Husted. He also made further preparations for establishing 
a home of his own by his marriage to Miss Mary Ann Carpenter, who was born 
in England on the 20th of March, 1843. When his well directed labor and careful 
expenditure had brought him sufficient capital, Mr. Sherman purchased thirty 
acres of land in Lyme township and afterward extended the boundaries of the 
place by additional purchase until it comprised sixty-one acres, which farm is now 
in possession of his son, George W., whose sketch appears on another page of this 
volume. As the years went by and his financial resources increased, Mr. Sherman 
gradually added to his holdings until he is now the owner of three hundred acres 
of rich, productive and arable land in (his county and is widely recognized as 



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128 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

a most substantial, enterprising and respected citizen. Beginning with absolutely 
nothing but his own willing hands and indomitable courage, he has made his way 
to success and prosperity and well merits the confidence and esteem which are 
uniformly accorded him. He now makes his home in Monroeville and is a valued 
member of the Episcopal church, in which he has served as deacon. His wife was 
called to her final rest on the 25th of December, 1908. 

Samuel C. Sherman was reared to agricultural pursuits and acquired his 
education in the district schools. He has always made his home in Lyme town- 
ship and has followed farming throughout his active business career, purchasing 
his present place of ninety-eight acres in 1895. For six years prior, however, 
he had operated the farm as a renter and has made many improvements on the 
property, remodeling the dwelling, erecting barns, etc. In fact, the place is 
lacking in none of the accessories and equipments of a model farm of the twen- 
tieth century and the fields annually yield golden harvests in return for the care 
and labor that is bestowed upon them. 

In November, 1887, Mr. Sherman was joined in wedlock to Miss Carolina 
Peadon, a native of Lyme township and a daughter of George and Anna Peadon, 
who were born in New Jersey and became residents of Lyme township, this 
county. By this union, there are seven children, namely: Bertha M. ; Henry G. ; 
Mabel Ann ; Charles C, who is deceased ; Carl L. ; Samuel L. ; and Laura E. The 
surviving children are all at home. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, Mr. Sherman has cast 
his ballot in support of the men and measures of the republican party and has 
served as road supervisor for several terms. Like the other members of his 
family, he is affiliated with the Episcopal church of Lyme township, of which 
he is acting as deacon and sexton and in the work of which he is deeply and help- 
fully interested. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sherman have always resided in this com- 
munity and have an extensive circle of friends who esteem them for their gen- 
uine personal worth and upright, honorable lives. 



CHARLES A. SUTTON. 

Charles A. Sutton, a wealthy farmer of Greenwich township, Huron county, 
and well known for the active and influential part he has played in this locality, 
owns three hundred and ninety-six acres of excellent land, upon which he lives. 
It was also the place of his birth, which occurred July 4, 1844, and the modern 
brick house which is his home stands not very far from the little log cabin which 
was his father and mother's first home when they came to this county still in the 
state of a wilderness. He is the son of J. Aranson and Emiline (Brady) Sutton, 
both of whom were parties to experiences in the pioneer days that rival any that are 
told of persons who have by virtue of circumstances attained to historic prom- 
inence. Aranson Sutton, who was born April 1, 1802, and two companions, his 
twin brother Alanson and James Carver, formed a trio who came from New 
York state to Ohio in 1824. They were all single men and spent the first night 
in Greenwich township, Huron county, with the family of Willis Smith, who 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 131 

then lived about one mile east of Greenwich village. The three young men first 
took up a tract of land in Ruggles township in what is now known as Ashland 
county, and began the work of clearing. Aranson, however, after a time, sold 
his interest in the land to Mr. Carver, who remained there. For a few years he 
worked at whatever there was to do, until in 1828 he bought one hundred and 
sixty acres of land and built his cabin home. About this time he married, and his 
wife who had to share the rude cabin and the few conveniences, did her share 
toward relieving the hardships of the men. Even the simplest domestic duties 
were performed with difficulty, for when Mr. Sutton and the men who helped 
him were out in the woods clearing land for the crops, his wife would be cook- 
ing their meals over a log fire in the open air. He had come to this county with 
three hundred dollars in money, a log chain, an ax, and a few other belongings, 
but he went to work with the determination to win. His acres grew to the num- 
ber of six hundred, and when an accident in the woods brought about his death, 
November 17, 1870, a train bearing down upon his wagon, which passed over his 
body, he held good securities to the value of twenty thousand dollars, besides a 
large amount of personal property. Not only had he been a man who was active 
in advancing his own private interests, but he was also deeply interested in public 
matters. For a period of twenty years he served as justice of the peace, and it 
is said that during that time almost all the marriages of this locality were solemn- 
ized by "Squire Sutton." He was an active worker in the Methodist church, 
being known as an exhorter, and he contributed liberally to all church and charit- 
able work. In his family were five children : Charity, Mary J., Sarah, Louisa 
and Charles A. Louisa, who is now Mrs. J. A. Fancher, and the son, Charles A., 
are the only members of the family now living. Mrs. Sutton died January 28, 
1873, and with her husband lies buried in Ninevah, Greenwich township. 

The son grew to young manhood on his father's farm and acquired his early 
education in the county district schools, which he supplemented by a few years at 
Berea College and at Oberlin. At the age of twenty-six he married and with his 
wife settled on the home farm, upon which they have lived ever since. It is a 
fine tract of land of three hundred and ninety-six acres, and its fields bear wit- 
ness to the thorough methods of culture prosecuted by its owner. But though 
as a farmer he is successful in the highest interpretation of the word, that is 
not his only concern in life, for he has large financial interests in the Home Sav- 
ings & Banking Company of Chicago Junction and in the First National Bank of 
Greenwich. In several other enterprises, large and small, he is interested as well. 
In politics he and his sons are stanch republicans and factors in the counsels of 
the party, frequently being members of county committees and delegates to party 
conventions. Aside from such positions, however, he has never been persuaded 
to accept any office within the gift of the people, though for a long term he did 
serve the community well as a member of the township school board. 

On the 21st of April, 1870, Mr. Sutton married Miss Ann E. Ellis, a daugh- 
ter of William B. and Esther (Rickard) Ellis. Mrs. Ellis was a native of Trum- 
bull, Ohio, but her husband came to this state from Onondaigua county, New 
York. He attained to a fair prominence among the farmers here, possessing 
four hundred acres of land at the time, he passed away, May 28, 1884. His wife 
survived a little less than four years. Mr. and Mrs. Sutton have three sons: 



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132 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Edward A., William B. and Charles D. The eldest is a cashier in the Home 
Savings & Banking Company of Chicago Junction ; the second has assumed all 
the responsibilities of the home farm ; and Charles D. is a coal dealer of Cleve- 
land, being the head of the C. D. Sutton Coal Company. 

Mr. Sutton and his sons, who appear to be following in his footsteps, are all 
Christians and give their support to churches, their influence being ever exerted 
for the good of the community. He is a man whose life may well bear inspec- 
tion, for. he is one of this county's finest citizens. 



WILLIAM HENRY TREMBLEY. 

William Henry Trembley, a retired agriculturist residing in North Fairfield, 
was born in Ripley township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 30th of December, 
1837, his parents being William and Sarah Ann (Hoffmier) Trembley, natives 
of New Jersey and New York respectively. The father spent his early life in 
Tompkins county, New York, and about 1828 came to Huron county, this state, 
taking up his abode on a farm which he had purchased in Ripley township. Sub- 
sequently he sold that property and bought a farm in Fairfield township, in the 
cultivation and improvement of which he was successfully engaged until the time 
of his demise. He was twice married and by his first wife had five children, 
namely : Jerome, Minor, Sarah Ann, David and Mary Ann. By his second wife, 
he also had five children, as follows: William Henry, Marion, Oliver, Evalina 
and Mary Ann. 

William Henry Trembley was married when a young man of about twenty- 
seven years and continued to reside on his father's farm until 1869, when he 
removed to Michigan, in which state he followed general agricultural pursuits for 
eleven years. On the expiration of that period, he returned to the old home farm 
— a rich and productive tract of land comprising one hundred and ten and a 
half acres — which he purchased in 1893. Here he energetically and successfully 
carried on his farming interests until 1909, winning prosperity as the result of his 
untiring, persistent and well directed labor. He has now put aside the active 
work of the fields and is living retired in North Fairfield, enjoying in well earned 
ease the fruits of his former toil. At the time of the Civil war, he did active 
duty as a soldier in the Union army, enlisting in August, 1862, as a* private of 
Company D, One Hundred and First Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He participated 
in the battles of Perryville, Stone River and Nolansville and was honorably dis- 
charged in March, 1863, his term of enlistment having expired. 

On the 12th of October, 1864, Mr. Trembley was united in marriage to Miss 
Harriett Bell, who was born on the 16th of March, 1843, her parents being Na- 
thaniel and Nancy Ann (Reynolds) Bell, both of whom were natives of Richland 
county, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Bell reared a family of six children, namely: Jesse 
W., William W., John W., Sarah Jane, Hannah and Harriett. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Trembley were born three children, two sons and one daughter. William 
M., the eldest, who was born in 1866 and resides in Fairfield township, wedded 
Miss Delia Miller, by whom he has three children : Ivan, Sarabelle and Leon. Jay 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 133 

W., whose birth occurred in 1871, lives on the old homestead in Fairfield township. 
He married Miss Maud Parker and they now have one son, Carl O., born in 1906. 
Eva, born in 1879, also makes her home in Fairfield township and is the wife of 
Adelbert Ewing, by whom she has two children : Alva and Charles Henry. 

Mr. Trembley belongs to the Baptist church and has served as a member of 
its finance committee. He likewise belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic 
at Norwalk and thus maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. 
Today, at the age of seventy-one years, he is in possession of a comfortable com- 
petence and pleasant home and his well spent life merits the confidence and re- 
spect of his fellowmen. 



FRANK H. RUSSELL. 



Frank H. Russell, who for the past five years has been the principal of the 
Clarksfield schools and enjoys a reputation more than state wide among the 
breeders of sheep and poultry, was born in Greenwich township, Huron county, 
May 5, 1878, and is the son of George and Louisa (Reynolds) Russell, both of 
whom were natives of this county. The father served in the Civil war as a mem- 
ber of the Twelfth Ohio Independent Battery and is still living, but the mother 
died February 16. 1893. He has always been a farmer and since 1884 has been 
a resident of Clarksfield township, though really all his life, with the exception 
of about five years, has been spent here. Three children were born to him and 
his wife : Frank H., Doren G. and Jennie L., all of whom are living. 

Frank H. Russell spent his youth on his father's farm and received his edu- 
cation in the district schools of Clarksfield township. Later he was graduated, 
in 1899, from the Fitchville high school, through which he worked his own way, 
having taught school during his senior year, keeping up with his class at the 
same time. Since graduation, he has devoted himself to teaching and for the 
past five years has been principal of the Clarksfield Hollow schools and now, in 
1909, is still filling that position. In his profession, he has been very successful, 
is a progressive teacher and popular with his patrons and pupils alike, and the 
work accomplished in the school is very gratifying to the citizens of the village. 

In addition to his interest in education, Mr. Russell takes a great interest 
in sheep, poultry and dog breeding. Of the first, he breeds American, Delaine and 
Merino, and his flocks contain some of the finest animals in the state. As the 
breeder of thoroughbreds he has made a reputation which has brought his animals 
into such demand, that he is not able to supply all the orders for them that come 
from all parts of the United States. He is an ambitious and aspiring young 
breeder and spares no care to ensure the best stock to be had. In poultry, he 
raises pure bred Single Comb Brown and White Leghorns, Rhode Island Reds, 
Barred Plymouth Rocks, White Wyandottes, and Black Minorcas. Pedigreed 
Scotch collies are his choice of dogs. He exhibits frequently throughout the 
state, where his animals have not only brought him fame, awards in large num- 
bers, but also an income of no small proportions. Since 1901, he has made his 
home in Clarksfield Hollow, and his farm, embracing sixty-five acres, borders 



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134 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

the village. It is well adapted to his breeding interests, and his barns, yards and 
kennels excite the admiration of all who are concerned with such. Agriculture as 
well receives some share of his time, so that with all his interests, he is a very 
busy man. 

On the 14th of December, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Rus- 
sell to Miss Onie Stone, the daughter of Fernando and Julia (Clarke) Stone, of 
Fitchville township. Of this union, there have been born three daughters: Ber- 
nice L., Grace J. and Ruth L. Mrs. Russell is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and is intimately identified with all church and Sunday school 
work. 

In politics, Mr. Russell is a republican, but though he is active in all public 
matters and interested in the proper administration of affairs, he has never sought 
for office. He is a man of progressive spirit along all lines, in his vocation and 
his avocation, and the home of which he is the head is one of the factors here 
for the advancement of good work and intelligent interest in affairs. 



JEROME L. MEAD. 



Jerome L. Mead, the senior partner of the well known firm of Mead & Wood- 
ward, was born on the old homestead farm just outside the corporation limits of 
the city of Norwalk, his natal day being November 7, 1850. His parents were 
Joel E. and Betsy Ann (Lewis) Mead, the former born in Putnam county, New 
York, in 181 7, while the latter's birth occurred in Huron county, Ohio, in 1820. 
The father, who was identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his 
entire business career, was called to his final rest in 1870. Of his family of seven 
children, three still survive. 

Jerome L. Mead acquired his education in the country schools and was reared 
on the home farm, the management and care of which devolved upon him when 
his father passed away in 1870, he being the eldest son of the family. Subse- 
quently, he bought the interest of the other heirs in the property and thus became 
the sole owner of the old homestead farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres, 
in the cultivation and improvement of which he was actively and successfully en- 
gaged for about twelve years. At the end of that time, he disposed of the prop- 
erty and purchased a tract of land of one hundred and seventy-five acres in Fair- 
field township, where he remained for seven years, conducting an extensive busi- 
ness as a buyer and shipper of all kinds of live stock. 

In 1896, he came to Norwalk, where he has since been engaged in the produce 
business as a member of the firm of Mead & Woodward, the junior partner being 
D. O. Woodward. They buy and ship grain, wool, hay, etc., and also deal in 
coal and seeds of all varieties, their business having amounted to more than two 
hundred thousand dollars annually for the past few years. They have three 
elevators and also own considerable real estate, which they rent. The firm en- 
joys an unassailable reputation for the honesty of its business methods, the part- 
ners being widely recognized as men of unfaltering integrity and unquestioned 
reliability. Mr. Mead is well known as one of the substantial, enterprising and 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 135 

progressive citizens and business men of his native county and the success which 
has attended his efforts is all the more creditable by reason of the fact that it is 
entirely the result of his own well directed labor, capable management and excel- 
lent executive ability. 

On the 2d of May, 1877, Mr. Mead was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda 
L. Woodward, whose birth occurred in Clyde, Ohio, on the 8th of April, 1848, 
her parents being O. P. and Clara D. Woodward. The two sons born of this 
union are as follows : Ralph W., who first opened his eyes to the light of day on 
the 27th of January, 1878; and Fred J., whose birth occurred December 15, 1880. 
Both children obtained their education in schools of Norwalk and Cleveland. 
Ralph W., the elder son, is now serving in the capacity of bookkeeper with the 
firm of Mead & Woodward. He is a graduate of Adelbert college of Cleveland, 
a member of the class of 1902, and is a fine example of the modern American 
young business man. Fred J. Mead is engaged in the manufacture of burial vaults 
at Orange, New Jersey, conducting an extensive business of that character. He 
has built up the enterprise through his own efforts and, though still a young man, 
has gained recognition among the leading and representative citizens of his com- 
munity. 

In his political views, Mr. Mead is a stanch republican and has capably served 
as the incumbent in the office of township treasurer for two terms. He is a 
devoted and consistent member of the Presbyterian church, the teachings of 
which he exemplifies in his daily life. He has a wide and favorable acquaintance 
throughout the county where he has always resided and fully merits the high 
regard which is uniformly given him. 



JOHN K. HESTER. 



John K. Hester owns and operates the old homestead farm, consisting of one 
hundred and four acres, situated in Bronson township, and here he gives his at- 
tention to raising the various grains adapted to the soil and climate. He was 
born on this farm, September 10, 1850, the third in a family of four sons, whose 
parents were Matthias and Louisa L. (Kiser) Hester, the former born in Ash- 
land county, Ohio, December 24, 1815, and the latter September 22, 1822. The 
other members of the family are Wallace W. and George M., both now deceased, 
and Jay M., who makes his home in Clyde, this state. Matthias Hester was a stone 
mason and engraver by trade and worked at the same until after his marriage. 
He then engaged in farming in Huron county, and owing to his own labors and 
the wise counsel and assistance of his wife, he became quite successful in this 
venture. She died in 1878, and thus the members of her household suffered a 
severe loss. The death of the father occurred October 18th, 1903. 

John K. Hester was reared to farm life and acquired a common school educa- 
tion. He is now the owner of the farm which his father purchased in 1848 and 
which has been in possession of the family since that time. Mr. Hester is en- 
gaged in general farming on one hundred and four acres and in addition to his 
work he also handles machinery and real estate. At the present time, he is dealing 



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136 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

in real estate in northwestern Texas and is very enthusiastic over the prospects of 
that district. 

Mr. Hester was married in 1877 to Mrs. Cecelia J. Atwater, who was born in 
Huron county in 1852, and by her former marriage had one daughter, Anna 
A., who was born July 30, 1873. She is now the wife of Edward F. Swimmer, 
by whom she has three children : Raymond H., born April 7, 1900 ; Helen Adelaide, 
born October 22* 1^03; and Cecelia I., who was born December 3, 1907. 

Mr. Hester is a republican in his political views but is not active in the work 
of the party, preferring to give his time to his farming interests, in which he is 
meeting with success. Quiet and unassuming in manner, he is devoted to the 
welfare of his wife and in the community in which he has always made his home 
is highly respected by all with whom he is associated. 



DANIEL HEYMAN. 



Daniel Heyman, one of the most prominent and enterprising citizens of Lyme 
township, where he owns and operates a finely improved farm of one hundred and 
ninety-two acres, is a man of excellent executive ability and superior judgment 
whose services have been sought in the management and control of important 
business concerns of the county. He was born in Sherman township, Huron 
county, February 26, 1859, a son of John G. W. and Elizabeth (Longscheid) Hey- 
man, both of whom were natives of Germany and became early settlers of this 
county. The former was born on January 8, 1826, and was but a young lad when 
he accompanied his father, John Heyman, on the voyage to the new world in 1848, 
the family home being established at Hunts Corners, in this county, on the site 
now occupied by the Reformed church. John G. W. Heyman continued to reside 
there until the time of his marriage, when he took up his abode in Sherman town- 
ship, there purchasing one hundred and thirty acres of land which was covered 
with timber. There was an old sawmill on the place, where he procured the 
necessary lumber to build a home and then with characteristic energy set himself 
to the task of clearing his land. Soon it was transformed into a rich and pro- 
ductive farming property and he there successfully carried on his agricultural 
interests until within a few months of his death, spending his remaining days, 
however, in the home of his son Daniel. He was one of the most prosperous and 
energetic farmers of the community and as his financial resources increased he 
gradually added to his landed holdings by additional purchase until at the time 
of his demise he was the owner of about seven hundred acres. A public-spirited 
citizen, he took a deep and helpful interest in matters pertaining to the general 
welfare and capably served his fellow townsmen in the positions of trustee and 
school director. He assisted in the organization of the Reformed church at Hunts 
Comers, contributed liberally to its support and was acting as elder when he 
passed away, November 21, 1903. His death was the occasion of deep regret to 
all who knew him and the county mourned the loss of a citizen whose labors had 
proven an important factor in its early development and upbuilding along material, 
intellectual, political and moral lines. He had long survived his wife, her demise 



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DANIEL HEYMAN 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 139 

having occurred December 2, 1887. Their family numbered ten children, namely: 
George, who is now deceased ; Amelia, who became the wife of August Scheid ; 
Daniel, of this review ; Thomas ; Jacob ; William ; Albert ; Phillip, who is deceased ; 
Mary, who is also deceased ; and Mary, the second of the name, who has passed 
away. 

Daniel Heyman obtained his education in the district schools and remained a 
resident of his native township until 1881. In the fall of the following year he 
purchased his present place of one hundred and ninety-two acres in Lyme town- 
ship from Isaac Banta and has improved the property until there is now no finer 
farm to be found in the entire community. He has an attractive and substantial 
residence, good barns and outbuildings and in addition to his home place also 
owns another tract of one hundred and seventy acres in Sherman township. Year 
by year he has labored diligently and persistently and the success which has 
crowned his efforts as an agriculturist is but the merited reward of untiring in- 
dustry, indefatigable energy and capable management. Resourceful and enter- 
prising, he has also extended his efforts into other lines of activity and is a stock- 
holder of the Farmers & Citizens Bank of Monroeville, Ohio, likewise serving as 
a member of its board of directors and finance board. He is the president of the 
Heyman Milling Company of Monroeville and one of the directors and vice-pres- 
ident of the Sherman Oil & Gas Company of this county. The latter concern was 
organized in June, 1908, with a capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars and 
has about sixty stockholders* 

On the 8th of November, 1881, Mr. Heyman was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Scheid, whose birth occurred in Erie county, March 25, 1858, her parents 
being William and Caroline Scheid, of Erie county, Ohio. Unto them have been 
born eight children : Luella, Laura, Daniel, Jr., Leli, Oliva, Merritt, Harold and 
Gladys, all at home. 

Mr. Heyman gives his political allegiance to the men and measures of the 
democracy and is now serving his third term as township trustee, while for eight- 
een years he has been a member of the school board, ever discharging his official 
duties in a prompt and capable manner. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Eagles lodge, No. 490, of Bellevue, while his religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Reformed church at Hunts Corners, of which he is acting as 
trustee. Having spent his entire life in this county, he is well and favorably 
known within its borders and has long been numbered among its most substantial, 
representative and respected citizens. 



HENRY G. WATTS. 



The name of Watts has been a familiar one in Greenwich township for a 
number of years, the head of the family at present being Henry G. Watts, of the 
Watts Elevator Company of Greenwich village. He was born August 5, i860, 
and is the eldest son of Robert and Mary Louisa (Pike) Watts, who, in March 
of 1865, settled on a farm in Ripley township, Huron county, which is still owned 
by the family, the father operating it until 1899, when he retired and moved to 



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140 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Greenwich, where he died in April, 1906. The mother still survives him. Robert 
Watts was an active, prosperous, public-spirited citizen and won the respect atttd 
esteem of all by his integrity. 

Henry G. Watts was reared on the home farm, receiving a district-school edu- 
cation, and that culture and moral strength which emanate from a well kept coun- 
try home. For some fifteen years after attaining his majority, he remained on the 
home farm and then removed with his family to Greenwich, in the spring of 1896. 
For ten years, he engaged successfully in the general mercantile business, but 
since 1906, he and his brother, Edgar S. Watts, have conducted an elevator, buying 
and selling farm products of all kinds extensively. The firm also operates an ele- 
vator at Greencamp, Marion county, where they also deal in wool, tile and build- 
ing supplies. The Watts Elevator Company is a successfully conducted business 
concern and takes rank with the best of its kind in the state. 

Mr. Watts is a married man, his union with Miss Anna G. Strimple, of Green- 
wich, having been celebrated in October, 1892. She is the daughter of George 
and Elmira (Mead) Strimple, respected and influential farmers of the township. 

The cares of a very active business life give little time for public service, yet 
Mr. Watts has many times laid aside personal interests for those of his fellow 
citizens. He is now, and has been for years, a member of the village council, in 
which capacity he has favored good roads and civic improvements of all kinds. 
He has also been a member of the township board of education for years and the 
splendid schools of the different districts attest the intelligent interest he has dis- 
played. He is also a member of the board of infirmary directors. 

In the matter of politics, Mr. Watts is a republican, and as a delegate and ad- 
viser in the frequently called meetings of his party, is a tower of strength, because 
of his clear business judgment. Socially, he is a member of the Masonic and 
Odd Fellows fraternities, Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, F. & A. M., and No. 640, 
I. O. O. F. The family attend the Methodist church, of which Mrs. Watts is a 
working member. 



FRED MULLER. 



Fred Muller, a prosperous farmer of Sherman township and the owner of 
seventy-five acres of excellent land upon which he lives, was born in Germany, 
December 19, 1862, and is the son of Christian and Christina Muller. The par- 
ents both lived and died in Germany, and their union was blessed with five chil- 
dren. Of these the three oldest died in their youth, while Christina still lives in 
Germany, and Fred, the youngest, is the subject of this sketch. 

Fred Muller came to this country in 1887 and settled first in Baltimore. After 
five months there, he came to Bellevue, Ohio, where he remained about five 
years, working on the railroad and in a grocery store. In 1892, he purchased his 
present farm from his father-in-law, Adam Sotfred, and in the seven years it has 
been his home, he has considerably improved it, increasing its value many times. 
Before coming to this country, he had completed his education in the land of his 
birth, and had served the three years in the Germany army, which is exacted of 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 141 

every native born male, but in the years that he has been a citizen of this republic 
he has exerted himself in the interests of the country of his adoption and has taken 
an active part in local affairs, at one time serving as road supervisor. 

Mr. Muller has been married twice. The bride of the first marriage was 
Miss Carolina Sot f red, who was born in August, 1857, in Thompson township, 
Seneca county, a daughter of Adam Sotfred, and died October 22, 1892. Three 
children were born of that union : Victor, Cora and Henry. When he married the 
second time, Miss Anna Linder was the lady of his choice, a native of Sherman 
township and the daughter of Lawrence Linder, who with his wife still lives in 
that township. Of this union, which was effected on the 4th of May, 1901, there 
have been five children born : Nora, Adolph, Fred, Walter and Elsie. The family 
are members of the Lutheran church on the Columbus pike and are regular in their 
attendance at its services. 

Mr. Muller is counted among the prosperous farmers of this region. Though 
German born, he has identified himself with the interests of the country of his 
adoption and in the years that he acted as a public servant proved the quality of 
his allegiance. The German Aid Society, connected with his church, is the only 
organization to which he belongs, but he is a man who has nevertheless made strong 
friends in his locality, for he is known to be of a strong and reliable character. 



JOHN D. SMITH. 



One of the prosperous farmers of Fitchville township, Huron county, Ohio, is 
John D. Smith, who was born in New London, July 2, 1866, and is the son of 
Thomas and Johanna (Van Vecten) Smith. Both parents were natives of New 
York state, the father's birthplace having been Cross Rivers, and both came as 
young people to Huron county. The Smith family settled in Norwalk, but Thomas 
Smith pursued his calling as a farmer and butcher in New London for a number 
of years. In 1876 he removed to Michigan, where he died some years ago. His 
widow has since become the wife of Preston Palmer, a prominent citizen of Fitch- 
ville township. 

In the village of Fitchville John D. Smith was reared under his uncle's care, 
receiving his education in the schools of that place. At the age of seventeen he en- 
gaged in teaching for a time, and then entered the Northwestern University at 
Ada, Ohio. After three years' study he received from this institution the degree 
of B. S. and resumed his teaching. He taught school at West Milldrove, Wood 
county, for five years. But two other schools enjoyed his services during the six- 
teen yeais he followed that profession. He was very successful, obtaining the love 
of his pupils and the approval of his school boards, who recognized him as a pro- 
gressive man and fine teacher. In 1898 he commenced farming on the land he now 
occupies, a tract of two hundred and sixty acres, which makes good returns for 
the hard work he puts into it and the advanced and scientific agriculture he carries 
on. Of recent years, he has devoted a great deal of time to the raising of sheep, 
which are of the finest, and he constantly improves his breed. 



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142 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

On the 26th of May, 1898, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss 
Belle Norris, a daughter of Omar P. and Frona (Patton) Norris. Her mother 
died when she was a small girl, but her father is a prominent farmer of Fostoria, 
Seneca county. He was a captain in the Civil war, has served several terms in the 
Ohio legislature, and is still active in the public affairs of his county. Mrs. Smith 
before her marriage taught in the schools of Wood county, where she was known 
as a progressive teacher beloved of her pupils, and she still continues to have a deep 
interest in the educational life of the community. Two children, Ralph E. and 
Pauline, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith. 

Though he has never accepted any public office, not from lack of urging, Mr. 
Smith has ever exhibited a deep interest in the affairs that concern his fellow citi- 
zens and takes part in the life of the township. He affiliates with the republican 
party and casts his influence on the side of progress, the betterment of conditions 
generally, the improvement of public buildings, the advancement of educational 
institutions and the increase of good roads. Successful in his work and a man of 
high principles, he is respected and admired in the community where he lives. 



ALEXANDER SINCLAIR. 

Alexander Sinclair, a prosperous and prominent farmer of Clarksfield town- 
ship, Huron county, was born November 25, 1837, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 
and is the son of Alexander and Agnes (Copeland) Sinclair. The family, con- 
sisting of the father and mother and nine children, one married daughter re- 
mained in the land of her birth, came to this country in June, 1852. When they 
arrived in New London, Huron county, their capital amounted to twenty dollars 
in gold and a few personal effects. They remained in that place but a short time 
when they removed to Savannah, Ashland county, going from there to Ruggles. 
In 1855, they came to Clarksfield township, Huron county, where they purchased 
a small farm, which was the home of the parents as long as they lived. The father 
followed the trade of a stone-mason and contractor up to his sixty-fourth year, 
when he took up farming, which was his occupation for the remainder of his days. 
His death occurred in the fall of 1893, and his wife preceded him to his last rest- 
ing place by but a few years. They were buried in Clarksfield cemetery. There 
were eleven children born to this couple, nine of whom came with them to this 
country and one born after their arrival. Of these Elizabeth, Jane, Isabel, Mary, 
Alexander and John are still living; Agnes, Ellen, David, William and Charles 
have died. Those living have all attained prosperity in their walks of life. 

When Alexander Sinclair was a lad in Scotland, he herded sheep for a mere 
pittance, but upon coming to America, he took up the mason's trade which he 
learned from his father. This he followed for a number of years, at length be- 
coming a contractor and winning a reputation for skilled and honest work. He 
was married at the age of thirty-one, and four years later, during which time he 
pursued his trade, took up farming one and one-quarter miles east of Clarks- 
field Hollow, but in 1884, he removed to his present farm, which he had previously 
purchased. It was an unimproved tract, containing one hundred and forty acres, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 143 

with no buildings at all, but in the years it has been in Mr. Sinclair's possession, 
it has been greatly improved. The land, which is of a fine quality, is all under 
excellent cultivation, and buildings thoroughly modern and up-to-date have been 
erected. He practices diversified farming and raises a considerable amount of 
stock, in both of which he has been more than ordinarily successful and has 
risen to a position of prominence in the community. 

On the 22d of December, 1868, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Sinclair 
and Miss Clara Gridley, the daughter of Royal and Susan (Twaddle) Gridley. 
The family were among the pioneers of this locality and were prominent in its af- 
fairs. After their marriage the young couple lived for four years with Mrs. Sin- 
clair's family at the end of which time they removed to their farm one and one- 
fourth miles east of Clarksfield. One daughter, Grace, has been born to them. 

In politics Mr. Sinclair is a republican, having cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln in i860 and every time since then having given his support to that party. 
He has shown considerable interest in public matters, and at one time served as 
township trustee and also as a member of the school board. Foreign born, he 
has proven his right to citizenship in this republic, and the record of his life and 
the annals of his public service, demonstrate that upon no one mere creditable to 
the country could the right of franchise have been conferred. 



EDGAR BURRAS. 



Edgar Burras, who has been a resident of Fairfield township throughout his 
entire life, has devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits with 
gratifying success. His birth occurred in Fairfield township, Huron county, Ohio, 
on the 7th of November, 1842, his parents being Reuben and Sally (Standish) 
Burras. The father's birth occurred in Cayuga county, New York, in 181 2, while 
the mother, a descendant of Miles Standish, was born near Plymouth Rock. The 
paternal grandfather was the first representative of the name in this country, com- 
ing from Amsterdam, Holland. In early manhood he carried on business as a 
wholesale crockery merchant, the enterprise having been turned over to him at the 
age of nineteen by his uncle at his death. The year 1828 witnessed the arrival 
of Reuben Burras in Fairfield township, this county, where he continued to make 
his home until called to his final rest. A few years after locating here he pur- 
chased a farm and was actively and successfully identified with agricultural in- 
terests throughout the remainder of his life, becoming widely recognized as a most 
successful farmer and enterprising citizen. 

In his youthful days Edgar Burras attended the district schools and also early 
became familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, 
giving his father the benefit of his services in the cultivation of the old home farm. 
The work of plowing, planting and harvesting has claimed his attention through- 
out his entire business career and as the years have passed by he has gained a credi- 
table measure of prosperity in his agricultural interests, the fields yielding their an- 
nual tribute of golden grain as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows 
upon them. 



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144 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

On the 31st of December, 1863, Mr. Burras was united in marriage to Miss 
Eudolphia Jennings, who was born April 15, 1843, a daughter of G. S. and Polly 
Ann (Wheeler) Jennings. The parents were natives of Connecticut and on coming 
to this county took up their abode in Fairfield township. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bur- 
ras were born three children : Edwin, Minnie and Elmer, all of whom are now mar- 
ried. Both Mr. Burras and his wife are devoted and consistent members of the 
Baptist church at North Fairfield and are highly esteemed in the community as 
people of genuine personal worth and sterling traits of character, having gained 
the confidence and regard of all with whom they have come in contact. Mr. Bur- 
ras has lived in this county all his life, covering a period of two-thirds of a century, 
and is therefore largely familiar with its annals from pioneer times down to the 
present. 



JAMES A. FANCHER. 



One of the most influential farmers of Greenwich township is the gentleman 
whose name heads this review. He is an ex-commissioner of the county and has 
'held many offices of public trust during a long and useful life. Mr. Fancher is 
a native of Greenwich township, born near the place where he now resides, No- 
vember 1, 1839, his parents being Daniel and Polly (Mitchell) Fancher. His 
father's people were natives of Connecticut, his grandfather, Thaddeus Fancher, 
removing from the Nutmeg state to Dutchess county, New York, and thence in 
1820 to Greenwich township, Huron county, Ohio. He was a harnessmaker by 
trade, but farmed during the latter portion of his life. Daniel Fancher reared 
a family of five children: Lorana, Moses, Belinda, Emily and James A. The 
father was a respected and highly successful farmer, owning some three hundred 
acres of choice land, which he had cleared of the heavy forest. His wife died in 
July, 1840, when the youngest son was but one year old, but the husband, surviv- 
ing her many years, passed away April 16, 1885. Daniel Fancher was a man 
of quiet tastes, revered by all classes for his many splendid traits of character. 
Originally a whig in politics, he became one of the founders of the republican 
party and throughout life consistently supported its policies. 

James A. Fancher thus grew up under the master hand of a skilled agricultur- 
ist, and on attaining his majority found himself splendidly equipped for the fur- 
ther development, along scientific lines, of the farm which came into his pos- 
session, his education being such as could be secured in the rather rudimentary 
country schools of the day. He has been twice married, his first wife, Barintha 
Brown, having died a year after their union, which occurred in October, 1861. 
Her father, Luther Brown, was a prominent citizen of Greenwich township. On 
February 9, 1864, Mr. Fancher married Miss Louisa M. Sutton, a daughter of 
Aranson and Emeline (Brady) Sutton, this family also being one of the pioneers 
in Greenwich township. The children born to this union are: Jennie B., Charles 
D. and Fred S., only the youngest of whom is living. Fred S. was educated for 
the ministry of the Methodist church, his scholastic training being obtained at 
the Ohio Weslcyan college, and his professional training at the Boston Theolog- 
ical school. He married Miss Lena Strimple, of Richland county, by whom he 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 147 

has two interesting children, and he is now a successful minister of the gospel at 
Bloomville, Seneca county, Ohio. 

James A. Fancher settled down to farming after marriage, and has tilled the 
ground consistently and persistently to the present day, prospering in his life 
work. A successful grower of other stock, he interests himself especially in 
sheep, of which particular animal he is a splendid judge. In its every appoint- 
ment his farm shows how nature responds to the mind that understands her. 

The life of James A. Fancher has been marked by fine public-spirit and an 
alertness to every movement which has looked to the betterment of society. Serv- 
ing faithfully in the minor offices of trustee and member of the board of educa- 
tion of his township, he has always given his support to that which would ele- 
vate the standard in each department Faithful to these minor trusts, he was 
selected by his party in 1887, as one of the commissioners of the county and again 
in 1890, serving six years. It is of record that at his second election he carried 
the county by more than sixteen hundred plurality. He points with pride to the 
work accomplished during his period of service, the present substantial sheriff's 
residence and county jail being completed during his first term, also the enlarge- 
ment of the county infirmary, and a system of county pike building being inaugu- 
rated, which will give to Huron county one of the best systems of roads of the 
state. All of these public matters were attended to with the same careful and 
considerate attention to detail which characterizes Mr. Fancher's private busi- 
ness. 

It will be understood that Mr. Fancher is a power in republican politics, his 
face being a familiar one at county and state conventions. He and his family 
are members of the Methodist church, in which they are active, both in church 
and Sunday-school, Mr. Fancher being superintendent and teacher of the latter 
for some thirty years. Judged by the standards of efficiency obtaining in Hu- 
ron county, and which are of a high order, James A. Fancher's life has been 
an unqualified success. 



JOHN JACOB SCHEID. 

John Jacob Scheid, a retired agriculturist of Sherman township, residing on his 
fine farm of two hundred and seventy-six acres, is now enjoying in well earned ease 
the fruits of his former toil. He was born in Germany on the 19th of January, 
1831, his parents being William and Lucetta Scheid. In 1849 the father deter- 
mined to establish his home in the United States and after an ocean voyage of for- 
ty-five days landed at New York city. He then went to Albany, New York, by 
boat, thence by train to Buffalo and by boat to Sandusky, Ohio. From that city 
he came to Huron county via the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, which had been com- 
pleted just a year previous. On arriving in this county he first took up his abode 
at Hunts Corners and subsequently located in Peru township, where he purchased 
a farm of one hundred and fifty acres. He was not long permitted to enjoy his 
new home, however, being called to his final rest in 1853, when fifty-eight years of 
age. His wife, surviving him for a number of years, passed away when she had 



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148 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

attained the age of sixty-four. Unto this worthy couple were born eight children, 
as follows : Jane, who is deceased, as is likewise her husband, Christopher Lantz ; 
William, who has also passed away; Elizabeth, whose demise occurred in Ger- 
many ; Kathryn E., deceased ; Kathryn, the second of the name, who is the widow 
of Henry Rowe ; John Jacob, of this review ; and Minnie and Christopher, both 
of whom have passed away. 

John Jacob Scheid was a young man of eighteen years when he came with his 
parents to Peru township and here he has since continued to make his home. He 
had attended school in the fatherland but after coming to this country his time 
was entirely taken up with the arduous labor incident to the development of a new 
farm. General agriculural pursuits have claimed his attention throughout his en- 
tire business career and he is now the owner of a highly improved and valuable 
farm of two hundred and seventy-six acres in Sherman township, which is at 
present being operated by his sons, as he has put aside the active work of the fields 
and is living retired. The commodious brick residence standing on the property 
was erected by him in 1865. 

In February, 1857. Mr. Scheid was joined in wedlock to Miss Barbara Bilstein, 
a native of Germany. Their union was blessed with eleven children, namely: 
Elizabeth, who is deceased ; Emma, who lives at home with her parents ; Charles, 
who wedded Miss Louisa Boehler, by whom he has four children, Mabel, Ada, 
Olive and Marion ; Henry, living in Sherman township, who married Miss Rose 
Korndorfer and has three children, Helen, Dora and Clara ; George and Minnie, 
both of whom are at home ; John, residing near Havana, Ohio, who wedded Ger- 
trude Scheid, by whom he has two children, Harold and Catherine; Fred and Al- 
bert, who are also under the parental rcof ; and two who passed away in infancy. 

In politics Mr. Scheid is a stanch republican and has served in the position of 
road supervisor and also as a member of the election board. He is a prominent 
and valued member of the Lutheran church, which he assisted in erecting and in 
which he has held various official positions, acting as treasurer for thirteen years. 
He is most widely and favorably known throughout the community in which he 
has now resided for six decades and to his many friends is known as "Uncle 
Jacob." His life has always been a busy and useful one and in this country, where 
labor is unhampered by caste or class, he has won a measure of prosperity that 
now enables him to spend his remaining days amid all of the comforts and many 
of the luxuries which go to make life worth living. 



EDGAR GRANT SILL1MAN. 

Edgar Grant Silliman is cultivating a farm of one hundred and forty-nine acres 
in Fairfield township and is an agriculturist whose well directed energy and keen 
foresight are bringing to him a creditable measure of prosperity. He was born 
in Fairfield township. Huron county, Ohio, on the 1st of September, 1865, his pa- 
rents being George and Mary (Keeler) Silliman, both of whom were natives of 
Connecticut. The father's birth occurred in Bridgeport, that state, on the 20th of 
August, 181 5, and the mother was born in the year 1830. Their marriage was eel- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 149 

ebrated on the 8th of January, 1855. The maternal grandparents of Edgar G. 
Silliman were Burr and Mary E. (Nash) Keeler, likewise natives of Connecticut. 
George and Mary (Keeler) Silftman reared a family of two daughters and one son, 
namely: Flora, Bertha and Edgar Grant. 

The last named pursued his education in the district schools and remained un^ 
der the parental roof until the time of his marriage. He then made his home west 
of North Fairfield until 1892 in which year he purchased his present farm of one 
hundred and forty-nine acres and has since devoted his time and energies to its cul- 
tivation and improvement. He has made it a model farm and everything about the 
place indicates his thrifty spirit and enterprising efforts. His labors in the fields 
are annually rewarded by rich and abundant harvests and he is widely recognized 
as one of the progressive and successful agriculturists of the community. 

On the 19th of June 1889 Mr. Silliman was united in marriage to Miss Elfie A. 
Smith whose birth occurred on the 30th of July, 1867, her parents being Watson 
Frederick and Mary (Joiner) Smith, of Greenfield township, Huron county, 
Ohio. Her paternal grandparents, Abel and Jerusha (Brooks) Smith, who were 
natives of Rome, New York, took up their abode in Greenfield township, this coun- 
ty, about 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Silliman are now the parents of three children, as fol- 
lows: Alma M., who was born June 15, 1890; Burr George, who first opened his 
eyes to the light of day on the 17th of August, 1892; and Arthur L., born De- 
cember 27, 1894. 

Fraternally Mr. Silliman is identified with the Maccabees, while his religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Congregational church, in which he is 
serving as clerk and trustee. Both he and his wife have always resided in this 
county and are most widely and favorably known within its borders, the circle of 
their friends being almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintances. 



COLONEL JAMES H. SPRAGUE. 

This name at once suggests a power in manufacturing circles in Huron county, 
for Colonel James H. Sprague is at the head of the Sprague Umbrella Company, 
which he organized in 1892, with a capital stock of forty thousand dollars and a 
surplus of two hundred thousand dollars. Colonel Sprague was born in New York 
city, February 15, 1846, a son of Judge James Sprague, of Auburn, New York, 
who was a captain in the Mexican war. The great-great-great-grandfather of our 
subject was Major Josiah Sprague, who was a leader of the Sons of Liberty, who, 
opposed to the importation of tea into the colonies, in 1773 threw overboard a large 
amount of tea at the Boston harbor. He was also a member of the Society of the 
Cincinnatis. The great-great-grandfather was a colonel in the war of 1812, while 
his son, the great-grandfather of our subject, was a major in the same war. 

Colonel James H. Sprague, reared in the place of his nativity, acquired his edu- 
cation in Red Creek Union Academy, from which he was graduated, after which 
he entered Pulaski Academy of New York, graduating from that institution. He 
also attended school in Watertown, New York. In 1861, when but a youth of four- 



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150 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

teen years, he entered the volunteer service in the Nineteenth New York Volunteer 
Infantry, becoming a sergeant of Company A, Captain Charles Stewart command- 
ing. He was in the first battle of Bull Run, after which he was detailed for guard 
duty at the White House in Washington, District of Columbia. After six months 
thus spent he was detailed in the secret service under Secretary Staunton, filling 
the latter position until 1864. At that time the regiment being changed from in- 
fantry to light artillery, Colonel Sprague joined his company, being promoted to 
second lieutenant of the same. Following the battle of Fort Wagner, for brave 
and meritorious service at the front, he was promoted to first lieutenant, later be- 
coming captain and having command of Battery F, Coast Division, under General 
Foster. He took part in many notable engagements, always discharging his duties 
in a most creditable manner. He was taken prisoner at Pocatalego, South Caro- 
lina, and was taken to Charleston, South Carolina, where he was held for three 
weeks, when he made his escape and returned to his battery. He was mustered out 
of service at Charlestown, South Carolina, in June, 1865. 

Returning to his home, Colonel Sprague became manager of McLean's circus, 
remaining in that position until 1869, when he came to Norwalk, Ohio. He se- 
cured a position with B. Courtright, as traveling salesman, selling fanning mills, 
but after a time thus spent he traveled for the Norwalk Tobacco Company, selling 
their goods. From 1876 until 1882 he was attorney for D. M. Osborne & Com- 
pany, who handled harvesting machines and binders. Eventually Colonel Sprague 
became general manager of the Piano Harvester & Binder Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Chicago, Illinois, his territory covering Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky 
and Tennessee. He continued with this company until 1886 and then feeling justi- 
fied in entering business on his own account, he organized the firm of Sprague & 
French, manufacturers of advertising novelties. He was quite successful in this 
venture, securing the capital which in 1892 enabled him to organize the Sprague 
Umbrella Company of Norwalk. From the beginning he has been the president 
and general manager and also owns the greater share of the capital stock, amount- 
ing to forty thousand dollars, with a surplus of two hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. They manufacture auto tops, wind shields, wagon umbrellas, carriage and 
lawn canopies, etc., and employ over two hundred people in the manufacture of 
these various articles. They also have their own plant and real estate. Their an- 
nual sales now amount to from two hundred and fifty to three hundred thousand 
dollars. In addition to their Norwalk office they have a branch office in New York 
city and also one in San Francisco, their sales extending to all parts of the world. 
The success of the firm is due largely to the efforts of Colonel Sprague, who has 
spared no energy in bringing it to its present mammoth proportions, for the 
Sprague Umbrella Company has won a world-wide reputation. 

It was on the 30th of May, 1869, that Colonel Sprague was united in marriage 
to Miss Eliza A. Cunningham, who was born in Ohio, in August, 1848. A great 
lover of music the Colonel has given much attention to composition. He set to 
band music the words of the popular song, Dixie, written by Daniel D. Emmet, at 
Mr. Emmet's request, and he likewise composed both words and music for My 
Dear Ohio Home and the Great White Throne, and many others of equal popu- 
larity. In this regard he has received complimentary letters from such men as the 
lamented President McKinley, General Corbin, General Miles and others. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 151 

Prominent in fraternal circles, Colonel Sprague is a valued member of the So- 
ciety of the Ohio Commandery of Military Order of Foreign Wars, member of the 
Ohio Association Ex-prisoners of War and is senior vice commander of the depart- 
ment of Ohio, G. A. R. He is a Mason in high standing, belonging to Al Koran 
Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, is past eminent commander of Nor- 
waik Commandery, No. 18, K. T., and past exalted ruler of Norwalk Lodge, No. 
730, B. P. O. E., while he also holds membership relations with the Grand Army 
of the Republic, Loyal Legion, Odd Fellows, United Commercial Travelers, Red 
Men, Royal Arcanum, National Union, Ohio Society of New York and the Auto As- 
sociation of America. His political allegiance is evidenced by the stanch support 
which he gives to the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by his 
frendliness to the Presbyterian church. 

A man of domestic tastes, Mr. Sprague finds his chief pleasure in ministering 
to the welfare of his wife, to whom he is most devoted. While his success in the 
business world is very marked, yet it has been won through strict adherence to 
honorable methods. In business, as well as in social and fraternal circles, he has 
shown a talent for leading, and although crowned with wealth, he today stands in 
the sjtme relation to his fellowmen as he did in early years when struggling for a 
livelihood, recognizing and appreciating honest purpose and genuine worth and 
rating the individual by his merits and not by his possessions. 



THOMAS HAGAMAN. 



The Hagaman family is an old and prominent one in Bronson township and 
Huron county, representatives of the name having settled here in the days of its 
early pioneer development. Thomas Hagaman, the subject of this review, fully 
sustained the reputation that had always been borne by his ancestors and thus the 
community lost one of its most valued citizens, when, on the 28th of September, 
1905, he passed to his final reward. 

Mr. Hagaman was born August 20, 1834, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Haga- 
man, residents of Bronson township. He was of Holland descent, his ancestors 
in both the paternal and maternal lines having come from that country to the 
United States in an early day. The paternal grandparents were Thomas and Nel- 
lie (Burnett) Hagaman, the former born in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It was 
their son John who became the father of our subject Coming to Huron county in 
early times, John Hagaman settled on a tract of land in Bronson township and this 
property has been in possession of the family to the present time. He died in 1870. 
The only surviving sister of our subject is Mrs. Isabel Snook, a resident of Huron 
county. 

Thomas Hagaman was reared on the old home farm, which later became his 
property. He was early trained to the work of the fields, assisting his father during 
the season of plowing, planting and harvesting, while in the winter months he pur- 
sued his studies in the district schools. He always followed the occupation to 
which he had been reared and in the operation of the old home place carried on 
the work of development and improvement that had been begun by his father. He 



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152 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

became not only a successful man but was one of the highly esteemed citizens of 
his community. The Hagemans have ever been known for their probity and up- 
rightness and Thomas Hagaman fully sustained that reputation. 

Mr. Hagaman was twice married. His first wife bore the maiden name of 
Mary E. Woodruff and her death occurred January 2, 1879. She left two chil- 
dren, a <on, John E. Hageman, of Cleveland ; and daughter, Mrs. Jessie Kennedy, 
of Oberlin, Ohio. Mr. Hagaman was again married in 1895, his second union 
being with Mrs. Melissa (Severns) Henry, who was born October 13, 1853. By 
her former marriage she has three children who survive, namely : Frederick Se- 
verns Henry ; Nellie G. Henry ; and Elizabeth Henry, now the wife of C. M. 
Crawford. All completed the high-school course in Norwalk and the son spent 
one year in Kenyon College. 

Loyal to the best interests of his country, Mr. Hagaman enlisted in the Civil 
war as a member of Company B, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, in which he did valiant service. His religious faith was manifest by his 
membership in the Congregational church, in which he served as a deacon. He 
was a true friend, and thus a deep feeling of sadness spread throughout the com- 
munity when on the 28th of September, 1905, it was announced that he had 
passed from this life, but while those who knew him remain, his memory will be 
cherished, not so much on account of the success which he achieved in business 
but because of his life of helpfulness, of good cheer, of broad sympathy, and his 
deep interest in and labors for the benefit of his fellowmen. His life span covered 
seventy-one years — years of helpfulness to his community, of loyalty to his coun- 
try, and of devotion to his family and friends. 



SAMUEL SHERMAN. 



Samuel Sherman, who since April, 1901, has lived retired in Monroeville, 
was formerly actively and successfully identified with agricultural interests and 
is still the owner of three hundred acres of land in Huron county. His birth oc- 
curred in Huntingtonshire, England, on the 9th of March, 1838, his parents be- 
ing William A. and Sarah (Lane) Sherman. In 1852 he crossed the Atlantic 
in company with his father and settled in Huron county, Ohio. At the end of 
a year, however, the father returned to England, leaving his son Samuel with 
Mr. Husted, for whom the lad was to work until he had attained his majority. 
He proved so capable and diligent an apprentice, however, that when he was 
twenty years of age Mr. Husted gave him one hundred dollars and told him that 
his term of indenture would be considered ended. He then operated the Husted 
farm for a couple of years and subsequently was engaged in the cultivation of 
rented land for a time. 

By dint of untiring labor and close economy he at length accumulated suffi- 
cient capital with which to purchase a farm of his own and in 1865 bought thirty- 
five acres of land from George Sawyer, which has since remained in his posses- 
sion and is known as the old Sherman homestead. As time passed and his finan- 
cial resources increased he added to his acreage until he became the owner of 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 155 

considerable land in this county, winning wide and favorable recognition as a 
most successful and energetic agriculturist. In April, 1901, he put aside the 
active work of the fields and has since lived retired in Monroeville, enjoying in 
well earned ease the fruits of his former toil. He still owns three hundred acres 
of rich and productive land in this county and has justly won the proud Ameri- 
can title of a self-made man, for the prosperity which has crowned his labors has 
come entirely as the result of earnest, persistent and well directed effort, keen 
discrimination and capable management. 

On the 28th of May, i860, Mr. Sherman was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary 
Ann Carpenter, who was born in England on the 20th of March, 1843, her 
father being William Carpenter, likewise a native of that country. In 1858 she 
accompanied her uncle and aunt on their emigration to the new world and took 
up her abode in Huron county, Ohio. By her marriage she became the mother 
of seven children, as follows : George, who is mentioned on another page of this 
work ; John D. ; Samuel, a sketch of whom also appears in this volume ; Edward 
A., who married Miss Minnie Rape and makes his home in Lyme township; 
Joseph H., deceased, who wedded Miss Minnie Seible; Luella, residing in Lyme 
township, who gave her hand in marriage to John Koch, by whom she has two 
sons, Melvin T. and Forest William; and Alice, at home. The wife and mother 
was called to her final rest on Christmas day of 1908 and her demise was the oc- 
casion of deep and widespread regret, for her many good traits of heart and 
mind had won her an extensive circle of warm friends. Mr. Sherman is a ves- 
tryman in the Episcopal church, the teachings of which permeate his life. He has 
now made his home within the borders of this county for fifty-seven years and 
that his career has ever been above reproach is indicated by the fact that he is 
best liked where best known. 



ELMER SAMUEL BURRAS. 

An excellent farm of eighty acres in Fairfield township pays tribute to the care 
and labor of Elmer Samuel Burras, who has been in possession of the property 
since 1900. His birth occurred in Fairfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 
3d of August, 1876, his parents being Edgar and Eudolpha (Jennings) Burras, 
who were likewise natives of Fairfield township, this county. Their children were 
three in number : Minnie, Edwin and Elmer, all of whom are now married. 

With the exception of two years spent at the carpenter's trade, Elmer Samuel 
Burras has devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits through- 
out his entire business career. In the year 1900 he purchased his present farm of 
eighty acres, and the crops which he annually harvests bring to him a gratifying 
income. 

On the 18th of November, 1900, Mr. Burras was united in marriage to Miss 
Lena Lamoureaux, who was born in Fairfield township, this county, on the 5th 
of December, 1879. Her parents, Homer and Emma Lamoureuax, reared a family 
of six children, namely: Harry, William, George, Verna, Ruth and Lena. Mr. 



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156 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

and Mrs. Burras are now the parents of three daughters and two sons, as follows : 
Dorothy, Mar jorie, Merle, Myles and Leslie. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Burras has given his 
political allegiance to the republican party and is now serving as a member of the 
school board. He belongs to the Grange and is also a devoted member of the 
Methodist church, the teachings of which he exemplifies in his daily life. In the 
community where they have always resided both he and his wife are well known 
and highly esteemed, having ever displayed those sterling traits of character which 
in every land and clime awaken confidence and regard. 



GEORGE BOWEN. 



George Bowen, who is well known in Clarksfield township as a prosperous 
farmer, a miller and a man of affairs, was born May 29, 1847, in Norwich town- 
ship, Huron county, Ohio, and is the son of John and Christine (Robinson) 
Bowen. The mother was a native of Coshocton county, but the father's place of 
biith was New Jersey. He was a farmer and an extensive landowner, was pros- 
perous in his affairs, and took an active part in the public administration of local 
government. In addition to his large farming interests, he was an extensive manu- 
facturer of bricks and a mason and contractor for brick work construction, and 
when he died, in August, 1880, he was mourned as a man whose efforts had not 
only brought him success, but whose influence had been good in the community 
where he lived. When he married he was living in Coshocton county, moving to 
Norwich township, Huron county, in 1836. A family of four sons and four 
daughters was born to him and his wife : Martha J., Agnes, John M., William K., 
Henry C, Elizabeth C, George and Malinda C. Of these Martha J. and Henry 
C. have passed away. Mrs. Bowen survived her husband twenty years to the very 
month, dying in August, 1900. 

George Bowen spent his youth on his father's farm and was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Norwich. He married at the age of twenty-three and engaged in 
farming in Norwich township, which remained his home until 1907, when he 
moved to Clarksfield and purchased the Clarksfield Gristmill and entered upon mill- 
ing as a business. The mill he bought was the oldest in point of service in Huron 
county, for it was built seventy-three years ago and has been in general use since. 
Now, however, the old stone burrs and water power have given way to the roller 
process and to steam power, and equipped with the best of modern improvements 
it is well able to take care of the large exchange business that is carried on between 
the farmers, the latter receiving for their grain, feed and flour. In the two years 
that Mr. Bowen and his son have had the management of it, it is estimated that it 
does a larger business than any other mill in the county. Aside from these private 
interests of his, Mr. Bowen has always evinced a deep concern for the public weal. 
For a number of years he served his community well as road supervisor and as a 
member of the board of education, in both of which capacities he allied himself ac- 
tively with those working for progress and improvement. When called upon to 
vote, the republican candidate receives his support. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 157 

In December, 1870, Mr. Bowen married Miss Alice P. Burdge, the daughter of 
William and Mary (Miller) Burdge. Her father was a soldier in the Civil war, 
and up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1904, was a farmer of Norwich 
township. Mrs. Burdge is still living. Two sons, Edison E. and Roscoe, were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowen. Both are residents of Clarksfield township and are 
mainly concerned with agriculture. The elder was born June 16, 1876, and grow- 
ing up under his father's care entered upon farming, which he pursued until 1907, 
when he engaged with the latter in the grain and milling business. On the 16th of 
June, 1901, he was married to Miss Grace E. Brown, the daughter of Franklin H. 
and Ella (Wood) Brown, of Norwich township, and is now the father of three 
children, Joy, Bertha and Herbert. He is a fine business man, a republican in poli- 
tics, and very active in all that concerns the welfare of the community. Roscoe 
Bowen was born on the 1st of November, 1880, and has followed the life of a 
farmer. He was united in marriage to Miss Cora Sees, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin C. Sees, September 4, 1902, and the couple have been blessed with 
two daughters, Gladys and Mary. Like his brother and father, Roscoe Bowen has 
always been a republican, and like them also he is a good citizen, closely identified 
with the best interests of the township. 

Mr. Bowen is a loyal Mason and a member of Attica Lodge, No. 367. In 
past years he also belonged to several other organizations, to Norwich Grange, to 
the Patrons of Husbandry and to the Good Templars, and has ever been a strong 
temperance advocate. He and his family affiliate with the United Brethren church, 
and have always been supporters of all measures calculated to uplift humanity and 
better conditions morally, socially and commercially. Hence he and his two sons 
are among the best citizens that Clarksfield township can claim and by their lives 
give an example to others. 



WILLIAM HAMILTON McPHERSON, JR. 

William Hamilton McPherson, Jr., a well known and successful agriculturist 
and stock breeder of Fairfield township, is the owner of an excellent farm of one 
hundred and one and a fourth acres. His birth occurred in Greenfield township, 
Huron county, Ohio, on the 1st of January, 1875, his parents being W. H. and 
Lucy (Wheeler) McPherson, who were also natives of Greenfield township. The 
paternal grandfather, James McPherson, came to the United States from Ireland, 
taking up his abode in Greenfield township, this county. Unto him and his wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Ann Jane Arthur, were born three children : John, 
George and William Hamilton. The maternal grandfather of our subject was 
John Henry Wheeler. W. H. McPherson, Sr., the father of the gentleman whose 
name initiates this review, was twice married and by his first wife had three chil- 
dren, namely : Arthur, Scott and William Hamilton. Subsequent to the death of 
his first wife he wedded Miss Maggie Much, residing near Bellevue, and their 
union was blessed with two children, Clyde and Glenn. 

In his youthful days William H. McPherson, Jr., attended the district schools 
and also assisted in the work of the home farm, so that he early became familiar 



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158 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

with all the varied duties that claim the attention of the agriculturist. In the 
year 1904 he came from Greenfield township to Fairfield township, where he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and one and a fourth acres, to the cultivation of 
which he has since devoted his time and energies. In addition to raising the cereals 
best adapted to soil and climate he is also engaged in the breeding of Delaine sheep, 
Duroc hogs and Jersey cattle, both branches of his business returning to him a 
gratifying annual income. He is the groom for "Fancher," the imported Per- 
cheron stallion owned by the North Fairfield Percheron Horse Company. 

On the 8th of April, 1896, Mr. McPherson was united in marriage to Miss 
Cora Lucile Fitch, a native of Genesee county, Michigan, and a daughter of Edgar 
and Letta (Ward) Fitch. Her father still survives and lives in Michigan. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fitch reared a family of five daughters and one son, as follows : Nina, 
Lena, Bessie, Lucy, Letta and Archie. One child is deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
McPherson have been born the following children : Carl, Everett, Nina Pearl, Les- 
ter and Edith Margaret. Mr. McPherson, who has made his home in Huron 
county throughout his entire life, is well entitled to mention in this volume as one 
of its prosperous and enterprising farmers and stockmen and also as a worthy rep- 
resentative of a family that has figured in the annals of the county from pioneer 
times down to the present. 



GEORGE BARMAN. 



George Barman, who owns and operates an excellent farm of one hundred and 
thirty-three acres in Peru township, is numbered among the worthy native sons of 
Huron county, his birth having occurred in a little log cabin in Peru township on 
the 15th of June, 1856. His parents, Philip and Mary (Fisher) Barman, were both 
natives of Germany. When seventeen years of age the father accompanied his pa- 
rents, Mr. and Mrs. Bradous Barman, on their emigration to the United States, 
the family home being established in the German settlement in Peru township, Hu- 
ron county, Ohio. The grandfather erected a log cabin and set himself to the 
task of clearing the timber from a tract of sixty acres which he had purchased, for 
at that time this entire region was still largely wild and undeveloped. Both he 
and his wife continued to reside here until called to their final rest. 

As before stated, Philip Barman, the father of our subject, was a young man 
of seventeen years on his arrival in Peru township and here he made his home until 
the time of his demise, which occurred in June, 1887, when he had attained the age 
of seventy-four years. He devoted his time and energies to general agricultural 
pursuits throughout his active business career and owned a farm of fifty acres in 
the southern portion of Peru township. His wife, who had made the voyage to 
this country in early life in company with her brother, passed away in 1892 at the 
age of seventy-four years. Unto this worthy couple were born eight children, 
namely : John, who is a resident of Peru township ; Philip, whose demise occurred 
when he was fifty-six years of age; Mary Ann, the deceased wife of Thomas 
Bishop ; George, of this review ; Frank, living in Peru township ; Kathryn, who is 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 159 

the widow of Peter Hipp and makes her home in Peru township ; Louisa, who is 
deceased ; and Rose, the wife of Alf Remelly, of Peru township. 

George Barman obtained his education in the district and Catholic schools and 
when not busy with his text-books gave his father the benefit of his services in the 
cultivation of the old home farm, thus early gaining practical knowledge of the best 
methods of tilling the soil. General agricultural pursuits have always claimed his 
attention and that his choice of a life work was a wise one is proven by the gratify- 
ing measure of prosperity which has rewarded his efforts along this line. In 
1902 he bought the farm of one hundred and thirty-three acres on which he now 
resides from Alfonzo Smith and has made a number of substantial improvements 
on the property. The neat and thrifty appearance of the place indicates the super- 
vision of a practical and progressive owner, whose well directed labors are annually 
rewarded by rich harvests. 

On the 19th of June, 1883, Mr. Barman was united in marriage to Miss Louisa 
Hipp, a native of Peru township and a daughter of Andrew and Regina Hipp, 
both of whom were born in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Barman now have a family 
of six children, as follows: Andrew, living in Ridgefield township, who wedded 
Katie Wise, by whom he has one child, Clarence ; and Benjamin, Charles, Elmer, 
Roman and Clatus, all of whom are still under the parental roof. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Barman has given his 
political allegiance to the men and measures of the democracy and has capably 
served his fellow townsmen in the positions of road supervisor and school direc- 
tor. In religious faith he is a Catholic. Both he and his wife are widely and fa- 
vorably known throughout the community in which their entire lives have been 
passed and well merit the regard and esteem which is uniformly accorded them. 



ALBERT G. BEDFORD. 

The name of Bedford has been known in Huron county from pioneer times, and 
he whose name introduces this record is a worthy representative of the family. He 
is a native of the county, his birth having occurred on a farm in Townsend town- 
ship, December 23, 1865, and is a son of Robert and Phoebe (Stacy) Bedford. 
The father followed farming throughout his entire life, and was a well known pio- 
neer of his section of the county. His death occurred many years ago. 

Albert G. Bedford, whose name introduces this review, acquired his education 
in the district schools of Townsend township and remained under the parental roof 
until he had attained the age of twenty years, during which time he had been 
thoroughly trained to habits of industry, assisting in the care and operation of the 
home farm up to that time. Feeling that he might be more independent if he ven- 
tured out in the business world, he accordingly started out for himself but his fa- 
ther's death occurring shortly afterward, he was needed by his widowed mother to 
care for the farm and, returning home, he took up the responsible duties of operat- 
ing his mother's land. After about two years thus engaged he once more started 
out for himself, being employed at farm labor until the time of his marriage, after 
which he worked for his father-in-law by the month for a time. Then, feeling jus- 



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160 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

tified in engaging in farming on his own account, he rented a tract of land, which 
lie operated until 1902. He had in the meantime saved a sum sufficient to invest 
in land and thus became the owner of ninety-four acres in Hartford Ridge, which 
he occupied until March, 1909. 

It was in March, 1509, that he was appointed by the infirmary directors as su- 
perintendent of the Huron county infirmary, and his popularity is evidenced by the 
fact that he received not only the support of his own party but the support of many 
republicans as well, he being the first democrat ever appointed to this office in Hu- 
ron county. This farm comprises two hundred and four acres, situated about a 
mile and a half south-east of Norwalk. The home contains from sixty-five to sev- 
enty inmates, most of whom are very feeble. Mr. Bedford has already far out- 
reached the expectations of his fellow citizens in the care and management of this 
infirmary, and it being an instance of where the position sought the man, rather 
than the man seeking the position, the public has every reason to feel that their 
choice has been a wise one and they have placed the right man in the right place. 
In his short term of service Mr. Bedford has made some changes which are prov- 
ing very beneficial and will also be a saving to tax-payers. By his courteous treat- 
ment and kindly manner he has won the good will of each and every inmate, while 
his estimable wife, a woman of most kindly disposition, cares for the household in 
a most able manner, an air of neatness and cleanliness pervading the various de- 
partments over which she has charge. 

It was in 1870 that Mr. Bedford wedded Miss Dora E. Minor, a daughter of 
Oliver Minor, of Hartland township. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bedford has 
been blessed with two children : Give A., who was born in 1896; and May C, born 
in 1905. Mr. Bedford deserves much praise for what he has accomplished in a busi- 
ness sense, for he started out in the humble capacity of a farm hanc and today is 
the owner of a good tract of land and is also supervising interests which none but 
those possessing only the most charitable nature and excellent managerial quali- 
ties could so capably control. 



F. G. LAIBLE. 



F. G. Laible, who is engaged in the undertaking business in Norwalk, was 
born in Michigan on the 29th of March, 1875. His father, George F. Laible, 
was likewise a native of that state, born on the 22d of February, 1845. He de- 
voted his entire life to general agricultural pursuits and died in 1893. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Josephine Russell, was a native of Lorain county, 
Ohio, and a daughter of Daniel Wright Russell, one of the pioneers of that 
county who came to this state from New York. Mrs. Laible still survives her 
husband and is now living in Norwalk. 

In the country schools F. G. Laible acquainted himself with the common 
branches of English learning and afterward continued his studies at Owosso, 
Michigan. On putting aside his text-books he learned the bicycle business, 
worked in a bicycle factory for a time and afterward embarked in the same line 
of business on his own account in Owosso, Michigan. In 1897 he went to 



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F. G. LATBLE 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 163 

Grand Rapids, where he learned the undertaking business and in 1901 he came 
to Norwalk where he joined his uncle, Addison Sigourney, in the conduct of 
an undertaking establishment on Benedict avenue. After a brief period A. C. 
Holiday purchased Mr. Sigourney's interest and became a partner. This rela- 
tion was maintained until 1907, when Mr. Holiday withdrew from the business 
and Mr. Laible became sole proprietor. He has since continued in this field of 
labor and has a well appointed undertaking establishment, which is liberally 
patronized by those who need his services. He also conducts a retail flower 
store, making his own floral designs in conjunction with his undertaking busi- 
ness. This has proven to be a profitable venture and a clever idea. 

In October, 1904, Mr. Laible married Miss Dorothy E. Zuick, a daughter 
of John Daniel Zuick, who came to Huron county during the early girlhood of 
Mrs. Laible. Unto them have been born two sons, George Forest, whose birth 
occurred July 19, 1905 ; and John Brandt, born June 20, 1909. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Laible is a Mason, holding membership in 
Mount Vernon Lodge and in the Knight Templar Commandery. He also be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Maccabees, 
while his religious faith is manifest in his membership in the Baptist church. 
He started out in life with nothing to aid him at the outset of his career, but by 
persistent and earnest purpose he has made steady progress and is now conduct- 
ing a profitable business. 



JOHN TERRY WALSWORTH. 

John Terry Walsworth is a wide-awake and enterprising farmer, owning and 
operating a tract of land of one hundred acres in Fairfield township. He was born 
in Peru township, Huron county, on the 23d of October, 1854, his parents beingr 
Philander and Lucy (Reeves) Walsworth, the former a native of New York. Sub- 
sequent to their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Philander Walsworth came to Ohio and 
here established their home and reared their family, numbering four sons and one 
•daughter, namely: Elijah C, Joel P., Daniel F. ? John T. and Mary Elizabeth. 

John Terry Walsworth left the parental roof at the age of eleven years and 
went to live with Harvey Pierce, of Peru township, with whom he remained until 
Tie had attained his majority, receiving his schooling and two hundred dollars in 
•cash as remuneration for his services to this gentleman. A man of strong purpose 
and unfaltering energy, he then resolutely set to work in the hope of one day own- 
ing a farm of his own and that his efforts have met with a just reward is indicated 
"by the fact that he is now in possession of a well improved and valuable tract of 
land of one hundred acres in Fairfield township and is comfortably situated finan- 
cially. He purchased this property about nine years ago and has been successfully 
and energetically engaged in its cultivation and improvement to the present time, 
annually harvesting good crops which find a ready sale on the market. From an 
early age he has depended upon his own resources and has won the proud Ameri- 
can title of a self-made man. 



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164 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

On the 29th of November, 1880, Mr. Walsworth was united in marriage to 
Miss Alice E. Collingwood, whose birth occurred on the 7th of February, 1852, 
her parents being Jonathan and Eliza (Munsel) Collingwood, of Hartland town- 
ship, Huron county. Her father was born in York county, Pennsylvania, but her 
mother came from Gaylon, Wayne county, New York. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Col- 
lingwood were born eight children, as follows: James, Amos, Elmer, Harvey, 
Martha, Alice E., Rebecca, and one who died in infancy, Betsey Ann. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Walsworth belong to the Baptist church at North Fairfield 
and the former has sung in the choir during the entire period of his membership 
in the church, being the only tenor in the chorus. He has also served as a member 
of the finance committee at different times and takes an active and helpful interest 
in the various departments of the church work. He has an "extensive circle of warm 
friends throughout the county in which he has made his home from his birth to the 
present time, for in all life's relations he has been true to high and honorable "prin- 
ciples and has never faltered in a choice between right and wrong but has always 
endeavored to follow a course that his judgment and his conscience have sanctioned. 



MARTIN BEEBE, M. D. 

Dr. Martin Beebe, whose demise occurred on the 28th of March, 1890, was suc- 
cessfully engaged in the practice of medicine in Huron county for more than two 
decades and at the same time also superintended his farming interests in Clarks- 
field township. His birth occurred at Dover, Lenawee county, Michigan, on the 
1st of September, 1836, his parents being George and Vesta (Porter) Beebe. They 
made their way from Massachusetts to Michigan at an early day, becoming pioneer 
settlers of the Peninsular state. About the year 1840 they came to this state, tak- 
ing up their abode in Norwich township, Huron county. 

Brought to this county by his parents in childhood days, Martin Beebe obtained 
his primary education in the district schools of Norwich township and later at- 
tended a select school at Norwalk. In 1863 he entered the Western Reserve Med- 
ical College at Cleveland and was graduated from that institution with the degree 
of M. D. in 1866. On the 27th of December, 1865, he had wedded Miss Mary L. 
Barrett, who was born October 29, 1843, a daughter of Augustus and Clarissa 
(Cochran) Barrett, of Clarksfield township. Mr. Barrett was a native of Mon- 
roe county, New York, and his wife of Vermont. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Beebe were 
born two sons, namely: Augustus C, whose birth occurred January 12, 1867, and 
who now resides in Cleveland, where he is engaged in business ; and George P., 
born October 11, 1871, who resides on the old family homestead in Clarksfield 
township. 

Subsequent to his marriage Dr. Beebe lived in Wakeman for a year and also 
spent a similar period in Oberlin but did not engage in the practice of his profes- 
sion. He then returned to the college for a year's review, afterward took up his 
abode on his farm in Clarksfield township, this county, and began the practice of 
medicine. He continued as a successful and able representative of his chosen call- 
ing until the time of his death and became the loved family physician in many a 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 165 

household. In addition to his labors as a medical practitioner he also superintended 
his farm and in both his professional and agricultural interests met with a gratify- 
ing measure of prosperity. 

Dr. Beebe gave his political allegiance to the men and measures of the demo- 
cracy and was active in public affairs. His fraternal relations were with the Ma- 
sons, while religiously he was identified with the Disciple church, being a valued 
and exemplary member of both organizations. He was a man of decided literary 
tastes and attainments and stood high in the estimation of men in all walks of life. 
He was called to his final rest on the 28th of March, 1890, when fifty-four years of 
age, and his remains were interred at New London, Ohio. Uniformly loved and 
respected, his loss came as a deep blow to his large circle of friends as well as to 
his immediate family. 

Subsequent to her husband's demise Mrs. Beebe managed the estate for some 
years with singular ability but in later years the care and responsibility incident to 
its supervision has largely devolved upon her younger son, George P. Beebe. The 
latter is also engaged in the breeding of thoroughbred draft and coach horses, hav- 
ing a wide and enviable reputation in this connection. The buildings on the old 
home farm are all modern and well adapted for their several uses and in fact every- 
thing about the place presents a neat and thrifty appearance. The residence, mod- 
ern in its construction and furnishings, is one of the most attractive country homes 
in the entire county. 

On the 24th of November, 1892, George P. Beebe was united in marriage to 
Miss Winifred Rowland, a daughter of William and Rosetta (Peck) Rowland. 
Both the Rowland and Peck families were early pioneer settlers of this county and 
became prominent and influential residents here. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Beebe have 
been born two children, Charles A. and Mary R. Politically Mr. Beebe is a stal- 
wart advocate of the republican party, while fraternally he is identified with the 
Eagles. 

Mrs. Beebe, the widow of Dr. Martin Beebe, is a devoted and faithful member 
of the Disciples church, taking an active and helpful interest in its work. She lives 
on the old homestead farm in Clarksfield township with her son and his family, and 
enjoys in unqualified measure the kindly regard and friendship of all who know 
her. 



JOHN FEICHTNER. 

John Feichtner, owning and operating a rich and productive farm of sixty- 
nine acres in Fairfield township, was born in New Haven township, Huron county, 
Ohio, on the 13th of August, 1878, his parents being George and Eliza (Layer) 
Feichtner. The father, who was a native of Crawford county, Ohio, took up his 
abode in New Haven township, this county, about 1876. Unto him and his wife 
were born four children : John, Albert, Mary and Charles, all of whom still survive. 

John Feichtner attended the district schools in pursuit of an education and 
when not busy with his text-books assisted his father in the cultivation of the home 
farm, thus early gaining practical knowledge of the best methods of .tiling the soil 
and caring for the crops. For the past four years he has devoted his time and en- 



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166 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ergies to the cultivation of his farm of sixty-nine acres in Fairfield township, front 
which he annually derives a good income, the well tilled fields responding to his 
care and labor in golden harvests. 

In 1905 was celebrated the marriage *of Mr. Feichtner and Miss Blanche New- 
man, whose birth occurred in New Haven township, this county, in 1885. By this 
union there are two children, Ray and Dale. The parents are well known through- 
out the community in which they have always resided and are young people of the 
highest respectability, whose good qualities of heart and mind have won for them 
the confidence and friendly regard of all with whom they have come in contact. 



BENJAMIN BOWERSOX. 

Benjamin Bowersox, who is actively and successfully engaged in the cultiva- 
tion of his farm of thirty-eight acres in Fairfield township, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania on the 4th of July, 1842, his pstrents being Jacob and Sophia (Walter) Bow- 
ersox, who spent their entire lives in the Keystone state. Benjamin Bowersox, 
who has devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits throughout 
his entire business career, came to Ohio in the year 1861. He now owns a well im- 
proved and productive farm oi thirty-eight acres in Fairfield township and an- 
nually harvests good crops which return to him a gratifying income. 

In 1865 Mr. Bowersox was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Walter, a 
native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of George and Kate (Weaver) Walter, who 
were likewise born in that state. Unto our subject and his wife have been born 
seven children, namely: Mahala, Delia, Alice, Sophia, Hattie, Mandy and Katy. 
They have also reared an adopted son, Walter Bear. 

Politically Mr. Bowiersox is a stalwart advocate of the republican party and is 
now capably discharging the duties devolving upon him in the position of town- 
ship supervisor. As he has lived fcr many years in Huron county, he has a wide 
acquaintance here and his friends know him as an enterprising agriculturist and a 
man of genuine worth. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PALM. 

General agricultural pursuits command the attention of Benjamin Franklin 
Palm, who owns and cultivates a farm of seventy-five acres in Fairfield township. 
He was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, on the 8th of October, 1854, his pa- 
rents being David Logan and Ann (Delancy) Palm, the former a native of Juniata 
county and the latter of Perry county, Pennsylvania. The paternal grandparents, 
Benjamin and Betsy (Nicholson) Palm, were of German descent. George and 
Hannah (Rice) Delancy, the maternal grandparents of our subject, were natives 
of Perry county, Pennsylvania. L^nto David L. and Ann (Delancy) Palm were 
bom the following children : George, Benjamin Franklin, Tames, Elmer, Mary, 
Rebecca, Clara, Sadie and Joanna. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 167 

Benjamin Franklin Palm acquired his education in the schools of his native 
county and there continued to make his home until the year 1881, when he came to 
Huron county, Ohio, taking up his abode in Greenwich township. Subsequently 
he resided in Ripley township for a time and then came to Fairfield township, where 
he has since remained. During the first year of his residence in this county he fol- 
lowed the carpenter's trade but has since given his attention to general farming, in 
which line of activity he has won a creditable measure of prosperity. He pur- 
chased his present farm of seventy-five acres in October, 1899, and has brought the 
fields under a high state of cultivation and improvement. 

On the 30th of October, 1879, Mr. Palm was united in marriage to Miss Mag- 
gie A. Noss, whose birth occurred on the 13th of December, 1856, her parents be- 
ing John G. and Maggie (Millikin) Noss, natives of Pennsylvania. Her paternal 
grandparents were Jacob and Sarah Jane Noss, while the maternal grandparents 
were William and Nancy (Beal) Millikin. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Palm have been 
born two children. Mary Bertha, whose birth occurred in 1880, is the wife of 
George Parrott, of Fairfield township. Ira Grover, who was born on the 2d of 
February, 1883, learned the upholstering trade in early manhood but now devotes 
his time and energies to agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Palm are devoted 
and consistent members of the Methodist church at North Fairfield and have gained 
an extensive circle of friends throughout the county in which they have now re- 
sided for almost three decades. 



E. A. SUTTON. 



E. A. Sutton, cashier of the Home Savings & Banking Company at Chicago 
Junction, was born in Greenwich township, Huron county, April 2, 1872. He is a 
son of Charles A. Sutton, who was born in the same township, July 4, 1844, and is 
still living on the farm where his birth occurred, being one of the representatives 
and respected agriculturists of the community. The grandparents were Aranson 
and Emeline (Brady) Sutton. The former was born April 1, 1802, and with two 
companions — his twin brother Alanson and James Carver — he made his way west- 
ward from New York state to Ohio about 1824. They spent the first night in 
Greenwich township, Huron county, with the family of Willis Smith, who then 
lived about a mile east of the village of Greenwich. The three young men took up 
a tract of land in Ruggles township, now included within Ashland county, and be- 
gan clearing the place. Throughout his remaining days the grandfather carried on 
general farming in this county. 

His son, Charles A. Sutton, was reared to general agricultural pursuits and de- 
termined to engage in farming as a life work. He still resides upon the old home- 
stead and the splendid appearance of the fields indicates his careful supervision and 
his progressive methods. Although he is not a politician in the sense of office seek r 
ing, he has been given several local positions, the duties of which he has discharged 
with promptness and fidelity. In early manhood he wedded Annie E. Ellis, also a 
native of Greenwich township, Huron county, the Ellis family being numbered 
among the respected and prominent old families of that section. 



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168 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for 
E. A. Sutton in his boyhood and youth. He worked in the fields during the sum- 
mer months and in the winter seasons attended school. He continued his educa- 
tion in the Greenwich high school and a!so in Oberlin University and throughout 
his business career he has been identified with banking. He was first associated 
with the Oberlin Banking Company, there remaining for a year and a half, when 
he removed to Berlin Heights and became assistant cashier for the Berlin 
Heights Banking Company, filling that position for eight years or until 
December, 1899. He then came to Chicago Junction and was one of the 
organizers of the Home Savings & Banking Company. He was also elected 
a director and cashier, which office he still fills, and has thus been active in execu- 
tive control of the institution, which has come to be regarded as one of the safe and 
reliable moneyed enterprises of the county. Mr. Sutton is conservative in his busi- 
ness methods and widely recognized as an able and popular official, serving well 
the patrons of the bank, while at all times he is uniform in his courtesy and pleasant 
in manner. Por the past sixteen years he has represented the Equitable Life As- 
surance Society of the United States in New York city, which is one of the largest 
financial institutions of the world. Mr. Sutton has upwards of one million dollars 
in force, which is an indication of his success for this company. 

In November, 1896, Mr. Sutton was married to Miss Elizabeth Romell, a na- 
tive of Berlin Heights, Ohio, and they now have two children, Howard Ellis and 
Harry Romell. The parents are well known socially in Chicago Junction and have 
a circle of friends here almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 
Mr. Sutton is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity and is prominent in 
Masonry, having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is a 
member of Golden Rule Lodge, No. 562, A. F. & A. M. ; Golden Rule Chapter. 
No. 167, R. A. M. ; and Toledo Consistory. He is an exemplary representative of 
the craft, is a public-spirited citizen and a most reliable business man. 



EDWIN C. WOODWORTH. 

Edwin C. Woodworth, who owns and operates a well improved farm of one 
hundred and sixteen acres in Fairfield township, is numbered among the pro- 
gressive and representative agriculturists of the community. His birth oc- 
curred in North Fairfield, Huron county, Ohio, on the 19th of May, 1858. His 
paternal grandfather, Jonathan Woodworth, was one of the early pioneer set- 
tlers of this county, taking up his abode within its borders in 1834. He entered 
a tract of timber land in New Haven township and, being a man of untiring per- 
severance and resolute spirit, gradually transformed it into a rich and produc- 
tive farming property. It has since been known as the Woodworth homestead 
and comprises ninety-three acres of valuable land. 

Herman Woodworth, the father of our subject, was born in Trumansburg, 
Tompkins county, New York, on the 18th of April, 1830, and was but four years 
of age when brought by his parents to this state. In early life he learned the 
trade of a blacksmith, with which line of activity he was successfully identified 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 171 

until 1907, when he was obliged to abandon his work because of failing eyesight. 
The period of his residence in this county now covers three-fourths of a cen- 
tury and he is therefore largely familiar with its annals from a pioneer epoch 
down to the present time. He is a most highly respected and esteemed citizen 
of his community, his upright and honorable life having won him the regard 
and friendship of all with whom he has been associated. 

Edwin C. Woodworth obtained his preliminary education at Fairfield and 
afterward entered the university at Berea, Ohio, but was obliged to return home 
before completing the course. For several years he was identified with educa- 
tional interests as a school teacher but in 1882 purchased the farm of one hun- 
dred and sixteen acres in Fairfield township on which he now resides. He has 
won a gratifying and well merited measure of prosperity as a tiller of the soil, 
for the methods which he follows are practical and at the same time are in 
keeping with ideas of progressive agriculture. 

On the 21st of March, 1882, Mr. Woodworth was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie L. Sillman, who was born in Ripley township, Huron county, on the 29th 
of August, 1861, a daughter of Solomon Sillman. Unto them have been born 
eight children, namely: Iva B., Grace L., Ross S., Myrtle L., Adin M., George 
B., H. Corlette and Alton E. The children have been educated at the district 
and Union schools and the eldest daughter completed her studies in Tiffin. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Woodworth has 
given his political allegiance to the men and measures of the republican party, 
being convinced that its principles are most conducive to good government. In 
religious faith his wife is a Methodist, while fraternally he is identified with 
Fairfield Lodge, No. 261, F. & A. M. Both have an extensive circle of warm 
friends throughout the county in which they have spent their entire lives and 
well merit the regard and esteem which is uniformly accorded them. 



CORNELIUS W. ANDERSON. 

Cornelius W. Anderson, one of the most prominent and respected citizens of 
Norwalk, has served as vice-president of the Citizens Banking Company since its 
organization. He is a native of Hackensack, New Jersey, his birth having there 
occurred on the 1st of September, 1869. His maternal grandfather, Cornelius 
Wortendyke, was the originator and founder of the Knickerbocker Ice Company 
of New York city and became a heavy stockholder in the concern. James Ander- 
son, the father of our subject, did active duty in the Civil war as quartermaster 
sergeant of the Forty-seventh Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry, being 
honorably discharged at the end of his three years* term of enlistment. His name 
is inscribed on the soldiers' monument at Hackensack, New Jersey. He was for 
many years engaged in the general commission business as a member of the firm 
of W. H. B. Totten & Company, of New York city. 

Cornelius W. Anderson received his preliminary education in the schools of 
Norwalk, coming here when a lad of ten years. Here he has since made his home, 
being widely recognized as a most substantial, enterprising and progressive citizen 



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172 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

of the community. Throughout his entire business career he has been engaged 
in the buying and selling of real estate, improving the property before disposing 
of it. He was likewise one of the organizers of the Citizens Banking Company of 
Norwalk and has acted as vice-president thereof from the beginning. The institu- 
tion opened its doors for business on the 12th of June, 1902, and paid a dividend 
of four per cent the first year, setting aside two thousand dollars. The company 
has since paid an annual dividend of eight per cent and now has a surplus of 
thirty thousand dollars. Mr. Anderson has always been one of the bank's heav- 
iest stockholders, while his keen discrimination, sound judgment and excellent 
executive ability have constituted important elements in its successful conduct. 
His home place comprises fifty acres within the city limits of Norwalk and the 
fine buildings thereon are thoroughly equipped with all modern improvements. 
The spacious residence is surrounded by an immense, well kept lawn, while a beau- 
tiful flower garden also greatly enhances the attractiveness of the place. Mr. An- 
derson is likewise the owner of a farm of one hundred and ten acres within a 
mile of Norwalk and at one time was quite an extensive breeder of high grade 
trotting horses, owning one with a mark of 2. 11 %. 

In 1893 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Anderson and Miss Katherine 
Lawrence, who was born in Norwalk, Ohio, on the 14th of December, 1872, a 
daughter of J. P. Lawrence. By this union there are two children : Lawrence W.,- 
whose birth occurred July 31, 1897; and Margaret, whose natal day was Septem- 
ber 4, 1900. 

Mr. Anderson is a stalwart adherent of the republican party and when a young 
man of thirty-four years was elected to the office of mayor of Norwalk, capably 
and satisfactorily discharging the important duties devolving upon him in that 
connection for a period of four years and eight months. He was the youngest man 
who had ever been at the head of municipal affairs in Norwalk and previous to his 
accession to the mayoralty had served for several years as a member of the coun- 
cil. In November, 1909, he was elected a member of the board of education. 
His religious faith is indicated by his attendance at the Episcopal church. In 
whatever relation of life we find him — in political circles, in business or jn social 
relations — he is always the same honorable and honored gentleman, whose worth 
well merits the high regard which is uniformly given him. 



LYMAN ASHLEY. 



Lyman Ashley, a resident of Chicago, Ohio, who is now living retired from the- 
labors of the farm, is still the owner of valuable farming property, having one 
hundred and eight acres of land in Greenfield township. He belongs to the native 
sons of Huron county, having been born here, February 20, 1832, and during a 
long and useful life has borne his part in the upbuilding of his locality. He is a 
son of Dennis and Lurany (Bliss) Ashley, and grandson of Luther and Eunice 
Ashley, and Jacob and Bertha (Brown) Bliss. These grandparents were all na- 
tives of Massachusetts. Dennis Ashley was a farmer all his life, and at the time 
of his death owned sixty-six acres of land in Greenfield township. Lyman Ashley 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 173 

was the eldest of the children born to him and his wife, the others being : Luther, 
who lives in California; Lucy and Norah, both of whom are deceased; E. S. ; 
Mary, the deceased wife of Charles McMasters ; Deptor and Ward, also deceased ; 
and Charlotte, who married J. A. Wheeler and lives in Huron county. Luther 
and E. S. served in the Civil war. 

Lyman Ashley attended the district schools until he was sixteen, at which time 
he was forced to leave school and go to work in the mills, learning to be a sta- 
tionary engineer, which occupation he followed for twelve years. Then, in 1853, 
he went to Iowa, where he purchased eighty acres of government land for one 
hundred dollars, and during the two years he owned it, the property increased 
so- in value that he sold it for eleven hundred and seventy-five dollars. Following 
this sale he returned to Huron county, which has been his home ever since. The 
farm he owns in Greenfield township has been in his possession since 1856 and 
for thirty-eight years, he successfully operated it. 

On March 29, 1863. Mr. Ashley married Mary L. Young, who was a daughter 
of the late James and Sarah (Frost) Young, farmers of Huron county. Mrs. 
Ashley is the older of the two children born to her parents, her brother being 
Curtis Young, who resides in Miami, Florida. Mr. and Mrs. Ashley are the par- 
ents of the following named children: Cora B., who married James Baker, of 
North Fairfield, and has two children Glen and Nina; Joseph B., who married 
Lucy Reed and has five children, Eunice, Leo, Lois, Carl and Ralph ; and Lewis 
C, who married Hattie M. Lindley and has two children: Helen M. and Mary 
Louisa. 

Mr. Ashley has served very acceptably as township trustee, school director 
and road supervisor, and upon six separate occasions has served as juryman at 
Norwalk. While a republican in national matters, having cast his first presidential 
vote for Abraham Lincoln, in local affairs, he uses discrimination, preferring to 
select the man he deems best fitted for the office, rather than confine himself 
strictly to party lines. Neither he nor any member of his family are connected 
with a church organization. They are possessed of many good qualities which 
have won for them the friendship of the people whose opinion counts, and while 
enjoying the comforts of life their hard work has gained them, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ashley are tenderly remembered by their old friends in Greenfield township, where 
they lived for so many years. 



GEORGE S. CATLIN. 



After an experience of almost four decades as a successful teacher and school 
superintendent George S. Catlin has returned to agricultural pursuits, to which he 
was reared and on the land he owns in Boughtonville, Ripley township, devotes 
himself to farming and the breeding of brown Leghorn chickens. He was born 
in Huron county, July 21, 1857, and is a son of Hudson and Theresa (Scobey) 
Catlin. Of remotely Irish ancestry on both his father's and mother's side, Mr. 
Catlin is the scion of families which have from the earliest years of the nation 
participated in its struggles and history. The Scobeys date back to colonial days, 



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174 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

when some of that name were familiar with the Indian wars that involved two 
European powers in mortal conflict. Theresa Scobey, who became the wife of 
Hudson Catlin and the mother of George S. Catlin, was born in 1835, in Schuy- 
ler county, New York. Her father, Archibald Scobey, who was the son of James 
Scobey, was born on Long Island in 1800. In his young manhood, he married 
Miss Sarah Ann Van Valor, a native of Buffalo, New York, and ten years his 
junior. Of this union, there were born eight children: Andrew, Augustus, Cath- 
erine, Jane, Cornelia, Isabel, Margaret and Sarah Ann. 

Hudson Catlin, the father of George S. Catlin, comes from a family that was 
identified with the history of the country on this side of the Alleghenies in the 
early decades of the last century. He was a son of Burge Catlin, a native of 
Medina county, Ohio, who entered upon this life in the year 1812. By his wife, 
who in her maidenhood was Miss Eliza Reed (Burge) Catlin, became the father 
of nine children: Mason, Victor, Allen, Seymour, Cynthia, Anna, Lorene, EJiza 
and Celia. Hudson Catlin grew to manhood in this state and after the inaugura- 
tion of the Civil war, responded to the nation's call for troops, enlisting in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Although his period 
of services comprised only two years and nine months it was crowded with 
memorable experiences and numerous engagements. The latter included about 
twenty battles, while the forty days spent in Libby prison made pictures upon his 
mind which years did not efface. To Hudson Catlin and wife were born seven 
children: George, Archibald, Burge, Wayne, Maud, Cora and Mae. 

George S. Catlin began his school life in Shiloh, and after completing the pre- 
scribed course of study there went to the Mansfield Normal School for further 
training in the profession which was for many years to be his vocation. Though 
not a man in years when he undertook to teach his first class, he possessed that 
insight in human nature and the ability to impart knowledge which is considered 
the peculiar property of older and more experienced men and from the first was 
successful in his direction of a school and his control of its pupils. For twenty- 
five years, in common and graded institutions of popular instruction, Mr. Catlin 
taught the elementary branches of English education and then, having proved his 
efficiency as a teacher, he was made a superintendent of schools, in this capacity 
serving in different cities through a period of eleven years. But the responsibili- 
ties were heavy and exhausting, and when an opportunity presented itself, Mr. 
Catlin retired from his profession and sought rest and recreation on his farm. 
Always a chicken fancier, he has turned to the breeding of fine brown Leghorns, 
contemplating engaging in the poultry and tgg business on a large scale in the 
near future. 

On the 3d of June, 1882, Mr. Catlin was married to Miss Lovina Truxell. 
She was born on the farm on which her husband now lives, August 27, 1865, 
and is a daughter of David and Sarah (Howard) Truxell, both natives of 
Huron county, for Milan, Ohio, was, at the time of the father's birth in 1819, 
included within the boundaries of this county. Mrs. Truxell was born in Green- 
field township in 1839. David Truxell was of remotely German descent, his 
grandfather, Christopher Truxell, having been of German birth, although he 
came to this country, where he died only five months before he reached the hun- 
dredth milestone on life's journey. His son William, the father of David Trux- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 175 

ell, was born in Pennsylvania about 1792. He married Miss Mary Brubaker, 
who was born in Virginia in the first year of the nineteenth century. She was 
the daughter of Christopher Brubaker, a native of Germany, and by her marriage 
became the mother of eight children: Andrew, Addison, William, James, David, 
Mary Jane, Elizabeth and Maria. When William Truxell came to Ohio he 
stopped first at Florence. From there he and five companions walked to Nor- 
walk, where they assisted in erecting the first two buildings of that city. Thence 
they went to Greenfield township, entirely covered with timber at the time, pur- 
chased their farms, cleared their land and put up rude houses for themselves. 
David Truxell, too, experienced the hardships of pioneer days, for he bought 
his farm in 1844 and had to remove the timber before it was habitable. He had 
worked for his father until he was twenty-one, and then, dressed in homespun, set 
out from home literally to cut his own fortune. He began by chopping trees 
for the small sum of four dollars and a half an acre and used the money thus 
gained for the purchase of other clothes. After working for Miner Lawrence 
for about eight years, he was able to buy his farm. Alone and unaided, he cleared 
the fields and built his first home, and now though a man well advanced in years 
is still of strong physique and able to work like many a younger man. The strength 
of his constitution he attributes to the fact that he has never smoked, chewed, nor 
drank and tells with pride that he has never been inside a saloon. He has always 
been a liberal supporter of the churches, has been a professed member since he was 
eighteen, and in politics is a republican. His first presidential vote was cast for 
William Henry Harrison, the whig candidate, and when he marked his ballot in 
the fall of 1908, he had signified his choice of a national executive for the eight- 
eenth time. To Mr. Truxell and wife have been born five children: Lafayette; 
Nettie ; Lovina ; one who died in infancy ; and Perry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Catlin's family consists of three children : Lela, the eldest, who 
was born January 5, 1884, married W. J. Wilkinson, the North Fairfield agent for 
the S. N. & M. railroad. Millicent, born March 2, 1885, married F. W. Devoe, 
and they have two children : Robb and Donna. Clarke, the youngest, born Octo- 
ber 27, 1887, ls a school teacher. 

Mr. Catlin is a member of the Methodist church and is very prominent as a 
church worker, having been for years the leading spirit in the congregation, a class 
leader and chorister. Politically, he affiliates with thfe republican party, and 
though his own duties have always been heavy, he has found time for the past 
nine years to render his fellow citizens invaluable service as justice of the peace. 
A man of undeniable ability, he is also possessed of indefatigable energy and has 
won the esteem of all who know him. 



HARVEY NEWTON MILLER. 

Harvey Newton Miller a retired farmer of Ripley township, Huron county, 
now living in Plymouth, was born in Cass township, Richland county, August 1, 
1854, and is a son of Jacob and Mary (Noble) Miller. Jacob Miller, a son of 
John Miller, was born in November, 1827, in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. 



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176 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

His parents having died in his infancy, he was taken by his grandparents who 
brought him to Ohio in 1832, when he was less than five years old. In his early 
manhood, he married Miss Mary Noble, who was born in Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1827, and was only two years of age when, in 1829, her parents, Har- 
vey and Maria (Little) Noble, came to Ohio. She was one of a family of six chil- 
dren, John, James, William, Elizabeth and Minerva, being the others. 

Reared on a farm and working in the fields during the summer vacations, it 
was but natural that Harvey Newton Miller should devote himself to agriculture. 
The farm of eighty acres in Ripley township, which he turned over to the care of 
his son in the spring of 1909, was for twenty-two years his home and the scene of 
his daily toil. Nine years ago, he purchased the land, for he felt that it was as rich 
and fertile a tract as could be obtained in that neighborhood, and auo the fact that 
he had worked on it for so many years and knew all the peculiarities of the soil 
urged him to the step. 

On the 1st of August, 1877, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
Bowlby, who was born July 8, 1858, in Ripley township and is a daughter of 
Emanuel and Lucretia (Park) Bowlby. Her parents had five children: David, 
William, Martha, Addie and Ella. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have three children: 
Park, was born September 15, 1883. On the 20th of March, 1906, he married 
Miss Florence Waddington, a daughter of Chory and Elizabeth (Nothacker) 
Waddington. Oliver, was born January 24, 1890, and is now employed in Lof- 
land's grocery at Plymouth. Frey, the eldest son, was born March 11, 1878, and 
died May 26, 1883. 

Mr. Miller and the members of his family belong to the English Lutheran 
church and are regular in attendance on its services, and consistent in their prac- 
tice of its teachings. In politics, he espouses the republican party and invariably 
casts his vote for its candiate. He is not a politician nor an office seeker, however, 
though he has rendered valuable service to his fellow citizens as a member of the 
school board. A man of high principles, whose life has been devoted to con- 
scientious labor, he is well deserving of the rest which he is now enjoying in 
Plymouth. 



• SEBASTIAN SCHNURR. 

Sebastian Schnurr, who throughout his entire life has been numbered among 
the worthy and respected residents of Huron county, is the owner of a fine farm 
of one hundred and seventy acres in Ridgefield township, on which he has now 
made his home for fifty years. He is today one of the oldest native born citizens 
of the county. His birth occurred in Peru township, on the 4th of November, 
1835, his parents being Plasey and Teckla (Barman) Schnurr, both of whom 
were natives of Baden, Germany. In the year 1829 the father crossed the 
Atlantic to the United States, taking up his abode in Peru township, this county, 
where he worked for others for a time and then purchased a farm of thirty acres. 
He was identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his active busi- 
ness career and had attained the age of sixty-five years when he was called to 
his final rest, the community thus losing one of its most esteemed and well 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 179 

known early settlers. His wife was fifty-five years of age when she passed 
away. Unto this worthy couple were born twelve children, six of whom died 
in infancy. The others were as follows : Cornelius and Rosie, who are now de- 
ceased ; Sebastian, of this review ; Philip ; Katie ; and Frances. 

As stated above, Sebastian Schnurr has remained a resident of this county 
throughout his entire life and has always devoted his time and energies to the 
work of general farming. For the past half century he has made his home on 
his present farm of one hundred and seventy acres in Ridgefield township and 
as the years have gone by has won a gratifying measure of prosperity in the 
cultivation of the cereals best adapted to soil and climate. The place is well im- 
proved and in its neat and thrifty appearance indicates the supervision of a prac- 
tical and progressive owner. 

On the 22d of June, 1863, Mr. Schnurr was joined in wedlock to Miss Emma 
Friend, a native of Germany, who in early life was brought to this country by 
her aunt. By this union there are five children, namely : Ida, who is at home ; 
Emile, living in Pern township, who married Miss Amelia Gise and has two 
children, Josie and Paul; Flora, who makes her home in this county and mar- 
ried Jacob Russman, by whom she has ten children ; Bertha, living in Ridgefield 
township, who gave her hand in marriage to John Bachman, by whom she has 
two children, Ciralus and Frances ; and Otto, a resident of Ridgefield township, 
who wedded Miss Mary Dernwald and has two children, Emery and Ellis. 

Mr. Schnurr is a communicant of the Catholic church and his life has been 
honorable and upright, so that in the evening of his days he receives the re- 
spect and veneration which should ever be accorded to one of advanced years. 
He has been an interested witness of the county's growth and development as 
it has emerged from pioneer conditions and taken on all the evidences of our 
modern civilization and well deserves mention in this volume as one of its most 
worthy and well known citizens. 



ALFRED BARNARD. 



Alfred Barnard, carrying on agricultural pursuits in Lyme township, Huron 
county, is the owner of eighty-six acres of land, to the cultivation of which he is 
devoting his time and energies. He was born in Shelburn, Massachusetts, Aug- 
ust 9, 1824, a son of Anson and Lucinda (Nims) Barnard, also natives of that 
place. The father was born February 22, 1792, and the mother March 27, 1795, 
while they both passed away in April, 1859, tne father's demise occurring on the 
nth and the mother's on the 30th of that month. Their marriage was celebrated 
December 2, 1819, and in their family were eight children, namely: Anson A., who 
was born October 14, 1820, and died April n, 1859 ; Frederick A., who was born 
September 8, 1822, and died in 1854 ; Alfred of this review ; Charles, who was born 
August 22, 1829, and died in 1908; Helen A., who was born September n, 1828, 
and passed away December 24, 1861 ; William, born October 12, 1830; Lucinda, 
who was born June 30, 1833, and died January 3, 1864; and Asa W., born Octo- 
ber 21, 1836. 



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180 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Alfred Barnard spent the early years of his life under the parental roof and 
acquired his education in the common schools. He remained at home until twen- 
ty-two years of age, when he came to Huron county, this state, where he re- 
sided with his uncle, Samuel Nims, for about seven years. On March i, 1855, 
he was married to Ruth A. Bemiss, who was born March 10, 1827, and is a daugh- 
ter of Elijah and Sophronia Bemiss, pioneer settlers of this district. After his 
marriage, he removed to the farm which is now his residence and which was 
given to him by his wife's father. When the land came into his possession, it 
was entirely covered with timber and brush, but with characteristic energy and 
industry, he set about its improvement, erecting a house, clearing the land and 
cultivating the soil until, in due course of time, the fields began to yield substan- 
tial harvests in return for his time and labor. Mr. Barnard is practical in his 
methods, studying the best ways of plowing, planting and harvesting, while to- 
day his place is a well improved property, containing all the equipment and ac- 
cessories of a model farm of the twentieth century. 

In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Barnard were six children : Helen, at home, who 
is a graduate of the Painsville College, and has been a district school teacher for 
many years; William E., who married Lillian Haynes, by whom he has two 
children, Rachel and Alfred, and who resides with his father, assisting in the 
operation of the home farm ; Charles, who died at the age of twenty-three years ; 
Mary, who passed away at the age of two years ; Lyman, living at Toledo, Ohio, 
who married Bertha Kessler and has two children, Dorothy and Kenneth; and 
Clara, who married Frank Seymour, a resident of this township, by whom she 
has four children, George B., Ruth H., Ethelyn and Alberta Y. In 1892, the wife 
and mother was called to her final rest, leaving husband and children to mourn 
her loss. She was a lady of excellent traits of character and enjoyed the high 
regard of a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Barnard's political affiliations are in accord with the principles of the re- 
publican party and for six years, he served as trustee of his township. He is a 
prominent member of the Lyme Congregational church, in which he served for 
many years as deacon. Honorable and upright in all his dealings, the salient char- 
acteristics of his life have ever been such as command the respect, confidence and 
good will of his fellowmen. 



JONATHAN S. WHITE. 

Jonathan S. White, one of the most prominent citizens of the progressive vil- 
lage of Greenwich and cashier of the First National Bank there, was born in 
Ripley township, Huron county, Ohio, February 24, 1844, and is a son of John C. 
and Nancy A. (Taylor) White. The latter was born in Pennsylvania, but the 
father's birthplace was Orange county, New York, though he was but fourteen 
years of age when brought by his parents to this state. The family settled in 
Richland county, near Mansfield, and engaged in farming, though the father for 
many years taught in the district schools during the winter. John C. White 
moved to Huron county in 1840 and bought a large tract of land which he set 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 181 

about clearing, a task that was not entirely completed when his son Jonathan 
became old enough to assist him. His wife, who shared with him the toils of those 
early days, bore him four children: Mary E., Jonathan S., Jennie and Margaret 
A., the last named being the only member of the family beside the subject of this 
sketch now surviving. She married Joseph H. Lombard and has now been a 
widow for some years, living in Jamestown, New York. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
John C. White have passed away, the former in August, 1883, the latter eleven 
years later in the month of April, and both are buried in Edwards Grove ceme- 
tery, Ripley township. Mr. White was always a farmer, sincerely interested in 
the public weal, though he was never a participant in the political life of the 
community. He was devoted to his family and in every way a most exemplary 
citizen. 

Jonathan S. White was educated in the district schools, spending his youth 
on the farm and engaging in the general work there under his father's supervision. 
During the Civil war, he served as a private in Company C, One Hundred and 
Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which regiment was assigned to the Army 
of the Potomac, and was chiefly engaged in post duty in and about Washington 
and on the Potomac river. When he was discharged at the close of the war, he 
taught school for a number of winter terms, and in the summer devoted his ener- 
gies to farming. For about one and a half years, he clerked in a general store in 
New London, and then returned to farming in Ripley township. After his mar- 
riage, Mr. White, not only pursued a general line of agriculture, but also en- 
gaged in stock raising and feeding, in both of which he prospered. 

In politics, he is a republican and has ever taken an active and creditable 
part in public matters. For one year, he served as township trustee and then 
was elected town clerk, in which capacity he rendered efficient and faithful serv- 
ice during a period of thirteen years. In 1886, he was nominated and elected audi- 
tor of Huron county and filled the position to the entire satisfaction of his con- 
stituents and with credit to himself for the space of six years. It was during this 
period, that Mr. White moved his family to Norwalk. When he retired from the 
office of auditor, carrying with him the best wishes of the community, he had 
served, he entered the First National Bank of Norwalk as cashier. From Jan- 
uary, 1894, to October, 1902, he filled that position, leaving it to become cashier 
of the First National Bank of Greenwich, in December, 1903, where he has re- 
mained to the present. At that time, he took up his residence in Greenwich and has 
since identified himself with every movement that has had in view the advance- 
ment of the village and the increase of its prosperity. 

On the 25th of February, 1869. was celebrated the marriage of Mr. White 
and Miss Marietta Barre, a daughter of John and Amy (Stout) Barre, of 
Ripley township. The Barres came to Ohio from Niagara county, New York, 
as a newly married couple, and here took up the life of farmers. Fifteen children 
were born to them, all but two being still alive: Cornelia E., deceased; David E. ; 
Herman B., deceased ; Eliza J. ; Jonathan S. ; Theodore W. ; William H. ; Mar- 
rietta E. ; Ira E. ; Lyman S. ; James K. ; Corbis M. ; Dwight M. ; Josephine E. ; 
and Jessie F. The mother of these children died in May 1882. Mr. Barre was 
prospered in his private affairs. When death overtook him, in 1883, ne was 
mourned as a public spirited citizen, whose life's record was one of integrity and 



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182 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

of good works. To Mr. and Mrs. White there have been born three children: 
James E., deceased ; Blanche M., at home ; and John G., who married Myrtle Bev- 
eridge of Greenwich and is now cashier of the Wakeman Bank Company of Wake- 
man, Ohio. He is an alert, efficient and popular young business man, that gives 
promise of a successful career. 

Mr. White is, and has been for many years, a stanch Mason, belonging to 
Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, and to the Chapter at Norwalk. In religious mat- 
ters, he and his family give their support to the Congregational church, of which 
Mr. White is trustee, and in whose Sunday school he has been superintendent, and 
otherwise prominent in all that concerns the work of the church. Mrs. White 
and her daughter, Blanche M., are well known for the conspicuous part they play 
in the social and literary life of the village. In short, they are active coadjutors 
to Mr. White in maintaining his reputation as the best citizen, in point of effi- 
cient activity, toward bettering the conditions of the village. His influence is 
always thrown on the side of progress, for the improvement of the educational 
opportunities here, better streets and roads, and better government. 



ALBERT L. GINSTE. 



Albert L. Ginste owns a well improved and valuable farm of eighty acres in 
Wakeman township which annually pays tribute to his care and labor in bounteous 
harvests. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Huron county, his 
birth having occurred in Wakeman township on the 26th of July, 1879. ^ e was a 
son of John and Wilhelmina (Burke) Ginste, who in early manhood and woman- 
hood sailed from Germany to the United States with their respective parents and 
settled near Henrietta, Lorain county, Ohio. At the time of the Civil war John 
Ginste, the father of our subject, enlisted in defense of the Union, becoming a 
member of Company H, Forty-third Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with 
which he served for more than three years. After the close of the war he became 
an active member of Harrison Douglass Post, G. A. R., at Kipton, Lorain county, 
Ohio, acted as its commander for a number of years and always bore a helpful part 
in Grand Army matters, being deeply interested in the welfare of the "boys in 
blue." 

At his death the following resolutions were adopted by this post : 
"We pause, we falter at this portal of fate where the gates stand forever ajar. 
At this open grave of a comrade we tarry to review the grand record of a glorious 
life. The meteor has traversed the arc of trajection but the sheen of its glory il- 
lumines the sky with its splendor, and that sheen will fade only as the memory 
of man will fade. We are standing at the bier of John Ginste, a man who was 
of high moral worth and unfaltering integrity. He was the embodiment of all that 
was true and noble in man. In his death we recognize that a brilliant star has been 
erased from the earth's galaxy of noble manhood. When in the full rigor of man- 
hood, at the call of duty he enlisted in Company H, Forty-third Regiment of Ohio 
Infantry at Oberlin, October 15, 1861. On account of his superior qualities and 
proficiency he was early promoted through the various noncommissioned grades 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 183 

to that of first sergeant of his company. On October 28, 1863, he was commis- 
sioned by the governor as a second lieutenant. During 1861-62 and 63 he served 
in the army of the Mississippi and the army of the Tennessee, in the states of Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee and Mississippi. In 1864 he served in the Sixteenth Army Corps 
until that organization ceased to exist. The command to which he belonged was 
transferred to the Seventeenth Army Corps. He rendered honorable service on 
Sherman's bloody trail down through Georgia, where the crash of infantry firing 
and the thunder of artillery never ceased neither day or night from the morning 
of the 4th day of May to the night of the 5th day of September, 1864. He was with 
Sherman's retrograde march from Atlanta to Northern Alabama against the Con- 
federate army of General Hood. He was mustered out at Savannah, Georgia, De- 
cember 22, 1864, having served two months and eight days beyond a three year en- 
listment. During his services he traversed the entire Confederacy from the west 
to east. His military service is a grand record of patriotic manhood ; he has to his 
credit a grand array of brilliant stars which adorn the nation's baldrick of glory. 
He was engaged with his command at Cripple Creek ; Resaca ; New Madrid ; sec- 
ond battle of Corinth; Rome; Island No. 10; Oxford; Adairsville; Tiptonville; 
Decatur, Alabama ; Dallas ; Fort Pillow ; Snake Creek Gap ; Big Shanty ; first bat- 
tle of Corinth; Nickajack; Kennesaw ; Iuka; Decatur, Georgia; Atlanta; Ezra 
Church; Jonesboro; Love joy Station; and Savannah. 

After leaving the army John Ginste turned his attention to general agricul- 
tural pursuits, successfully carrying on farming in Wakeman township, Huron 
county, until 1882, when he took up his abode in Lorain county and there made his 
home until called to his final rest. His political allegiance was given to the re- 
publican party and he never failed to cast his ballot in support of its men and meas- 
ures on election day. For some years he served as a trustee of Camden township, 
Lorain county, capably discharging the duties devolving upon him in this connec- 
tion. Interested and active in matters of public moment, his aid and cooperation 
could always be counted upon to further any movement instituted to promote the 
general welfare. He kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day and 
was always able to support his position by intelligent argument. He was highly re- 
spected and honored throughout the community in which he made his home and his 
death, which occurred in Elyria, Lorain county, in the fall of 1906, was the occa- 
sion of deep and widespread regret. His wife had passed away in October, 1904. 

They reared a family of seven children, namely: Ida, now the wife of Alfred 
Squires, of Eaton township, Lorain county ; John, a resident of Cleveland ; Cath- 
erine, who is deceased ; Albert L., of this review ; Mary, who has also passed away ; 
Charles, of Wakeman ; and Minnie, the wife of Meade Buckley, of Camden town- 
ship. John Ginste had a full realization of the value of good mental training as a 
preparation for life's practical and responsible duties and provided his children 
with all the educational advantages which his means would permit. 

Albert L. Ginste obtained his education in the public schools of Lorain county 
and grew to manhood on his father's farm, in the work of which he assisted when 
his time was not occupied with his text-books. Subsequent to his marriage he 
took up his abode on his present farm of eighty acres in Wakeman township and 
has since devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits. His property is 
the visible evidence of his life of well directed thrift and industry, for he started 



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^84 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

out on his own account empty handed and has steadily worked his way upward 
until he is now the owner of a valuable and productive farm. The buildings on 
the place are all of a substantial and modern character. During the winter seasons 
Mr. Ginste engages in the feeding of sheep and in all of his undertakings is meet- 
ing with that measure of success which always rewards earnest, persistent and un- 
tiring labor. 

On the 2d of December, 1807, Mr. Ginste was united in marriage to Miss Cor- 
delia Barnes, a daughter of Charles and Helen (Hall) Barnes. The Halls were 
a prominent pioneer family of Wakeman township, contributing in substantial 
measure to its early development and upbuilding. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ginste has 
been born a daughter, Helen. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Ginste has given his 
political allegiance to the republican party and for three years has filled the office 
of assessor in Wakeman township. At the present time he is acting as a mem- 
ber of the township board of education, doing effective service for the cause of 
public instruction. All matters pertaining to the advancement of the community 
along material, intellectual and moral lines receive his hearty support and coop- 
eration and he is widely recognized as a most progressive and public-spirited citi- 
zen. For about twelve years he has been a member of Wakeman Tent, No. 92, 
K. O. T. M., of which he has served as commander and also as lieutenant com- 
mander. Both he and his wife are prominent and valued members of the Congre- 
gational church, taking a deep and helpful interest in both church and Sunday- 
school work. He is a member of the board of trustees and his wife was organist 
in the church for a number of years. The young couple hold a high place in public 
esteem and their own hospitable and attractive home is a favorite resort with their 
many friends. 



CHARLES S. CLARK. 



Charles S. Clark needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for he 
has gained a world-wide reputation as the most extensive producer and propaga- 
tor of seed corn rot cnly in this country but in foreign countries as well. He 
was born March 22, i860, in a house which stood upon the site of his present 
residence, his parents being David S. and Esther (Boyd) Cterk. The father, 
who followed farming throughout his active life, passed away on the 7th of 
February, 1885. In the frmily were three sons and two dmghters: Ella, Walter 
and Rollie B., all now r deceased; Charles S. ; end Hattie, the wife of Professor 
W. Andrews of Oberlin College. The father was a man of strong character, 
prominent in public affairs and given to good works, and he lived and died with 
the full confidence ?.nd respect of all who knew him. His widow still survives 
at the age of seventy-sevL-n years and enjoys remarkable health. 

Charles S. Clark spent his youth on the home farm and was educated in the 
public schools of Wakeman. At the age of eighteen years he began raising seed 
corn on one acre of ground, cultivating two varieties of select corn. Some- 
thing of the growth and extent of his business is indicated in the fret that on the 



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CHARLES S. CLARK 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 187 

1st of May, 1909, he shipped ninety-four varieties of seed corn to one man in 
Rockford, Illinois. His success has been phenomenal in this line of business and 
for the past twenty years he has been the largest grower of seed corn in the 
world, shipping to every corn-growing country on the face of the globe. During 
the winter of 1908-9 three shipments were sent to Paris and beginning in the 
month of October, 1909, his shipments averaged one thousand bushels per day 
during the entire season up to the middle of May. Among other very large con- 
tracts made for next winter's delivery he has one for a carload to be sent to 
San Francisco, California, and a full carload to Knowlton, Quebec, Canada. His 
business has developed from the small beginning of one acre, which was taken 
up as an experimental work, the excellence of his product being his best adver- 
tisement. He has been the originator and introducer of a great many of the 
different varieties of field corn and sweet corn now in use, including the finest 
varieties which are in cultivation today. There is a large amount of seed corn 
and many varieties raised by the farmers of Huron, Erie and Sandusky counties, 
from seed furnished by Mr. Clark and under contract with him for the purchase 
of their crop. He applies the same business rules to other sections which are 
well adapted for the development of seed corn. In addition to the enormous 
trade which he has built up in this connection he is also extensively engaged 
in the production of seed oats, of which he ships large quantities. These are 
also produced in many varieties and go into every oat-growing district. Mr. 
Clark has a fine farm of his own on which he produces a great deal of seed 
corn and oats, especially in an experimental way in the development of new 
varieties. His home is a commodious and attractive residence and altogether is 
a model farm in the nature of its improvements and the care which is bestowed 
upon it. 

On the 12th of June, 1888, Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
T. Smith, of Milford, Connecticut, a daughter of E. Stiles and Maria Theresa 
(Platte) Smith, who had one son and two daughters: Frank W., Sarah T. and 
Susan Isabelle. The last named is now Mrs. Elbert N. Clark. The son married 
Miss Carrie W. Beard, of New Haven, Connecticut. The Smith family, to 
which Mrs. Clark belongs, never became residents of Ohio but were prom- 
inent in their locality, the ancestry extending back to twelve generations since 
the first of the name came to America from England. Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
have three children : Hazel Theresa, Hattie Marie, and Charles Harold Stiles. 

They are refined and highly intelligent people and their home bears every 
evidence of these characteristics. They expect to give to their children every ad- 
vantage in educational lines, intending to send all to college. Mrs. Clark is 
devoted to her home and gives to it her best efforts but also finds time for diver- 
sion and development in club work. The family are members of the Congrega- 
tional church and active in church and Sunday-school work. Mr. Clark has 
done much valuable public service aside from what he has accomplished in a busi- 
ness way. He was a member and president of the board of education for six years, 
has been vice-president of the Wakeman Banking Company for ten years and is 
now a member of the township board of trustees. He is independent in politics, 
giving his support to the men and measures that his judgment endorses. As a 
young man he was much interested in baseball and won considerable note as a 



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188 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

member of the famous Wakeman Club. He still retains a keen interest in the 
national game but finds his special diversion in a summer outing with his family 
enjoyed at their handsome summer cottage at Ruggles Beach on the shores of 
Lake Erie. 



FRED BROWN. 



Among the native sons of Sherman township, Huron county, who are en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and are ranked among the progressive and repre- 
sentative farmers of the community, is Fred Brown, who owns and operates a 
farm of one hundred and thirty-seven acres in this township. He was born on the 
ioth of November, 1855, and is a son of Fred and Margaret (Pirrung) Brown, 
both natives of Germany. They came to America about 1841 or 1842 and set- 
tled in Columbus, Ohio, where they remained for two years, after which they 
came to Sherman township, Huron county. While in Germany, the father was a 
wagonmaker by occupation and followed that trade during his residence in Col- 
umbus, but after his arrival in Sherman township, he devoted himself to farm- 
ing. He purchased one hundred acres of land but later sold a part of it, owning 
at the time of his death eighty-eight acres. He and his wife were both buried 
in Sherman township. In their family were the following children : Jacob ; Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Charles Westrick, of Norwalk; Peter, who lives in Michigan; 
Margaret, the wife of Sebastian Purcell, residing in Peru township ; John, who 
lives in Michigan; Frank, also of that state; Fred, of this review; Anna, the de- 
ceased wife of Henry Schendorf ; and Anthony, who resides on and operates the 
old homestead in Sherman township. Of this family the three eldest were born 
in Germany. 

Reared amid the scenes and environment of rural life, Fred Brown attended 
the district schools of his native township in the acquirement of an education. At 
the age of sixteen, he put aside his textbooks and engaged in farming for his 
father until twenty-seven years of age, when he started out for himself, rent- 
ing a farm for four years. At the expiration of that period, he removed to In- 
diana, where he purchased a farm of ninety-five acres in Pulaski county and 
continued to make that his residence for thirteen years. He then sold his farm 
in Indiana and returned to Sherman township in 1900, buying his present place 
from George Diehr. He is now engaged in general farming and through his in- 
dustry, well directed labors and careful management, is meeting with a creditable 
measure of success. 

On the 14th of February, 1882, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Ot- 
tilia Geiger, a daughter of Rudolph and Ernestina (Ott) Geiger, both natives of 
Germany. They were farming people and both passed away in Sandusky, to which 
place they had removed just prior to their demise. In their family were the 
following children : Louisa, the deceased wife of John Smith ; John ; Adolph ; Mrs. 
Fred Brown ; Mary, the wife of John Weidinger ; and Anna, who wedded Joseph 
Ringlein. Mr. and Mrs. Brown became the parents of five children, as follows : 
William A., born June 1, 1883; A,bin p -» b° m Ma y 2 4, 1888; Frank M., bom 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 189 

July 25, 1890; Fred R., born August 16, 1893; ^ Ernestina M., bom December 
6, 1896. 

The family are members of the Catholic church at Bismarck, Sherman town- 
ship, and are held in high esteem throughout the community. Mr. Brown gives 
substantial support to the democratic party and is serving at present as township 
trustee. He has also been constable, road supervisor and school director, and is a 
loyal citizen, supporting every measure calculated to benefit the community in 
its rapid and substantial development. 



ALFRED W. PEIRCE. 



For half a century Alfred W. Peirce has lived in Huron county and needs no 
introduction to the readers of this volume for his creditable life record has made 
him widely and favorably known. In all business affairs, he has been thoroughly 
reliable as well as progressive and in his relations to public interests he has been 
found a man of progressive spirit whose desire for the public welfare has been 
manifest in active work for its behalf. He was born April 29, 1833, * n Charlotte, 
Vermont, a son of Chauncey and Mahala (Conger) Peirce. 

The father was a native of Rhode Island and removed to Vermont, but never 
became a resident of Ohio. The son spent his youth on his father's farm and was 
educated in the district schools, the schoolhouse of the neighborhood being upon 
land in possession of the family. After he had mastered the elementary branches 
of learning, he spent one term in an academy to which he walked a distance of five 
miles each morning, returning in the same way each evening. He would also 
assist with the chores about the farm and though every moment was busily oc- 
cupied and he had to walk so far to school, he never entered the schoolroom too 
late for the opening exercises. At seventeen years of age, he began teaching 
school, following that profession through the winter months while the summer 
seasons were devoted to the work of the fields, his father thus receiving the bene- 
fit of his services until after he had attained his majority. In 1856, when twenty- 
three years of age, he left Vermont and made his way to Chicago. In the mean- 
time, he had picked up a knowledge of the carpenter's trade during his leisure 
hours. His education, too, was largely obtained by studying when the work 
of the farm was over for the day, and in this manner he became a man of broad 
education with wide knowledge concerning literature, mathematics and the 
sciences. On going to Chicago, in 1856, he found employment in the shops of 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway Company. At that time there was 
not a foot of paving in Chicago, which was a city of comparatively small propor- 
tions. Mr. Peirce remained there from March until June, when he was called 
to his home in Vermont by the death of his father. He then continued in the 
Green Mountain state until the spring of 1857, when he made his way to Lake 
City, Minnesota. There he again worked at the carpenter's trade until the 
succeeding fall, when the country became involved in a financial panic render- 
ing it very difficult to secure employment for building operations were practically 
suspended. 



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190 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

About that time Mr. Peirce came to Townsend, Huron county, Ohio, through 
the influence of some acquaintances he had made during his residence in Min- 
nesota. He and his brother-in-law, M. M. Perkins, who came with him, purchased 
a hotel in Townsend and in addition to conducting the hostelry Mr. Peirce also 
worked in the agricultural implement factory owned by the firm of Hyde & 
Allen, the partners being W. S. Hyde and Pruden Allen. Mr. Peirce was em- 
ployed in the shops until the spring of 1858, when the company suspended be- 
cause of the stringency of the times. He then turned his attention to contracting 
and building and became a large operator along this line, erecting many of the 
schoolhouses of the county and many of the best dwellings. He was thus con- 
nected with building operations in addition to conducting his small farm until 
1869, when he became associated with a company of railroad bridge contractors 
and was in Des Moines, Iowa, for a period. 

On his return to Huron county, Ohio, he located in Townsend and accepted 
the superintendency of a sash and door factory. Three years later, he became 
engaged in the black walnut business in Indiana. When he again returned to 
Townsend, he built a residence for himself and this was about the last of his 
building operations. In 1875, he engaged with the Collins Pump Company as 
bookkeeper and thus represented them for two years, after which he became in- 
terested in the business of manufacturing pumps and also in the operation of a 
sawmill, in company with John C. Shaw. In this, he continued until 1890, wlhen 
the mill and factory were destroyed by a cyclone, terminating his business inter- 
ests of that character. He next purchased the Union Bending Works, at Col- 
lins, and has since operated this plant in connection with his son, Frank Peirce. 
He has ever been a man of resolute purpose, carrying forward to successful 
completion whatever he has undertaken unless his path was barred by some obsta- 
cle or difficulty that could not be overcome by persistent and honorable effort. 
In 1884, he established a mercantile enterprise in Collins which he has since con- 
ducted in connection with other business affairs. He has ever been watchful of 
opportunities and his utilization of the advantages which have come to him have 
brought him to a prominent position in the business circles of the community. 

Mr. Peirce has been married three times. On the 22A of August, 1854, he 
wedded Miss Lutheria M. Brown, a daughter of Smyrna and Almeda (Morse) 
Brown. Mrs. Peirce was of the same township in Vermont in which her husband's 
birth occurred. There were two children of this union : Lynda and Charles The 
daughter is now the wife of the Rev. William Fisher, Congregational minis- 
ter of Kansas, while the son, Charles, is a successful farmer in Hartman town- 
ship. The wife and mother died November 24, 1864, and on the 9th of Decem- 
ber, 1869, Mr. Peirce wedded Miss Julia A. Dean, a daughter of Royal C. and 
Mary (Smith) Dean. The father was a traveling saleman for a Zanesville (Ohio) 
firm for many years and also the owner of a farm in Townsend township. By 
the second marriage there were born three children : Royal C, who was killed at 
Akron, Ohio, while in the line of duty with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company ; 
Carl W., who after graduating from Oberlin College in 1900, went to Pittsburg 
and is now identified with the steel interests of that city ; and Frank H., who was 
formerly an Oberlin student and is now associated in business with his father. 
The death of Mrs. Julia Peirce occurred March 9, 1894, and on the 24th of Octo- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 191 

ber, 1895, Mr. Peirce was joined in wedlock to Miss Lena E. Fitch, a daughter 
of Edgar and Letta (Ward) Fitch, of Townsend township, who came to this 
state from Michigan in 1891. Mr. Fitch is a farmer by occupation and has re- 
turned to Michigan. By the third marriage there is but one child, a daughter, 
Pauline. 

Politically, Mr. Peirce is a republican having been identified with the party for 
years as one of its well informed representatives and active workers thoroughly 
qualified to defend his position by intelligent argument. He has served as jus- 
tice of the peace for one term, was township trustee for several terms, and town- 
ship clerk for several years. He was a member of the school board for many years 
and has always been a friend of education, advocating advanced ideas in con- 
nection with the work of public instruction. To his children, he gave superior col- 
lege advantages and all made excellent records in their studies, especially in mathe- 
matical lines. Mr. Peirce is a member of the Masonic fraternity and for years was 
active in the affairs of the order. He has always been an advocate of temper- 
ance and of things which work for honorable manhood and progressive citizenship. 
His wife and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
active in church and Sunday school work, while Mr. Peirce gives liberally to the 
support thereof. He is in every way a splendid type of citizen and his coopera- 
tion can be counted upon to further any movement for the general good. 



FRANK W. ADELMAN. 

Frank W. Adelman, owning and operating a fine farm of one hundred acres 
of land, situated in Norwalk township, Huron county, Ohio, was born upon this 
farm on the 27th of February, 1861, a son of John J. and Margaret (Klunding) 
Adelman, both natives of Germany. In 1830, the father accompanied his parents, 
J. P. and Tracy Adelman, to the United States, and they located in Buffalo, New 
York, remaining in that city for a short time, after which a removal was made to 
Ohio, the family home being established in Ridgefield township, Huron county. 
There the grandfather of our subject purchased one hundred acres of land and 
in that township, John P. Adelman spent almost his entire life. He bought the 
farm upon which our subject now resides and placed many improvements thereon, 
devoting his energies entirely to agricultural pursuits. He became well known in 
the community in which he resides and served for some time as road supervisor. 
He passed away in 1870 in the faith of the Catholic church. He had married 
Margaret Klunding, who was born in Germany in 183 1 and left the fatherland 
when thirteen years of age, accompanying her parents to the United States, where 
they settled in Sherman township, Huron county, Ohio. Her death occurred on 
the 17th of November, 1898. In the family of this worthy couple, were seven 
children, namely: Francis, deceased; Charles, who has also passed away; Rose, 
the wife of Anthony Harr, residing in Norwalk, Ohio ; Frank W.. of this review ; 
Clara M.. also residing in Norwalk; Joseph, deceased; and Benjamin, of Nor- 
walk. 



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192 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Reared amid the scenes and environments of rural life, Frank W. Adelman 
acquired his education in the district and German schools, while the periods of 
vacation were devoted to the work of the farm. Upon attaining his majority, he 
decided to make the occupation to which he had been reared his life work and he 
has since directed his energies and time to general agricultural pursuits. He has 
always resided upon the farm where he was born and has continued in the work 
of improvement and development until he has brought his fields under a fine state 
of cultivation, the excellent condition of the entire place today attesting the care 
and labor expended upon it. He possesses good business ability and his energy 
and close application to work have been the means of bringing to him the pros- 
perity which he now enjoys. 

On the 9th of October, 1888, Mr. Adelman was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Shaeffer, a daughter of George and Angeline (Dehe) Shaeffer. She was 
born in Peru township, this county, February 26, 1867, an d on the 10th of October, 
1907, was called to her final rest, leaving besides her husband, six children to mourn 
her loss, namely : George, Loretti, Emma, Elmie, Herbert and Clarence, all resid- 
ing at home. 

Mr. Adelman holds membership with the Modern Woodman of Norwalk and 
is also a member of the Catholic church. His long residence in this locality has 
brought him a wide acquaintance, and he is held in high esteem by his many f riends» 
The fact that he is best liked where best known is an indication of his personal 
worth. Successful in his agricultural pursuits, he is ranked among the representa- 
tive members of the German-American element of this county. 



BLASIUS SIMON. 



Blasius Simon who has made his home continuously in Peru township since 
1834, covering a period of three-fourths of a century, is the owner of a well 
improved and productive farm of fifty-eight acres in that township, on which 
he resides. His birth occurred in Baden, Germany, on the 15th of March, 1833. 
his parents being Conrad and Mary Ann (Krieveler) Simon. The year 1834 
witnessed their emigration to the new world, the family home being established 
in Peru township, Huron county, Ohio, where the father purchased a small tract 
of land and built a log cabin. After clearing the land he gave his attention to 
its cultivation and improvement and there carried on his agricultural interests 
throughout the remainder of his life, winning a goodly measure of prosperity in 
his undertakings. His wife also passed away on this farm, and thus the com- 
munity lost two of its most respected and worthy pioneer settlers. Their chil- 
dren were as follows : Seraphine, George and Mary, all of whom are deceased ; 
Blasius, of their review ; Christian ; Anthony ; Andrew, who has also passed away ; 
and several who died in infancy. 

Blasius Simon was but a year old when brought by his parents to the United 
States and, as before stated, has since continued to reside in Peru township. 
In early manhood he learned the carpenter's trade and for a number of years 
was actively and successfully identified with the building interests of the county, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 195 

erecting a large number of houses and barns. In 1862 he purchased his present 
farm of fifty-eight acres from George Sowers and turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, in which field of activity he has likewise met with success. As' 
the years have gone by he has brought the property under a high state of culti- 
vation and has made many substantial improvements thereon, remodeling the 
residence, etc. In recent years, however, he has largely put aside the active 
work of the fields and his farm is now being operated by his son Edward. 

On the 4th of June, 1861, Mr. Simon was united in marriage to Miss Kathryn 
Hills, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann (Biddle) Hills, both of whom are 
now deceased. Mrs. Simon was a little maiden of seven years when she came 
with her parents to Norwalk township, this county. She was one of ten chil- 
dren, the record of whom is as follows : Helen, Frances, Mary and Jennie, all of 
whom have passed away ; Kathryn ; Tracy, who is likewise deceased ; Fred ; 
Joseph; and two who died in infancy. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Simon have been 
born six children. Amelia, living in Ridgefield township, is the wife of Law- 
rence Smith and has three children: Edward, Anna and Otto. Albert, a resi- 
dent of Norwalk, wedded Miss Rose Meyer, by whom he has four children: 
Walter, Henry, Mildred and Fred. Rose is still under the parental roof. George, 
who makes his home at Monroeville, married Miss Rosella Frey and had five 
children: Alfred; Reuben; Helen; Hilda, who is deceased; and Norman. Ed- 
ward, who wedded Miss Emma Frey, lives at home and manages his father's 
farm. Andrew was called to his final rest at the age of eighteen years. 

The different members of the family are all faithful communicants of the 
Catholic church. Mr. Simon has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's 
journey and that his career has been at all times above reproach and worthy of 
commendation is indicated by the high esteem and regard in which he is held by 
those among whom practically his entire life has been spent. His memory forms 
a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present and he 
has been an interested witness of the wonderful transformation that has been 
wrought as pioneer conditions have gradually given way before the onward 
march of civilization. 



WILLIAM HENRY SNYDER. 

William Henry Snyder, now living retired in North Fairfield, is numbered 
among the honored veterans of the Civil war and is also classed with those men 
who in positions of public service have demonstrated their loyalty to the general 
good by the prompt, efficient and faithful performance of duty. His record is 
altogether a most creditable one and because of his wide acquaintance in Huron 
county, cannot fail to prove of interest to many of the readers of this volume. 

Mr. Snyder was born in Greene county, New York, on the nth of January, 
1835, his parents being John and Harriet (Watrous) Snyder. His paternal 
grandparents were Feter A. and Hannah (Wells) Snyder, whose family numbered 
seven children, namely: John, Henry, Maria, Abram, Peter, James and Jane. Of 
this number, John Snyder, the father of our subject, was reared, educated and 



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196 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

married in the east and unto him and his wife were born five sons and three 
daughters as follows: William Henry, Hiram, Henry, Maria, Lucy, Vincent, 
Sylvester and Caroline. 

William Henry Snyder spent his youthful days under the parental roof. It 
was in 1854, that the family came to Ohio, settling at Snyder's Corners at which 
time William H. Snyder was a young man of nineteen years. He was prepared 
for life's practical and responsible duties by the educational privileges offered 
by the public schools and by the thorough business training which he received, 
under the direction of his father. In early manhood, he took up general farm- 
ing as a life work and carefully tilled the soil for many years, but at length with- 
drew from that field of labor and later was busily engaged with official service and 
also with the duties of the secretaryship of the Huron County Insurance Company, 
which position he filled for a number of years. He is still the owner of sixty 
acres of land in Ashland county and that farm returns to him a gratifying an- 
nual income. 

It was on the 5th of December, 1856, that Mr. Snyder was united in marriage 
to Miss Hannah Hinkley, a daughter of Benjamin and Maria (Paine) Hinkley, 
in whose family were the following named : Hannah, Joshua, Mary, Phoebe and 
William. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have become the parents of four children: Ida, 
Lucia, Harry and Benjamin. 

Mr. Snyder is entitled to wear the Grand Army button from the fact that he 
served as a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting in August, 1862, as a member of 
Company D, One Hundred and First Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He remained with 
that command until honorably discharged in 1863, when he returned to the north. 
He has always been as loyal to his duties of citizenship as when he followed the 
old flag on southern battlefields. His political allegience is given to the democ- 
racy and he has served as justice of the peace for a number of terms and as post- 
master at North Fairfield for four years. His official service has been character- 
ized by the prompt and capable discharge of his duties, his fidelity to any trust 
being recognized as one of his strong traits. He belongs to the Masonic fra- 
ternity and both he and his wife are connected with the Eastern Star, exempli- 
fying in their lives the beneficent spirit of the craft, which is based upon mutual help- 
fulness and the recognition of the brotherhood of mankind. 



CHARLES A. EASTER. 

One of the old farms of Greenfield township, Huron county, Ohio, is that 
on which Charles A. Easter lives. He was born on this place as was his father be- 
fore him, and the house which is his home was built by his grandfather in 1834. 
The latter, Archibald Easter, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1777, and 
was the son of John Easter, a well-to-do farmer and cloth manufacturer of Ber- 
ragh, near Londonderry, Ireland. Archibald Easter received a good education 
and as a young man, was sent to the United States to look after some real estate 
interests of his father. He could not return immediately upon the accomplish- 
ment of his business on account of the War of 181 2, and so sought employment 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 197 

in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, as a weaver, a trade he had learned in Ireland. 
After three years, he was made foreman, but in 1815, he returned to Ireland. 
In 1817, however, he came a second time to the United States, landing at New 
York. He came west by canal and lake to Sandusky, Ohio, and then to the center 
of the state, locating on a farm near Columbus, which has since been incorporated 
within the limits of that city. He lived on that place for a few years and then 
moved to Lower Sandusky, now Fremont, where he bought a farm, having pre- 
viously traversed on horseback nine states of the Union in search of a homestead. 
He was compelled to leave Fremont on account of the ague, and in 1819, came to 
this county, settling first on a farm in the center of Greenfield township, where Rob- 
ert Arthur now lives, and in 1830, located on the farm now occupied by his grand- 
son. On this land, he farmed until i860, when he retired from active life. In 
1824, he married Miss Rebecca Easter, who was born in 1801 in County Tryone, 
Ireland, and was the daughter of James Easter. They were united by Elder John 
Wheeler and became the parents of six children : two who died in infancy ; Elias ; 
Sarah, the wife of James McLane ; Keziah, who married Samuel Arthur ; and 
John, who was drowned in his youth. Archibald Easter died May 1, 1867, and his 
wife passed away June 6, 1883, both being buried in the Steuben cemetery. He 
had helped to organize the whigs of his township and later became a republican. 
He was a successful farmer and with his wife was a member of the Congregational 
church. 

Elias Easter, his son and the father of Charles A. Easter, was born Septem- 
ber 19, 1834, was reared on the farm and attended the public schools of Green- 
field township. Shortly before his father's death, he assumed charge of the home 
place, on which he continued the successful farming. On the 7th of June, 1871, 
he was married to Miss Jennie E. McMorris, a daughter of John and Nancy Mc- 
Morris, of Greenfield township, who had come originally from Ireland. Mrs. 
Easter died November 5, 1876, after having borne two children: Nancy, who 
died in.intancy ; and Charles A., the subject of this review. On June 14, 1888, Mr. 
Easter married a second time, his bride being Mrs. Marjory Aiken, the widow 
of James A. Aiken. She was born March 30, 1846, in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, and was the daughter of Richard Chilcott. Mr. Easter remained on the 
farm now belonging to our subject until 1892, when he removed to Norwalk, 
where he died May 5, 1907. He was a stanch republican and held the offices of 
justice of the peace, trustee, and others in his township. He was a member of 
the Greenfield Congregational church, in which he held office of some kind nearly 
all his life. 

Charles A. Easter lived on the farm on which he was born until 1892. He 
received his early training for life in the district schools of the county and upon 
leaving them spent three terms at Oberlin College, and then attended the busi- 
ness colleges at Sandusky and Norwalk. In the latter town, he worked for five 
years as clerk and stenographer and then obtained employment in Canton, Massi- 
lon and Cleveland. In the fall of 1907, he returned to Huron county to assume 
the charge of the farm in Greenfield township. It embraces one hundred and 
eighty-three acres of fine land, which Mr. Easter has brought to a high degree of 
productiveness. He follows a general line of agriculture and has been more suc- 
cessful than the average. 



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198 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

On the 22d of September, 1901, Mr. Easter was married to Miss Florence E. 
Bowsers, a daughter of Henry F. and Marana (Evans) Bowers, of Norwalk. 
Both parents were born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, and there were married, but 
have lived in Norwalk for thirty years. The father, a stone mason by trade, was 
a soldier of the Civil war and is a member of the local post of the G. A. R. His 
religious affiliations are with the Methodist church. In his family were nine chil- 
dren: Nellie, who married James A. Whitney, deceased; Fred W., of St Louis, 
Missouri ; Bertha E., the wife of George Snyder, of Toledo, Ohio ; Raymond E., 
of that city ; Charles E., of Norwalk ; Grace L., the wife of C. H. Baker, of Toledo ; 
Josephine, deceased, who married Ralph Husted; Florence E., now Mrs. Eas- 
ter; and Eva I., the wife of Harry Thorley, of Norwalk, Ohio. Florence E. was 
born in Norwalk, and has borne her husband two children: Charles E., born 
March 5, 1904; and Elizabeth J., born May 8, 1907. 

Though so recently a farmer on his own responsibility, Mr. Easter has made 
the two years tell in his bountiful harvests. The old farm, producing under one 
family for three generations, has attained a cultivation it never reached before 
and is a fine tract of land. Mr. Easter is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Nor- 
walk, No, 64, and of the Congregational church, and is a citizen respected in the 
community, among his fraternal brothers and in his church. 



SAMUEL W. ROWLAND. 

Samuel W. Rowland, a well known and respected resident of the village of 
Wakeman, was born in Clarksfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 12th 
of June, 1839, his parents being Ezra and Ann (Stiles) Rowland. He traces 
his ancestry back to Thomas and Daniel Rowland, who came to this country from 
Scotland in the latter part of the seventeenth century, settling in Connecticut 
Several of their descendants participated in the Revolutionary war. Ezra Row- 
land, the father of our subject, was a son of Aaron and Deborah (Dean) Row- 
land, who came from Putnam county, New York, to Huron county, this state, 
in 1818. They left the Empire state on the 10th of October of that year, making 
the journey in a wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen and one horse, and on the 
1 8th of November, arrived in Clarksfield township, this county. This district was 
a dense forest, but they found shelter in the log cabin of Captain Husted, an 
earlier settler, in whose gristmill Mr. Rowland was employed for a time. The in- 
mates of the little structure numbered twenty persons and as soon as possible, 
Mr. Rowland erected a cabin home of his own in the vicinity, assisting in the con- 
duct of the gristmill and in the work of the farm. In 1822, he left the mill and 
took up his abode on a farm which he had previously purchased. In the family 
of Ezra and Ann (Stiles) Rowland were seven children, namely: Rebecca and 
Benjamin, who are deceased; Aaron G., an agriculturist of Clarksfield township; 
Lucy and Jairus, who have also passed away ; Samuel W., of this review ; and 
Joseph, who is likewise deceased. 

Samuel W. Rowland was reared on his father's farm and continued under the 
parental roof until he had attained the age of twenty-one years. He obtained his 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 199 

preliminary education in the district schools of his native township and when 
twenty years of age, began teaching school. At the end of a year, however, he 
entered Oberlin College and after leaving that institution once more became con- 
nected with educational interests as an instructor in the schools of Montgomery 
county, where he remained until the time of his enlistment for service in the 
Union army. It was in August, 1862, that he became a member of Company A, 
Ninety-third Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting for a term of three 
years or during the war. His regiment was attached to the Army of the Cumber- 
land and was with General Rosecrans at the battle of Stone River, where Mr. 
Rowland was wounded on the 29th of December, 1862, a shot passing through 
his right ankle and splintering the bone. The wound was so serious that he was 
compelled to remain in the hospital for sometime and was afterward sent home on 
a furlough, a year passing before he again joined his regiment. After returning 
to the army, he took part with General Sherman in all the hotly contested en- 
gagements of that campaign and on the 17th of December, 1864, was again 
wounded, at Nashville, in the battle between Generals Thomas and Hood, being 
shot in the upper right arm by a minie ball when within sixteen feet of the Con- 
federate breastworks. This also shattered the bones of the arm and after leav- 
ing the hospital, he was sent to a Louisville institution to convalesce, but 
while there was honorably discharged from the army, the war having come to an 
end. He had proven a most brave and loyal soldier, never faltering in the per- 
formance of any task assigned him and returned home with a splendid military 
record. On again taking up the pursuits of civil life, Mr. Rowland was engaged 
in farming in Clarksfield township and during the winter months taught in the 
district schools. He also taught vocal music classes for a number of years dur- 
ing the winter season, being a musician of considerable skill and ability. In 1867, 
he removed to North Lawrence, Kansas, where he remained for a year and then 
spent three years in Medina, Ohio, being engaged in teaching during two years of 
that period. Subsequently, he went to Peabody, Kansas, where he taught for 
five years in the graded schools, which he had organized. His success as an 
educator was marked, for he had the ability to impart clearly and concisely to 
others the knowledge that he had acquired and was moreover an excellent dis- 
ciplinarian. Returning to Huron county in 1875, he established the family home 
in Wakeman and has here since continued to reside. He purchased a farm ot 
one hundred and seventy-five acres, one hundred acres of which was timber 
land, which he immediately began clearing, cutting seven hundred thousand feet 
of lumber in two years. The proceeds from the sale of the lumber were sufficient 
to pay for the entire property. Industrious and energetic, he resolutely set to 
work to develop a good farm and as the years went by gradually transformed the 
place into one of the finest and most productive farms in the county. In Nov- 
ember, 1895, he took up his abode in the village of Wakeman, where he has since 
lived retired in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. 

On the 4th of July, 1863, Mr. Rowland was united in marriage to Miss Betsy 
E. Waugh, a daughter of Lansing and Docia (Minor) Waugh. The father was 
a Baptist minister of Wakeman township, where the family resided for a great 
many years, both Mr. and Mrs. Waugh passing away and being buried there. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rowland have been born seven children, as follows: Justin 



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200 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

E., a practicing physician of South Euclid, Ohio ; Bertha D., who is the wife of 
Charles Russell of Wakeman township ; Dennis D., a resident of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Guy O., who is practicing medicine at East Palestine, Ohio; Park O., likewise 
living in Cleveland; Lansing E., of Denver, Colorado; and Lewis U., who is a 
musician of note and makes his home at Grand Forks, North Dakota. All of the 
children are prosperous and prominent residents of their respective communities. 
Mr. Rowland has always given his support to the men and measures of the 
republican party with the exception of one year, when he voted for St. John, the 
presidential candidate of the prohibition party. He is a strong advocate of the 
cause of temperance and an ardent worker in its behalf, believing that the intem- 
perate use of intoxicating liquors is the greatest curse with which our country has to 
contend. In the spring of 1896, he was elected justice of the peace and with the 
exception of one term has since served continuously in that office, being the in- 
cumbent at the present time. His decisions are strictly fair and impartial and he 
is widely recognized as a most able and just judge. He has been a member of the 
school board for two terms and all public improvements, such as the establishment 
of good schools, roads, etc., receive his hearty support and co-operation. . He and 
his family are earnest and faithful members of the Congregational church, in 
which he has acted as a deacon for many years. For many years, he was also 
chorister in the church and, although he has now reached the Psalmist's allotted 
span of three score years and ten, still sings in the choir and acts as assistant chor- 
ister. He is interested and active in church and Sunday school work and in fact in 
all religious societies organized to promote moral advancement. He still main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in 
Wilson Todd Post, No. 559, G. A. R/, and has served as an officer of the post ever 
since becoming identified therewith, acting as chaplain at the present time. He 
has been a delegate to both state and national encampments and is a most en- 
thusiastic and valued member of the organization. In spite of his hazardous and 
severe experiences as a soldier, Mr. Rowland is still in excellent health, which he 
attributes in large measure to the fact that he has never used tobacco or stimu- 
lants in any form and it is only in recent years that he has indulged even in tea. 
Although now past the seventieth milestone on life's journey, in spirit and inter- 
ests, he seems yet in his prime, for he has always associated to a great extent 
with young people and thus has ever maintained the enthusiasm of his earlier 
years in all the varied activities and pleasures of life. 



WILLIAM T. ASHTON. 

William T. Ashton, who is now living retired on his fine farm of one hun- 
dred and ninety-two acres in Peru township, was born in this township on the 
10th of January, 1850. His parents, William and Sallie (Burch) Ashton, were 
natives of Lincolnshire, England, and New York state respectively, the father's 
birth having occurred on the 9th of March, 1819. The paternal grandparents 
of our subject were among the first settlers of Peru township, having made the 
journey to this part of the state by wagon in 1831. The grandfather erected a 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 203 

log house and resolutely set himself to the task of clearing a tract of one hun- 
dred and thirty acres of land which he had purchased, but died within a year 
of his arrival in this county. His family numbered seven children, all of whom 
are now deceased, namely : James, Thomas, William, John, Edward, Mary, and 
one who passed away in infancy. 

William Ashton, the father of William T. Ashton, was a lad of twelve years 
when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Peru township, Huron 
county, and there he continued to make his home until called to his final rest on 
the 17th of March, 1890. In 1866 he purchased the farm which is now in pos- 
session of his son, William T., erected a commodious residence and barns and 
also placed many other substantial improvements on the property. As the years 
passed by he won a goodly measure of prosperity in the conduct of his agri- 
cultural interests and became widely recognized as a substantial and representa- 
tive citizen of the community. His wife, who had accompanied her parents on 
their removal from the Empire state to Huron county, passed away in 1872 when 
forty-eight years of age. Unto this worthy couple were born five children, as 
follows : Mary, who is now deceased ; Anna, who is the wife of C. A. Howe and 
resides at Monroeville, Ohio ; William T., of this review ; and Lewis J. and Eva, 
who are likewise deceased. 

At the usual age William T. Ashton began his education by becoming a 
student in the district schools of this county. His training at farm labor was 
not meager, for at an early age he began work in the fields and soon became 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He 
was successfully and energetically identified with general agricultural pursuits 
throughout his entire business career but has recently retired from the active 
work of the fields and now rents his farm. It is a well improved and valuable 
tract of land comprising one hundred and ninety-two acres and he still makes 
his home on the farm, having here a commodious and modern residence. His 
well directed and untiring industry in former years brought him the compe- 
tence that now enables him to live practically retired, and throughout the com- 
munity in which his entire life has been spent he is well known and highly es- 
teemed as a most worthy and prosperous citizen. 

On the 3d of February, 1872, Mr. Ashton was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma P. Knoll, whose birth occurred in Ridgefield township, Huron county, 
in 1856, her parents being Christian and Elizabeth Knoll, of Ridgefield town- 
ship. The three children born unto Mr. and Mrs. Ashton are as follows : Clara, 
a graduate of the Zenaium Art School at Columbus, is now the wife of P. W. 
Clark, who conducts a business college at Louisville, Kentucky. Their union 
has been blessed with one son, William A. Alice, a graduate of the Monroeville 
high school, gave her hand in marriage to Professor Oscar Erf, who is profes- 
sor of the dairy department at the Ohio State University. They reside at 
Columbus and have one son, Lowell. Myrtle, likewise a graduate of the Monroe- 
ville high school, lives at home with her father. The wife and mother was 
called to her final rest on the 7th of September, 1907, her loss being deeply 
mourned by an extensive circle of friends as well as her immediate family. 

In his political views Mr. Ashton was formerly a democrat and on that ticket 
was elected to the office of township trustee, in which he served for a number of 



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204 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

years. At the present time, however, he gives his allegiance to the men and 
measures of the republican party, believing its principles to be most conducive 
to good government. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
Presbyterian church at Monroeville. A man of sterling character, he has always 
merited and received the confidence and respect of all with whom business or 
social relations have brought him in contact. 



ISAAC McKESSON. 



The life history of Isaac McKesson constitutes an important chapter in the 
annals of Huron county. He figured prominently in industrial and political circles 
for many years, but is now living retired from active business save for the interest 
which he feels in the world's progress. He represents a family whose name has 
long been interwoven with the early history of Ohio, the family arriving in this 
state in 1827, settlement being made in Venice in what is now Erie county. On 
the paternal side, Mr. McKesson comes of Scotch lineage, his grandfather, John 
McKesson, a Presbyterian minister, having come from Scotland to America in 
1 761 and locating m York count}, Pennsylvania. He was a typical Scotch Pres- 
byterian, who proved a power for good in the community in which he resided dur- 
ing the early days of the "new world" as America was then commonly designated. 
He wielded a wide influence by reason of his strict integrity and honorable man- 
hood, while his life at all times measured up to a high moral standard. 

His son, Isaac McKesson, Sr., the father of our subject, was also educated 
for the ministry but his natural taste for mechanics led him to abandon that call- 
ing before he had completed his theological course and he later learned the trade 
of a millwright and civil engineer. Attracted by the favorable location for mills 
in Venice, Erie county, Ohio, he removed to that place in 1827, where for a num- 
ber of years he followed his trade of millwright and also did considerable sur- 
veying and civil engineering. Later he resided in Bellevue for some years and 
subsequently purchased a farm near Venice, where he engaged in farming up to 
the time of his death, which occurred in 1854. He had been a prominent figure 
in the development of the locality in which he resided, aiding very materially 
in the improvement of milling property, and was recognized as one of the leading 
and valued citizens of his part of the county. Ere coming to Ohio, he had married 
Miss Elizabeth Caldwell, and in their family were the following children: Jane; 
James ; John ; Oliver ; William, who passed away in infancy ; William ; Elizabeth 
and Isaac, all of whom are now deceased with the exception of the last named. 

Isaac McKesson, whose name introduces this review, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania on the 1 2th of January, 1821, and was therefore a little lad of six years when 
he accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio. Spending the period of 
his boyhood and youth under the parental roof, he is indebted to the district 
school system for the educational advantages which he enjoyed. Early in life, 
after giving careful thought concerning the work for which he was best adapted 
and which in his estimation would prove the most profitable, he decided to follow 
in the footsteps of his father, and under his direction and guidance learned the 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 205 

trade of a millwright and carpenter. This he followed for a few years, at the same 
time giving considerable time to the management of his father's farming prop- 
erty. He was married on the 28th of October, 1841, to Miss Zorada J. Hunt, 
a daughter of John and Nancy (Lord) Hunt, natives of New Hampshire, who 
came to Ohio about 181 6, locating in Norwalk, where Mr. Hunt engaged in the 
cooperage business. 

After his marriage, Mr. McKesson located at Enterprise, Erie county, Ohio, 
where he operated a sawmill for about a year, and then for two years he was 
engaged in carpentering and was also identified with agricultural pursuits. 
Later, he rented a farm near Sandusky, which he cultivated for about two years, 
and at the same time worked at his trade as carpenter, erecting many houses 
throughout the community, most of which were constructed of hewn logs. Sub- 
sequently, he purchased a farm in York township, Sandusky county, and there he 
engaged in general farming for six years, when he bought a farm in Grotoa 
township, Erie county, upon which he resided until 1866, when he purchased 
property in Collins, Huron county, to which he removed in 1869 and which he has 
since continued to make his place of residence. After his arrival in Huron county, 
he became the proprietor of a sawmill and bending works, his plant being the first 
steam bending works to be established in that section of the county. He also 
engaged in the manufacture of force pumps, which were a new feaure at that time, 
and the fact that Mr. McKesson added to his pump the double action caused his 
product to be a vast improvement upon that which had hitherto been placed upon 
the market. The Growth of the business, therefore, was very rapid and soon 
reached extensive proportions, the enterprise becoming one of the leading and 
important industries of Huron county. In 1880, however, he sold his interests 
and practically retired from active life. A man of keen business acumen, dur- 
ing his connection with industrial interests, he so capably controlled his various 
enterprises that he became recognized as one of the prominent business men of 
Townsend township. He also possessed considerable real estate, for as the years 
went by and he prospered, he invested in land, becoming the owner of property 
interests in Collins and also in Towtnsend township. For some years, he also 
operated a sawmill and turning plant upon land which he owned in Michigan, not 
far from Jackson, but since retirement from business, he has unfortunately lost 
most of this property. 

Not merely because of the success which he won in the business world is Mr. 
McKesson entitled to special mention in this volume, but also by reason of his 
deep and helpful interest in the public affairs of the community and the promi- 
nent position which he held in local political circles. He is a stalwart republican, 
and has been very active in the affairs of the party for many years, having been 
called to various positions of trust by his fellow citizens. He served as trustee of 
Groton township for eight years, was justice of the peace for three years, town- 
ship treasurer for two years, served for two terms as county commissioner of 
Erie county and was offered the nomination for a third term by the unamimous 
vote of the convention, but declined the honor. He. was also elected trustee of 
Townsend township, serving for two terms, and in both Erie and Huron counties, 
he was a member of the school board for many years. He has been a prominent 
figure in county, district and state conventions, having been a delegate to the 



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206 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

first republican county convention held in Erie county. He called the first 
republican caucus in Groton township, Erie county, and was a delegate to the 
convention that first nominated John Sherman for congress, held in Shelby, Ohio. 
He assisted in organizing the first county fair association in Erie county and was 
a member of the board of directors, while after his arrival in Huron county, he 
became a director of the Huron County Agricultural Society, which position he 
filled for some time. He was likewise active in the movement which resulted in 
the establishment of a children's home in Huron county and for twenty-two years 
served as a trustee of the home, eventually resigning his position on account of 
ill health. Mr. McKesson was also very active in the affairs of Erie county and 
those of Ohio, during the period of the Civil war. He was commissioned by Gov- 
ernor Tod, lieutenant colonel of the Second Regiment, Ohio National Guard, and 
was active in securing Erie county's quota of troops. He also made it his duty to 
see that the families of the soldiers were properly cared for and gave not only 
freely of his time, but also liberally of his means to provide whatever was neces- 
sary for their welfare, thereby manifesting to some extent the spirit of philan- 
thropy that underlies his nature. 

As the years passed the home of Mr. and Mrs. McKesson was blessed with 
two children : Lester and Nancy E. The daughter is now Mrs. George Liles, of Col- 
lins. The son, when only eighteen years of age, at the first call for troops enlisted 
on the 8th of April, 1861 as a member of the Eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, and served for a term of three months. After his discharge, he imme- 
diately re-enlisted for three years, and throughout that period, he served with 
distinction, participating in more than seventy battles and skirmishes. He was 
thrice wounded, at Fredericksburg, later at Gettysburg and again at the battle of 
the Wilderness. The last wound was at first thought to be mortal but he re- 
covered. He was promoted from a private to the rank of lieutenant and the rec- 
ords show that he was a brave and courageous officer, remaining at all times 
loyal to the old flag and the cause which it represented. After the close of the 
war, he returned home and entered business life, being now engaged in the real 
estate business in Toledo, Ohio. He is a man of high character, who stands well 
in his community and is a worthy son of an honored father. 

Mr. McKesson was called upon, in the fall of 1878, to mourn the loss of his 
wife, and in March, 1880, he was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Harriet (Reese) Emmerson, the widow of Henry Emmerson. She, too, 
passed away on the 1st of July, 1886, and for his third wife, Mr. McKesson chose 
Mrs. Rebecca (Balliet) Van Buskirk, whom he married on the 1st of November, 
1887. She is the widow of Samuel Van Buskirk and a daughter of Henry and 
Catherine (Montz) Balliet, of Richland county, who originally came from Penn- 
sylvania and were prominent farming people. 

Mr. McKesson and his family have held membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church for many years, he having been a member of that denomination for 
more than seventy years. During his connection therewith, he has been very 
active in church work and has held every office in the church below the clergy. He 
has been especially active and helpful in the direction of Sunday school work, hav- 
ing organized and assisted in maintaining various Sabbath schools where none 
had previously existed. Mr. McKesson is a great humanitarian at heart and has 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 207 

ever been a stalwart supporter of those measures which serve to promote general 
progress along material, political, intellectual and moral lines, and also to uplift 
and maintain a high standard of citizenship. He is a splendid type of the high- 
minded American gentleman and an excellent example of the power and force 
of honorable manhood, of earnest effort and of high principles. He has now 
reached the eighty-eighth mile stone on life's journey and he can look back upon 
the past without regret and upon the future without fear. 



AUGUST SCHEID. 



August Scheid, who has long been numbered among the most enterprising, 
energetic and successful agriculturists of Peru township, is the owner of a rich 
and arable tract of land of one hundred and forty-four acres. He is a native son 
of Huron county, his birth having occurred in Peru township on the 26th of 
October, 1858. His parents, John William and Catherine (Beilstein) Scheid, 
were both natives of Germany, the former born on the 9th of January, 1818, and 
the latter in 1826. In 1849 the father accompanied his parents on their emigration 
to the new world, the family home being established in Peru township, Huron coun- 
ty, Ohio, where both the grandfather and grandmother of our subject passed away. 
John William Scheid, the father of August Scheid, continued to make his home in 
Peru township until called to his final rest on the 30th of November, 1903, being 
successfully identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his active busi- 
ness career. He assisted in the organization and erection of the Lutheran church 
in Peru township and served as one of its elders for a number of years. His wife, 
who had made the journey to the new world in company with her sisters and 
brothers, was called to her final rest in 1885. Unto this worthy couple were born 
six children, namely : Elizabeth, who is the wife of Charles J. Heyman and resides 
in Lyme township ; August, of this review ; Henrietta, who makes her home with 
her sister, Mrs. Hass, in Sherman township ; William C, living in Peru township ; 
Catherine B., residing in Sherman township, who is the wife of George C. Hass ; 
and L. H, of California. 

In the district and German schools of his home neighborhood August Scheid 
obtained his education and when not busy with his text-books assisted in the work 
of the home farm, thus early becoming familiar with the line of activity which he 
later chose as a life occupation. He is now devoting his time and energies to the 
cultivation and improvement of a farm of one hundred and forty-four acres in Peru 
township, ninety-five acres of which he received from his father, while the remain- 
ing forty-nine acres were purchased by him from the Lewis Hoffman estate. As 
the years have gone by he has placed many substantial improvements on the prop- 
erty and annually reaps bountiful harvests which find a ready sale on the market. 
He likewise has charge of the Heyman Milling Company's interests at Pontiac, buy- 
ing grain, etc. 

On the 21 st of February, 1882, Mr. Scheid was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Heyman, a native of Sherman township and a daughter of George W. and 
Elizabeth (Longscheid) Heyman, of Sherman township. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 



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208 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Scheid have been born ten children, as follows : George W., who is a teacher in the 
Ohio Normal University at Ada ; Estella, who is the wife of Fred Linder, of Town- 
send township; and Walter, Dora, Arthur, Herbert, Edwin, Ralph, Alfred and 
Harvey, all of whom are still under the parental roof. 

Politically Mr. Scheid is a democrat and his fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, have called him to various positions of public trust. He has 
served as township trustee for seven years, was justice of the peace for three years 
and in 1890 acted as real-estate appraiser of Peru township. He has likewise been 
a member of the school board, the cause of public education ever finding in him a 
stalwart champion. The Lutheran church of Pontiac numbers him among its most 
active and helpful members and he has served in various official capacities therein. 
In the community where they have spent their entire lives both he and his wife are 
most widely and favorably known, the circle of their friends being almost coexten- 
sive with the circle of their acquaintances. 



LOUIS ERF. 



Louis Erf, who is extensively and successfully engaged in farming and dairy- 
ing, is the owner of the Hickory Dairy Farm, comprising a tract of two hun- 
dred and thirty acres of rich and productive land in Peru township. It was on 
this place that his birth occurred, his natal day being July 28, 1866. His parents, 
Philip and Dorothy (Heyman) Erf, were both natives of Germany, the former 
born in 1832. When a young man of twenty-one years Philip Erf came alone 
to the new world and, securing employment as a farm hand, was busily engaged 
in the work of the fields for several years. Believing that the United States 
afforded broader opportunities than could be obtained in his native land, he then 
sent for his parents, Jacob and Kathryn Erf, and his two brothers, Anthony and 
Jacob, all of whom took up their abode in Huron county, Ohio. When he had 
accumulated sufficient capital, Philip Erf, the father of our subject, bought a 
small tract of land in Peru township and as his financial resources increased 
added to his holdings by additional purchase until at the time of his death he 
owned more than five hundred acres. The prosperity which he enjoyed w.as the 
direct result of his untiring and well directed labor and he was recognized 
throughout the community as a most successful, enterprising and representative 
citizen. He served as school director and township trustee in Peru township 
and also held other positions of public trust, ever discharging his official duties 
in a prompt and capable manner. His demise, which occurred in January, 1894, 
was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for his upright and honorable 
life had gained him the kindly regard and friendship of all with whom he was 
associated. His wife was but a little maiden of twelve years when she crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States in company with her parents, William and Jo- 
hanetta Heyman. She still survives at the age of sixty-nine years and now 
makes her home with her son, Louis. Her other children are as follows : Wil- 
liam, who is a resident of Lyme township; Lydia, the deceased wife of A. P. 



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LOUIS ERF 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 211 

Horn, of Lyme township ; and Oscar, who is professor of the dairy department 
in the Ohio State University at Columbus. 

Louis Erf obtained his education in the schools of Monroeville, Ohio, and 
after his father died took charge of the old homestead farm, which has since 
been in his possession and which has remained his place of residence from his 
birth to the present time. It is one of the finest farming properties in the en- 
tire county and the commodious and substantial residence thereon was erected 
by his father in 1867, but he has since made many improvements in the way of 
modern conveniences. His place is known as the Hickory Dairy Farm and in 
the conduct of both his agricultural and dairying interests he has met with a 
highly gratifying and commendable measure of success, being a man of sound 
business judgment and unfaltering energy. He was one of the promoters of the 
Star Creamery Company at Monroeville and is now a member of its board of 
directors as well as one of its stockholders. He is likewise the president of the 
Farmers & Citizens Bank of Monroeville, one of the promoters and stockholders 
of the Hess Hardware Company of that place and a director and stockholder 
in the Perfect Silo & Cement Company of Sunbury, Ohio. Possessing excel- 
lent executive ability and keen discrimination, his cooperation has been sought 
in the management and control of various other concerns and he has gained wide 
and favorable recognition as a leading and respected resident of his native county. 

On the 10th of February, 1897, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Erf and 
Elizabeth Henninger, a daughter of Jacob and Kathryn (Spatz) Henninger, 
of Monroeville. By this union there are three children: Philip, Clifford and 
Dorothy. 

In his political views Mr. Erf is a stalwart democrat and has served as school 
director in Ridgefield township, while at the present time he is treasurer of Peru 
township. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic lodge at Monroeville, 
while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Evangelical church. 
His life is exemplary in all respects and he has ever supported those interests 
which are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity by his own high moral worth. 
What he undertakes he accomplishes, for he possesses resolution, perseverance 
and reliability, and these qualities have caused him to be enrolled among the 
best citizens of this part of the state. 



EDWARD MUSHETT. 



Edward Mushett, engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ridgefield township, Hu- 
ron county, Ohio, was born upon the farm on which he now resides April 18, 1871, 
a son of Alexander and Jane (Harpster) Mushett. The former, who was born in 
New York in 1825, came to Ohio when a young man in company with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Mushett. The family home was established in Ridgefield 
township, where Alexander Mushett spent the rest of his life, devoting his time and 
attention to the occupation of farming. He was a democrat in politics and gave 
stanch support to that party. His wife was a native of Ridgefield township and a 
daughter of Philip Harpster and she passed away at an early age, leaving three chil- 



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212 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

dren to mourn her loss, of which number Edward, of this review, was the youngest 
Frank, the eldest, resides at Monroeville, Ohio, and Nellie, who married Fred Hoh- 
ler, lives on a part of the farm operated by Edward Mushett. Her husband is at 
present mining in the gold fields of Alaska. After the death of his first wife Alex- 
ander Mushett wedded Jemima Simmons and both are now, deceased, the former 
passing away January 12, 1907. 

On the farm upon which he was born Edward Mushett was reared to manhood, 
acquiring his education in the district schools and assisting in the work of the fields. 
He has never followed any other occupation than that of farming nor has he had any 
desire to engage in any other line of business inasmuch as he has been most success- 
ful in his agricultural pursuits. He now owns a third interest in the home farm 
upon which he resides. It consists of one hundred and forty-four acres of land, 
which was originally cleared by his father, who also placed all of the improvements 
upon the place. 

On the 24th of October, 1900, Mr. Mushett was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Enderle, a daughter of Charles and Louisa ( Kerris) Enderle, of Groton town- 
ship, Erie county, Ohio, and unto them have been born three children, Leona, Clif- 
ford and Ellen, all at home. 

Mr. Mushett belongs to the Lutheran church and he also holds membership in 
the National Protective Legion. He is highly esteemed throughout the community 
by reason of his genuine personal worth and sterling traits of character. He is 
public-spirited in citizenship ai)d always lends his aid on the side of reform, prog- 
ress and improvement, while he stands inflexibly for truth and justice on all occa- 
sions. 



AMBROSE FRAYE1R. 



The man to whom above all others the village of Greenwich owes its progress 
and the excellence of its municipal improvements and also its financial prosperity, 
is Ambrose Frayer. This public-spirited citizen was born in Greene county, New 
York, in the Catskill mountains, July 7, 1820, and is a son of Isaac and Charity 
(Leming) Frayer, who came with their family to Huron county, Ohio, in 1832, 
and engaged in farming. They had seven children : Ambrose, Loren, Philea Ann, 
Elliott, Earl, Amanda and Evaline, all of whom grew to maturity, though Ambrose 
and Evaline are the only ones who have survived to the present. The father died 
in 1889, at the age of eighty-three, outliving his wife by twenty years, she having 
died at the comparatively early age of forty. They were a highly respected couple, 
for they possessed many sterling traits of character. 

Ambrose Frayer grew up at home and remained under the guidance of his pa- 
rents until he was twenty-one years of age. He received his education at the little 
log country school and by reading at home in the chimney corner, with a hickory 
torch for a light. These were not large opportunities for winning a knowledge of 
books and men, but even as a boy he was a great reader, and through his associa- 
tion in later years with persons of high education has become a man singularly well 
informed upon matters of general interest and competent to render discriminating 
and good judgment. When he attained his majority he left the parental roof and 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 213 

engaged in farm work for others by the month. He soon was able to buy a tract of 
wild land, which he cleared, and to this kept adding until he had a farm of two hun- 
dred acres. He was successful from the start, and this place was but the nucleus 
of the six hundred and forty acres which he afterward possessed, all excellent land. 
For a number of years, in addition to his farming he raised fine thoroughbred 
horses and was about the first to introduce full blood merino sheep into Huron 
county. In these lines, as in agriculture, he prospered well, and he became known 
throughout the state and elsewhere as the breeder of roadsters of the finest quality. 
Upon both sheep and horses his judgment was often eagerly sought. Always alert 
to see the possibilities for improvement, he patented a fanning mill and a gate, the 
rights to manufacture which he sold in other states, thereby reaping a considerable 
amount. He established a factory for the making of the fanning mills at Plymouth, 
which was successfully conducted for a number of years. At the same time he en- 
gaged in general farming and the success of one seemed never to be gained at the 
expense of the other. 

His interests in the welfare and advancement of Greenwich are just as nu- 
merous and have borne just as profitable returns. The size of the village and busi- 
ness conducted there demanded a local bank and Mr. Frayer was foremost in the 
organization of the Greenwich Banking Company — the first bank established there. 
It was incorporated under the banking laws of the ^tate of Ohio, with a capital of 
twenty-five thousand dollars, Mr. Frayer being vice-president at the time of its or- 
ganization, and at one time president. Later he severed his connection with that 
bank and assisted in the organization of the First National Bank of Greenwich, with 
a capital of fifty thousand dollars, becoming vice-president, which position he has 
held to the present time, in this way having a guiding hand upon its affairs. It has 
been a very successful institution and has always been conducted along conservative 
lines. His other important commercial interest is that of the Greenwich Creamery 
Company. 

As both township trustee and treasurer he served the people for a number of 
years, and *for a long period was a member of the village council. While filling the 
latter office he proposed and carried to completion many municipal improvements of 
which the residents are now very proud, though in the beginning they opposed such 
progress. It owes its splendid water system and electric lighting plant to his agita- 
tion and also the brick paved streets. In short he has always stood for advance- 
ment and better conditions. 

Mr. Frayer has been married twice, his first wife being Miss Adeline Lee, a 
daughter of Benjamin and Mary (Smith) Lee, of Huron county. Of this union 
there were born five children : David O. ; Luella, deceased, the wife of Samuel Kelso 
of Mussell Fork, Missouri ; Eugene ; Mary, now Mrs. Arthur T. Burnell ; and Lina, 
who married Dr. Harry Fulstow, of Norwalk. Of these Eugene is a lawyer in New 
York city, and Mr. and Mrs. Burnell are prominent educators. Mrs. Frayer died 
September 19, 1874, and Mr. Frayer married Mrs. Lucy A. Mickey, the widow of 
Thomas Mickey. She passed away March 26, 1901. Appreciating from his own 
lack of it the value of a fine education Mr. Frayer has given his children the best 
that could be obtained, and they have all made excellent use of the advantages thus 
put within their reach. They are well established in life, and all are progressing 
in their various vocations. 



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214 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Frayer has always been a very active man and at the age of eighty- 
nine, he retains his interest in public affairs and looks after his business concerns 
as he has for many years past. He still owns a fine farm of four hundred acres, 
although Mr. Nelson Van Aken, who has been in his employ for twenty-six years, 
superintends it. In the fraternal organization to which he belongs he is also ac- 
tive. He was one of the charter members of the Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, F. & 
A. M., and has held all offices in the blue lodge. He is also a Royal Arch Mason 
and has been connected with the order for fifty-three years. In religious mat- 
ters he gives his support to the Congregational church and has always been inti- 
mately identified with the affairs of that body. In short, to sum up the results of 
his many years, no man has wielded a broader influence for good and progress than 
has Mr. Fra>er. If the good health of the past is vouchsafed him in the future — 
an idea of which may be gained from the fact that he has never found the need of 
glasses for even the finest print — there is every reason to look for the extension of 
this influence. 



WILLIAM E. JOINER. 



William E. Joiner, who has the distinction of being the oldest assessor in 
Greenfield township and in fact in Huron county, was born in the house in which 
he now lives, September 8, 1839, and is the son of Azias and Philura (Newberry) 
Joiner. The father was born July 20, 1797, in Colerain township, Hampshire 
county, Massachusetts, where his father, William Joiner, was a school teacher. In 
the spring of 1818 he came to this county from Cayuga county, New York, having 
made the greater part of the journey on foot. He bought a tract of two hundred 
and fifty acres in Greenfield township and in 1825 returned to Connecticut to ob- 
tain the deed to his land. He came back immediately and made this farm his home 
until his death. In 183 1 he married Miss Philura Newberry, who for almost half 
a century was his companion on the highroad of life, enduring the hardship of liv- 
ing in an uncleared forest, for Mr. Joiner had much work to do before he could cul- 
tivate his land. Unto them were born three children: William E., of this review; 
Wallace O., born March 22, 1842, a resident of Hillsdale, Michigan ; and Mary,, 
who was born January 5, 1844, and died October 10, 1871. She was the wife of 
Watson T. Smith, also deceased. Mrs. Joiner was called to her final rest December 
29, 1887, and her husband followed in a little more than a year, his death occurring 
May 16, 1889. He was a man of fine education and a great reader, who had ever 
evinced a fondness for mathematics. He was a public-spirited man as well and had 
held the office of township trustee. In the affairs of life he had prospered, through 
hard work, careful attention to details, and good management. 

William E. Joiner has lived on his present farm all his life. He was permitted 
a longer school period than many youths of the country can enjoy, for he was twen- 
ty-three before he discontinued his lessons. He took a course in double and single 
entry bookkeeping tor he had looked forward to entering the commercial world and 
winning success and a reputation as an accountant. It was his father's wish, how- 
ever, that he return to the farm and conduct its affairs — a wish in which the son 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 215 

acquiesced. He has been fortunate in his agricultural experiments, his fields are 
models of careful cultivation and his crops reveal what hard work may do. He has 
also entered into the life of the township. He is known as the oldest assessor of 
Huron county having been first elected thirty years ago on the republican ticket. 
He has since served sixteen years, and on the occasion of one election received all 
but one of the votes cast in his township. 

On the 14th of September, 1865, Elder Hahurst pronounced the words that 
made William E. Joiner and Miss Emma L. May man and wife. The ceremony 
was performed at North Fairfield, Ohio, and the union has been blessed with two 
children: Erminnie L., born March 17, 1867, became the wife of Charles H. Swi- 
gard, a civil engineer, who has charge of the irrigation improvements in the state of 
Washington, but she died June 26, 1891. They have one child, Minnie L., 
who lives with her grandfather, William E. Joiner. Hattie, the second daughter, 
married E, H. Bottten and lives at North Fairfield, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Joiner have 
also reared a niece, Dessie, the daughter of Watson F. Smith, who is now mar- 
ried to George Trimmer and lives at Peru, Ohio. 

Mr. Joiner is a member of the Congregational church and takes a prominent 
part in its work. A man of ability and unquestioned integrity, he has won a place 
in the hearts of the residents of his township, as was attested by the fact that there 
was but one dissenting vote at his election to the position he has held so long, and in 
fulfilling the duties of which he takes such a pride. 



WILLIAM HAMILTON McPHERSON, SR. 

William Hamilton McPherson, Sr., a prosperous and progressive agriculturist 
of Bronson township, where he owns a farm comprising one hundred and sixty-one 
acres of land, was born in Greenfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 14th 
of June, 1842, his parents being James and Jane (Arthur) McPherson. The father 
was born in Scotland in 1814 and in early life accompanied his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. William McPherson, on their removal to Londonderry, Ireland, but a few 
years later the family came to this country, locating on the farm in Bronson town- 
ship, Huron county, Ohio, where our subject now makes his home and where his 
grandfather died. His father, James McPherson, became a resident of Greenfield 
township and lived there until his death. In his family were three sons : George, 
John and William H. Our subject's maternal grandparents were John and Mat- 
tie (Easterly) Arthur. 

William H. McPherson, of this review, remained a resident of his native town- 
ship until he came into possession of his grandfather's old homestead in Bronson 
township in 1888, living here continuously since. He is now the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres of rich and productive land, to the cultivation and im- 
provement of which he devotes his time and energies. In the operation of his farm 
he displays practical and effective methods which produce good results, as seen in 
the abundant harvests which he annually gathers. 

Mr. McPherson has been married twice, his first union being with Miss Lucy 
Wheeler, a daughter of John Wheeler, by whom he had three children : Arthur, 



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216 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

William H. and Scott. Following the death of his first wife he was again mar- 
ried, on the 29th of June, 1881, his second union being with Miss Margaret Mutch, 
whose birth occurred April 28, 1861. Her parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (David- 
son) Mutch, were natives of Scotland and, emigrating to America about 1858, first 
located in Canada but subsequently crossed the border into the United States. By 
his second wife Mr. McPherson has two children, namely: Clyde, born in 1883; 
and Glenn, who was born in 1890. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. McPherson has given 
his support to the men and measures of the republican party and is at present serv- 
ing as a trustee of Bronson township. Fraternally he is identified with the Macca- 
bees, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian 
church at Olena, Ohio. In the county where he spent his entire life, now cov- 
ering a period of more than two-thirds of a century, he has gained an extensive cir- 
cle of warm friends by reason of his upright and honorable manhood. 



PHILIP HERNER. 



Philip Herner, numbered among the successful and enterprising agriculturists 
of Peru township, owns a half interest in the farm of one hundred and eighty- 
seven acres on which he resides with his brother Fred. He was born in Sherman 
township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 12th of December, 1862, his parents being 
Phedius and Lena (Hilderbrand) Herner, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
In early manhood the father crossed the Atlantic to the United States and took 
up his abode in Sherman township, this county, where he made his home through- 
out practically the remainder of his life, devoting his attention to the cultivation 
of a farm of eighty acres which he had purchased. His demise occurred in Peru 
township in 1905, when he had attained the age of sixty-eight years, while his wife 
was called to her final rest in 1904 at the age of sixty-seven years. 

Their union was blessed with thirteen children, the record of whom is as fol- 
lows : Mary, who is the wife of Christ Bauman and resides in Indiana ; Margaret, 
who gave her hand in marriage to Lawrence Linder, of Peru township ; Phedius, 
living in Peru township ; Emma, who is deceased ; Philip, of this review ; Eliza- 
beth, who is the wife of George Schild and makes her home in Peru township; 
Kathryn, the wife of Charles Schild, who likewise resides in Peru township; 
William, of Monroeville, Ohio ; Jacob, who has passed away ; Minnie, who is the 
wife of Albert Heyman, of Sherman township; Charles, living in Greenfield 
township; Fred, who wedded Miss Minnie Herbin, by whom he has two children, 
Gilbert R. and Arthur F. ; and Lottie, who is also deceased. 

Philip Herner spent the first ten years of his life in Sherman township and 
obtained his education in the district and German schools at Pontiac. Since the 
age of ten years he has made his hofne in Peru township and has always followed 
agricultural pursuits as a means of livelihood. The farm of one hundred and 
eighty-seven acres which he owns in partnership with his brother Fred was pur- 
chased by them from- their father and they have brought the property under a 
high state of cultivation and improvement. Alert, enterprising and progressive. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 219 

they have met with a well merited measure of prosperity in their farming opera- 
tions and have gained favorable recognition as representative and substantial citi- 
zens of the community. The brothers belong to the Lutheran church at Pontiac 
and their honorable and upright lives have made them well worthy the regard 
which is uniformly accorded them. 



M. C. PRICE. 



M. C. Price needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for he is at 
the head of the Norwalk Piano Company, one of the leading commercial insti- 
tutions of the city of Norwalk. Moreover he is a worthy and honored represen- 
tative of one of the oldest and best known families of this part of Ohio. He 
comes of a family of English-Welsh descent and the sterling qualities of the 
founder have been reproduced in the descendants. The Prices and Hatfields 
are supposed to have laid out the city of Baltimore, Maryland, and in 1664, Chris- 
topher Price leased Price's Commons, now an important part of the city, for 
ninety-nine years. He afterward exchanged his lease of land for a horse which 
he mounted and rode over the mountains to Lexington, Kentucky, where he 
reared his large family. His descendants have never sought to figure promi- 
nently in public life, but have been of the solid and substantial men and women of 
their various communities where they have acquired good homes and won honor- 
able names. Of this family, Governor Price, the founder of Leesville, Ohio, is a 
representative. When on a visit to Pennsylvania, he met Miss Sarah Rippeth, 
who afterward became his wife. They returned to Lexington, Kentucky, and to 
them were born the following named: Kit, William, James, John, Joseph, Basil, 
Joshua, Benjamin, Linda, the wife of John N. Adair, a merchant and hatter; 
Anna, the wife of Dr. Lawthers; Mrs. Sarah Smith; Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of Dr. Watkins ; and Mrs. Rebecca Brisbin. In about 1812, Governor Price 
rode on horseback from Lexington, Kentucky, and spent the night in a log cabin 
where the cemetery is now located. He bought a tract of land and returned to 
Lexington and when he again came to Ohio made his way up the river to Steuben- 
ville, a sparsely settled town. He was accustomed to hard work and immediately 
commenced the task of felling the trees and building a log cabin but the primitive 
home was soon afterward replaced by a brick dwelling. The family made their 
linen from the flax which they grew and their sugar from the maples in their 
camp. Governor Price was a farmer, but much of his time was spent in clearing 
land. He laid out the town of Leesville and at a public dinner the lots were sold at 
auction. In early manhood, he became a member of the Baptist church, but after- 
ward united with the Universalist church and always took an active part in its meet- 
ings. He lived a life of usefulness and died honored by all. His sons settled 
principally near Leesville, although a few of the family went west. 

James Price of this family was born at Lexington, Kentucky, November 17, 
1799. He came up the river with is father, Governor Price, in a rowboat when 
about two years old and when they stopped for dinner, he was left on the bank 



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220 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

and was not missed until they were several miles up the stream when the family 
returned for him. As a boy, he assisted in clearing up the land and afterward, 
learned the cabinetmaker's trade, becoming an expert workman. On the 14th 
of June, 1821, he married Miss Mary Holmes, a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth 
Holmes. She died October 2, 1865, and James Price afterward wedded Mrs. 
Gartrell. Mr. Price lived to see cities established where forests stood and the few 
friendly Indians disappear before the advancing modern civilization. He was born 
when Ohio was still a territory and lived to see many states added to the Union. 
His life was spent in honest industry and was fraught with many good deeds and 
characterized by kindly assistance to others. He embodied in his life the truth of 
Christianity without its forms and won the respect and good will of all who knew 
him. His children were : Clun, Sarah, Elizabeth, John, Susan, Samuel E., Bazaleel, 
Isaac T., Rezin, James C, and Meredith C. 

Of this family, Clun Price was born April 2, 1822, acquired a common school 
education and took up the study of medicine with Dr. Smith, of Moorefield, Ohio. 
He was afterward graduated from the Cincinnati Medical College and success- 
fully practiced his profession. He married Linda Hines and located at Birming- 
ham, Ohio. Their children were: Meredith C, Galen, John, Will, Tude and Lin- 
nie. The sons all became connected with the drygoods trade. In politics, Mr. 
Price was a republican and he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Sarah Price, the eldest daughter of James Price, was born November 3, 1823, 
and was a lady of many excellent traits of character. On the 20th of April, 1843, 
she became the wife of Amos Carr, a teacher, surveyor and merchant, who was a 
natural leader among men and had influence, because of his personal worth and 
ability. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Carr were born the following named : Lorin, Ermina, 
Annie, Ada V., Lish and Lou. Of this family, Lorin was born in 1851, and he 
displays many of the sterling traits exhibited by his worthy father. After ac- 
quiring his education, he turned his attention to merchandising and later com- 
pleted the study of law and was admitted to the bar, but abandoned his profes- 
sion to accept a clerkship in the Ohio house of representatives. Later he became 
connected with the railway mail service. In November, 1875, he married Lil- 
lian Hunt and they had a family of two sons and a daughter. Ermina Carr, 
the second child of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Carr, was born February 2, 1856, was ac- 
corded good educational advantages, and in 1871, became the wife of Alfred 
Canaga, of the United States navy, who was formerly professor of naval tactics 
at Cornell University, Utica, New York, but is now deceased. They have 
one son, Bruce. Annie Carr, born October 25, 1858, married C. M. Rippeth, 
a successful and popular merchant, and has one child, Mina. Ada V., born De- 
cember 24., 1859, was educated at the public schools of Baltimore, Maryland, at 
Scio College, and the Valparaiso (Indiana) Normal, from which institution, she 
was graduated. She was no less esteemed for her educational attainments than 
for her splendid womanly qualities, and has made an excellent record as a teacher. 
Lish Carr, born May 15, T865, attended the Leesville schools and later was grad- 
uated from Campbell University at Holton, Kansas. She married W. F. Holmes, 
a farmer near Leesville. Lou Carr, born April 24, 1867, was graduated from the 
public schools of Clinton, Missouri, winning honors in scholarship, and on the 22d 
of October, 1888, she married A. D. Walker, an attorney of Holton, Kansas. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 221 

Susan Price, a daughter of James Price, was born August 20, 1825, and died 
October 16, 1855. Her life was characterized by many noble qualities and kindly 
acts which endeared her to all who knew her. 

Elizabeth Price, the next member of the family, was born January 17, 1827, 
and became the wife of Ecton Roby, but both are now deceased. Their children 
were Maud, the wife of Webster Heron, a prominent business man of Columbus ; 
Eva, the wife of Charles Wheaton, of South Bend, Indiana ; and Merritt. 

John Price, another son of James Price, was born October 12, 1829, and be- 
came a millwright. When a young man, he went west, secured employment at 
Taylorville, Illinois, and soon formed a partnership in the milling business. He 
has developed an extensive enterprise, his trade extending over several states. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Hattie Cogle. 

Samuel E. Price, the next member of the family, born October 31, 1831, was 
educated in Hopedale College and afterward engaged in teaching school for a 
time and then read law with Judge Hance, of New Philadelphia. He married 
Miss Carrie Smith, principal of the New Philadelphia schools, and removed 
to Clinton, Missouri, to practice law. In his profession, he has shown marked 
ability, attaining high rank among the lawyers of that locality, while he and his 
wife have been active in educational work. He has been chosen and served as 
president of the board of education of Clinton. 

Bazalcel Price, born October 8, 1833, was educated in the common schools and 
began clerking for his brother-in-law, Amos Carr, at Leesville, while later, he 
became proprietor of the store, being regarded for many years as the leading mer- 
chant of Harrison and Carroll counties. In business matters, he was a man of 
strict integrity, never weighing any act in the scale of public opinion, and his 
career was at all times useful and honorable. He was a strong abolitionist, who 
did valuable service in the anti-slavery cause and became an enthusiastic republi- 
can, but supported Horace Greeley in 1872, and afterward voted the democratic 
ticket. On August 7, 1856, he married Jennie Burr, a daughter of the late Dr. 
Joseph S. Burr, and they had three children, Orrin, Wendell and William. Of 
these Orrin was born February 24, 1859, and was married October 30, 1879, to 
Clara Finney. For years, he was in charge of one of- the departments of the Jos- 
eph Horner Dry Goods Store, of Pittsburg. His brother William, born April 3, 
1866, occupied a similar position with Giddings Brothers & Bent, of Colorado 
Springs. Wendell, born April 15, i860, was graduated from the Northern Ohio 
University, August 28, 1883, and in 1889, married Florence Head, an accomplished 
musician and graduate of the same school. Wendell Price became well known in 
educational circles as principal of the Leesville schools. 

James C. Price, son of James Price, Sr., was born November 15, 1835, and 
when eighteen years of age learned the mason's trade and as a contractor, builf 
various churches, schools and public buildings. In 1859, during the Pikes Peak 
gold excitement, he with three others from Leesville, started for the gold fields and 
at Kansas City, bought an outfit for the trip. There they connected themselves 
with a wagon train of fourteen teams and seventy men and after a journey of 
seven weeks reached Denver, which at that time contained little but a government 
postoffice. Proceeding on their way to Colorado Springs, they met thousands of 
prospectors, who were devising all kinds of means whereby they might return to 



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222 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

the states. Of the party of seventy, only four remained. Mr. Price with a young 
man from Vermont, opened up a claim in what was then called Russell's Gulch, 
where they worked five men at two dollars and a half per day and board. Mr. 
Price spent his time prospecting between Mountain City and Pikes Peak and to 
the head of the Arkansas river. In the fall they returned to the states for winter 
quarters, again returning to the mines as before. In 1861, James C. Price re- 
turned to Ohio and in 1862, enlisted in the Forty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
At the close of the war, he did contract work in Cadiz, Uhrichsville and New 
Philadelphia. He married Miss Martha English, of Mastersville, and afterward 
became proprietor of the United States Hotel at Leesville, Ohio. His children 
are: Burdell, Neva, De Forest and Fay. 

Judge Isaac T. Price, a brother of James C. Price just mentioned above, was 
born November 27, 1837, and after acquiring a good literary education took up 
the study of law, was admitted to the Ohio bar, and afterward removed to Holton, 
Kansas, where he soon found clients and friends. His ability being of a high order, 
he easily won election three times to the office of probate judge. He has a family 
of four daughters: Effie, Ella, Myrile and Floy. 

Rezin Price, born February 26, 1840, learned the woodworkers trade and for 
a number of years engaged in the furniture business and undertaking, but later 
entered the employ of the Edna Piano & Organ Factory, at Monroeville. He 
enlisted in the Union army and met all the hardships and privations of military life. 
He married Miss Jennie Kail and they became parents of three daughters and two 
sons : Effie, Pearl, Merritt, Orlo and Marie. 

Merideth C. Price, born May 25, 1846, another son of Clun Price and the im- 
mediate subject of this review, was two years old when adopted by his grand- 
father, James Price, Sr. Under his care, he was reared to manhood. He was 
still pursuing his education when, constrained by a spirit of patriotism, he put 
aside his text-books and offered his aid to the government in February, 1864, en- " 
listing when a boy of seventeen years as a member of Company A, Eightieth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was made a drummer boy and what he lacked in 
years he made up in valor and loyalty, sharing with the other soldiers in the many 
hardships of war, particularly the famous march to the sea. At the close of the 
war, July 8, 1865, he received his discharge and when he returned home resumed 
his education as a student in Mount Union College, where he remained until 
1867, when he assumed the management of the drygoods store, owned by his uncle, 
B. W. Price. He remained with his uncle until 1874, and then established busi- 
ness on his own account as proprietor of a jewelry and music store. A year later, 
he bought out a stock of general merchandise and carried on business in the old 
Millisack corner until the fall of 1878, when he purchased the Crawford corner 
and thereon erected a model business block at a cost of nearly ten thousand dol- 
lars. Seeing the advantage of a newspaper, he established the Times and later 
on also published the Plaindealer from the Times office. On the 5th of Decem- 
ber, 1890, he sold his stock to A. F. Kail and became the largest stockholder and 
also the manger of the Edna Piano & Organ Company, of Monroeville. He fig- 
ures as one of the best known men of Leesville and contributes in large measure 
to the enterprise and upbuilding of the town, as well as to his individual success. 
He became the most extensive real-estate owner of the town, making investments 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 223 

from time to time in property, and paying more than double the taxes of any other 
citizen. For twelve years, he remained in active connection with the Edna Piano 
& Organ Company and then established business in Norwalk, opening a piano 
and organ store in the Williams block on West Main street, under the name of the 
Norwalk Piano Company. He brought to the development of this enterprise the 
same spirit of determination, industry and keen discernment that had promoted 
his success in former years, and was soon at the head of one of the most important 
undertakings of this character in his section of Ohio. His store was fitted up as 
a handsomely furnished parlor, containing easy chairs, divans and tables, large 
mirrors and many beautiful pictures. The rooms contained also a large stock 
of pianos of many makes, including the Chickering, Kimball, Ivers & Pond, Corl, 
Wisner, Boston, Nelson, Haddorff, Weaver, Krell, Winter, National, Lagonda, 
Foster, Royal and Ropelt. He also carries a line of the best known makes of piano 
players, together with all kinds of string and wind instruments, and a large line 
of music and musical sundries. The establishment is altogether attractive in its 
appointments and the kind of goods carried and the business has reached extensive 
and profitable proportions. His trade now amounts to about seventy-five thousand 
dollars annually and the business not only covers the state of Ohio, but extends into 
almost every state in the Union. It has been developed along modern lines of 
trade and commerce and is permeated at all times by a spirit of undaunted enter- 
prise and of unfaltering perseverance, which are essential factors to success. 

Mr. Price has always figured quite largely in the public life of the community. 
Many times, he has been elected to offices of trust and sometimes the contest has 
been spirited, yet he has never been defeated. He is not only a favorite with the 
voters, but with all who know him, including his associates in business and his 
friends in social life. He is a good conversationalist with marked persuasive 
powers, to which his success as a salesman has been largely due. His business 
career shows him to be a man of undaunted energy, capable of despatching an 
astonishing amount of business and inspiring his employes with the same en- 
thusiasm which he manifests. While not all days have been equally bright, he pos- 
sesses the adaptability that has enabled him to use each situation to the utmost in 
his efforts to attain honorable success, and frequently, he has thus been enabled 
to turn threatened failures into victories. It is characteristic of him that he has al- 
ways been warmhearted, generous and liberal, often accommodating others at a 
sacrifice of his own interests, and it has been truthfully said of him that no man 
was ever refused a favor when it was within his power to grant it. These quali- 
ties have won for him the admiration of all and his life record also displays many 
acts of kindness and benevolence. His nature is by no means self centered for he 
looks at life from the standpoint of a broad-minded man, who recognizes and 
utilizes his opportunities, not only for promoting his own interests, but of doing 
good to others. It has been truthfully said of him that he never tried to crush 
a rival, but only to obtain legitimate leadership, and he has extended a helping hand 
on many occasions to those who were traveling the same road as himself. For 
many years, he was regarded as a central figure in business circles of Leesville, 
becoming equally prominent in Monroe ville, and has now won for himself a place 
of similar honor and importance in Norwalk. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Price is pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married November 
14, 1901, to Miss Florence C. Canby, and unto them have been born three children: 
Meredith Canby, whose birth occurred February 20, 1903 ; and Charles Kenneth 
and Florence Emma, twins, born on the 1st of October, 1905. Mr. Price took deep 
interest in the Norwalk Centennial celebration, which was made a homecoming 
week, on which occasion, the men and women from all parts of the country re- 
turned to Huron county to again visit the scenes among which they had formerly 
lived. On the day which was set aside especially for Monroeville, the band 
from that town gathered in front of the store of the Norwalk Piano Company, 
playing several selections in honor of Mr. Price, who with his characteristic hos- 
pitality, then invited the entire number to a dinner at the Avalon. This was an 
expression of his warm heart and the open handed qualities which have endeared 
him to his fellowmen in strong ties of friendship. 



JOSEPH HOHLER. 



Joseph Hohler, well known in Huron county by reason of his former con- 
nection with mercantile interests and his present connection with agricultural 
affairs, lives in Peru township, where he owns ninety-nine acres of land. He 
was born in Pontiac, Peru township, on the 14th of March, 1856, his parents 
being Frederick G. and Catherine (Zipfel) Hohler, both of whom were natives 
of Germany. When fourteen years of age Frederick G. Hohler accompanied 
his parents on their emigration to the United States, the family home being 
(established in Peru township, Huron county, Ohio. Here they purchased a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres of timber land and for the first few years 
after their arrival in this county lived in a barn. This part of the state was 
still largely wild and undeveloped but they resolutely faced the hardships and 
privations of pioneer life and their labors proved an important element in the 
work of early development and upbuilding. 

Frederick G. Hohler, the father of Joseph Hohler, passed away in 1866 
at the age of forty-six years. His wife was also called to her final rest in the 
same year, having attained the age of forty-two. She had likewise made the voy- 
age to this country in company with her parents, who located at Monroeville, 
Huron county. Peter Hohler, a brother of Frederick G. Hohler, passed away 
in Peru township at the venerable age of ninety-five years. He was a stalwart 
adherent of the democracy and on that ticket was elected to the offices of as- 
sessor and township trustee, the duties of which he capably discharged for a 
number of years. Unto Frederick G. and Catherine (Zipfel) Hohler were 
born seven children, namely: August, a resident of Monroeville; Peter, who 
is deceased; Agnes, the wife of Mathew Gable, of Berea, Ohio; Frances, who 
died at the Cleveland Sisters' Home, was a sister of charity, 'known as Sister 
Martin ; Joseph, of this review ; Leo, who lives in the old homestead in Peru 
township; and Fred, who is in Alaska. 

In the acquirement of an education Joseph Hohler attended the district 
and German schools of Peru township, where he has resided from his birth to 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 227 

the present time. During his early life the family lived in a log house and on 
many occasions he would wake up in the morning to find several inches of 
snow on his bed. In early manhood he was engaged in the meat and liquor 
business at Monroeville for a number of years but throughout the greater part 
of his business career has been actively and successfully identified with gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits. About 1876 he bought his present farm of ninety- 
nine acres from Mr. Fitz and has since been engaged in its cultivation and im- 
provement. At the time it came into his possession the only buildings on the 
place were an old house and barn, but as the years have gone by Mr. Hohler 
has made a number of substantial improvements which stand as monuments to 
his thrift and enterprise. 

On the 15th of February, 1878, Mr. Hohler was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances Meyer, a native of Tiffin, Ohio, and a daughter of Samuel and Agetta 
(Hipp) Meyer, both of whom are now deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hohler 
have been born eleven children, as follows : Lucy, living at Monroeville, who is 
the wife of John C. Wilhelm, by whom she has three children — Milton, Ver- 
non and Charles; Mamie, who is at home; Henry, a resident of Hunts Cor- 
ners, who wedded Miss Mary Heater and has one child, Agnes ; Lena, who is 
the wife of Rover Derringer, and lives in Ridgefield township ; Edward, resid- 
ing in Michigan, who married Miss Carrie Cook, by whom he has one child. 
Opal; Tillie, Peter and Clarence, all of whom are still under the parental roof; 
Josiah, who passed away at the age of five years ; and Demons and Celia, who 
are also at home. 

In his political views Mr. Hohler is a stanch democrat and has served in 
the position of township school director, the cause of education ever finding in him 
a stalwart champion. He is a faithful communicant of the Catholic church and 
fraternally is identified with the Knights of Columbus at Monroeville. He 
is now in the prime of life and enjoys to the fullest measure the many advan- 
tages afforded by the present day and, being progressive, and a man whose life 
has always been in keeping with high standards, he justly deserves the confidence 
and respect which are uniformly accorded him. 



IRVING J. BROOKS. 



Irving J. Brooks, the editor and owner of The Greenwich Enterprise, was born 
April 15, 1857, in Bronson township, Huron county, Ohio, and is the son of Frank- 
lin and Ann Eliza (Kennedy) Brooks, both of whom were natives of this county. 
The mother's ancestors came from the north of Ireland, but the father traced his to 
England, and counted among them several men who had played an important part 
in the history of this country from the earliest days. William Brooks, the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a direct descendant of Lord Brooks 
of England, some of whose progeny came to America and held grants of land near 
the mouth of the Connecticut river, where the Say-Brooke fort of history, built to 
protect against the encroachments of the Dutch traders who claimed the territory, 



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228 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

was situated. William Brooks was graduated from Yale College with honors and 
entered upon the profession of teaching, which he followed for thirty-three years. 
During the Revolutionary war he served as quartermaster and took part in the bat- 
tles of Bunker Hill and Stillwater and was a member of that sturdy band who 
brought about Burgoyne's surrender. After the establishment of the Union he 
was commissioned by the government to survey on the Western Reserve, and Hu- 
ron county, Ohio, lay within his field of operation. On completing his work here, 
he returned to Vermont to bring his family to the new country. They arrived in 
1817 and settled in Greenfield township, Huron county, after having made a trying 
journey of many days with an ox-team. The entire land was at that time cov- 
ered with forests, in the midst of which the family settled, and which they imme- 
diately began to clear for the purpose of making a home. William Brooks was mar- 
ried, January 5, 1775, to Miss Keziah Haskell, who bore to him seven children. 

Lemuel Sprague Brooks, the grandfather of Irving J. Brooks, was born in 
Windsor county, Vermont, October 29, 1806, and was ten years of age when his pa- 
rents came to Ohio. He was a man of exceptional muscular power and carried off 
the honors wherever athletic sports were in favor. He married, at the age of twen- 
ty-seven, Miss Almira Adams, of North Fairfield, Ohio, who bore him two children, 
Franklin and Esther. Five years after this union he passed away, in 1838. 

Franklin Brooks was born in Greenfield Huron county, Ohio, January 13, 
1834. He grew up to be a man of fine mind, a farmer, and one who wielded no in- 
considerable influence in his community. On the 1st of November, 1855, ^ e was 
united in marriage to Miss Ann Eliza Kennedy, of Bronson, Huron county, by 
whom he had four children : Irving J., Gardiner A., Frank A. and Anna E. Frank- 
lin Brooks died December 11, 1897, but his wife still lives. 

Irving J. Brooks was reared on the father's farm, was educated in the country 
schools, going thence to the Lebanon National Normal School, and to the normal 
school at Ada. For several years after completing his education he pursued the pro- 
fession of teaching during the winter months and was both progressive and popular 
in this vocation. In the office of the Norwalk Chronicle he learned the printer's 
trade, with which trade he ever since has been closely connected. He left the Chron- 
icle office to go to Cherokee, Iowa, as foreman of the Journal where he worked un- 
til 1885, when he went to Mankato, Minnesota, to fill the position of foreman on the 
Mankato Journal. Three years later he came to Greenwich, Huron county, Ohio, 
where he assumed the editorship and proprietorship of the Greenwich Enterprise 
holding it to the present. It is a weekly publication of influence in the homes and in 
affairs generally of the village and township. It professes an independent republican 
attitude in matters of political concern, but is an organ that makes for the good and 
progress of the community that supports it, and during the twenty years that Mr. 
Brooks has guided is destinies, has won for its owner and publisher the good will of 
his constituents. Not only does he own the paper and the printing plant and build- 
ing, but he also conducts an up-to-date printing business. Yet these things do not 
consume all his time, for he has been able to devote a good deal of it to the ser- 
vice of the public. For a space of fifteen years he served as clerk of the township 
and of the township board of education for an equal period. He has also been a 
member of the school board of the village and also clerk for a number of years. In 
politics he is a republican and has been the Greenwich member of the Huron coun- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 229 

ty republican central committee and has frequently been sent to county conventions 
and been otherwise active in the party. 

On April 15, 1886, Mr. Brooks was united in marriage, at Cherokee, Iowa, with 
Miss Lydia R. Ruggles, who was born in Waverly, Van Buren county, Michigan, 
August 21, 1865, a daughter of Charles P. and Henrietta C. (Hobart) Ruggles. 
Her father's people pride themselves on their blood, being an old family. Her 
mother was of Puritan descent, tracing a direct line of ancestry to John Alden 
and his wife Priscilla. Mr. and Mrs. Ruggles never became residents of Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brooks are members of the Episcopal church, but as there is no place 
of worship of this denomination in Greenwich they attend the services of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, in whose work and interests they have taken large part, 
Mr. Brooks having been for a number of years a member of the board of trustees, 
at present filling the office of president of this body, and having been superintendent 
of the Sunday school for a number of years, and his wife taking equally efficient 
interest. 

Mr. Brooks belongs to a large number of organizations, fraternal, social, and 
such as are connected with his profession as journalist and printer. He was a char- 
ter member of the Forest Lodge, No. 145, Knights of Pythias, of Norwalk ; is a 
member of Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, F. & A. M., in which he has filled many 
offices ; also of the New London Chapter, No. no, R. A. M. ; and of the National 
Union. He is on the roll of members of the Audubon Society of Cincinnati ; of the 
International Typographical Union of Toledo ; of the Buckeye Press Association ; 
and of the Sons of Temperance, of Norwalk. He was formerly a member of Com- 
pany G, Sixteenth Ohio National Guard, from which he holds an honorable dis- 
charge from service. In his private life, in his public activities, and as the editor 
of a paper that is a factor in the village, Mr. Brooks wields an influence that is re- 
fining, elevating and educational, one too that is widely felt in the community. 
Mrs. Brooks is well known in the social gatherings of the village, and the home over 
which she presides is one of the most attractive and modern of those here. 



ARTHUR UNDERBILL. 

Arthur Underbill, a resident of Norwalk, is a railway mail clerk in the employ 
of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. He was born in Ridgefield 
township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 6th of March, 1867, a son of Isaac and Lydia 
(Gregory) Underhill. The father, a native of Herkimer county, New York, ac- 
companied his parents, David and Mary (Osborne) Underhill, on their removal to 
this county in the year 1817 David Underhill, the grandfather of our subject, be- 
came the owner of considerable land in this vicinity and operated the first sawmill in 
the county. He had first visited this section of the state in 1810 in order to locate 
land and subsequently made several more trips to Huron county, doing quite a lit- 
tle trading with the Indians. In the construction of his sawmill, which was built in 
181 5, he employed the services of nearly all the men in the county at that time. 
He also assisted in laying out the town of Norwalk and was a charter member of 
the Masonic lodge at that place, which held some of its first meetings in his home. 



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230 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

One of his daughters, Harriett, who was the first white woman to be married in 
Ridgefield township, became the wife of Major Strong, in whose honor Strong's 
Ridge was named. When David Underhill was called to his final rest in 1844 the 
community mourned the loss of one of its most worthy and respected pioneer set- 
tlers, whose labors proved an important factor in the work of early development 
and upbuilding. 

Subsequent to the demise of his father, Isaac Underhill continued to operate 
the sawmill until 1879 and remained a resident of Ridgefield township from the 
time of nib arrival in this county until he passed away on the 15th of March, 1885, 
in the faith of the Baptist church. His wife, who was a devoted and faithful mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, was called to the home beyond on the 1st of Octo- 
ber, 1907. Unto this worthy couple were born five children, as follows : Isaac M., 
who is deceased; Isabelle F., likewise deceased, who was the wife of Arthur 
Sprague, by whom she had one child, Kathryn B. ; Edwin, who wedded Miss Myrtle 
Husted and has a son, Roy ; Arthur, of this review ; and a daughter who died in 
infancy. 

Arthur Underhill obtained his education in the schools of Norwalk and after 
putting aside his text-books took up his abode on the home farm, where he con- 
tinued to reside until 1893. In that year he entered the railway mail service as a 
clerk on ihe Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad but at the end of six 
months was transferred to the Big Four Railroad, his run being from Cleveland 
to Cincinnati. Subsequently he was transferred to the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad, in which position he has remained to the present time, his run 
being between Cleveland and Utica, New York. He is the owner of a well im- 
proved and productive farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Ridgefield township, 
also owns some property in Norwalk and is altogether a most prosperous, enter- 
prising and progressive citizen of his native county. 

In December, 1884, Mr. Underhill was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Mah- 
ler, a daughter of John and Elizabeth Mahler, of Ridgefield township. The three 
children born of this union are as follows : Clarence, who married Miss Gertrude 
La Reau, of Monroe, Michigan, lives on his father's farm. He has one son, James 
A. Clara, twin sister of Clarence, is a graduate of St. Luke's Hospital and is now 
a trained nurse of Cleveland, Ohio. Jennie is still under the parental roof. Mr. Un- 
derhill is well and favorably known throughout the county in which his entire life 
has been spent and in the development and progress of which both his father and 
grandfather bore an important part. 



WILLIAM BOEHLER. 



William Boehler, who is now living retired in an attractive and comfortable 
home in Monroeville, Ridgefield township, was for many years identified with agri- 
cultural interests of Huron county. He was born in Lyme township, this county, 
on the 29th of December, 1852, a son of John Philip and Margaret (Seible) Boeh- 
ler, both natives of Germany. The father, whose birth occurred on the 7th of No- 
vember, 1823, came to the United States when twenty-six years of age, coming di- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 231 

rect to Ohio, where he located in Huron county. Upon his arrival here he was en- 
tirely without funds and was compelled to work by the month in various places 
throughout the county. His was a determined and energetic spirit, however, and 
by hard labor and careful saving he had accumulated, after three years, sufficient 
means to purchase a farm of eighty acres located in Lyme township. After a year 
he sold this property and purchased one hundred acres in Sherman township. 
Three years later he also sold this farm and removed to Peru township, where he 
bought land from George Turner, one of the oldest farmers in this county. He re- 
sided upon this farm for about forty-one years, actively engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and then retired from business life, removing to Bellevue. He remained in 
the latter place, however, only about two months, and then took up his abode in 
Monroeville, where his remaining days were spent, his death occurring May 3, 
1897. He had been most successful in his undertakings and became recognized as 
one of the extensive land owners of this county, his property holdings at the time 
of his demise amounting to eight hundred acres. He was also well known among 
local democratic ranks, serving as township trustee, school director and road su- 
pervisor of Peru township. He was also an active worker in church circles and as- 
sisted in erecting the Lutheran church at Pontiac and during his connection with 
that church was almost continuously in office. He wedded Margaret Seible, who 
was born in 1830 and came to Huron county with her parents when twenty-one 
years of age. Here she passed away on the 22A of June, 1883. In the family of 
this worthy couple were six children, namely: William, of this review; Henry; 
Minnie, the wife of John P. Meyers, of Ridgefield township ; Louise, the wife of 
Charles Heyman, residing in Peru township ; Philip, a farmer of Peru township, 
residing on the old homestead ; and Otto, whose sketch, in connection with that of 
his brother Henry, will be found elsewhere in this volume. 

William Boehler, whose name introduces this review, was reared on his father's 
farm and has continued to make his residence in this county. He acquired his edu- 
cation in the district and summer schools. He remained at home, assisting his fa- 
ther in the cultivation of the fields, until he attained manhood, when he started out 
in business on his own account, operating a farm which he had received from his 
father. He had early become familiar with the best methods of plowing, planting 
and harvesting and, energetic and persevering by nature, he at once bent his ener- 
gies toward the development of his property. He made a large number of im- 
provements on the place, which consisted of one hundred and thirty-two acres of 
land in Peru township, erected substantial outbuildings and installed all the modern 
equipment and accessories necessary to facilitate the work of the farm. It is now 
one of the finely improved farms of the township. He operated this place for about 
thirty-two years and his close application to business and his excellent management 
at last brought to him a substantial competence which enabled him to retire from ac- 
tive work, and, renting his farm to his son, he removed to Monroeville, where he 
purchased some property and where he now makes his home. 

On the 4th of January, 1877, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Boehler and 
Miss Mary Heyman, a daughter of William A. and Janette (Mohr) Heyman, who 
were both old settlers of Huron county. The birth of Mrs. Boehler occurred June 
25, 1854, in Lyme township. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Boehler has been blessed 
with eight children. The eldest, Louisa, is the wife of Charles Scheid and resides 



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232 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

in Sherman township. By her marriage she has become the mother of four chil- 
dren, Mable, Ada, Marian and Olive. August L., who was born August 6, 1879, 
married Anna Meyer and lives on the old homestead farm, which he operates for 
his father. He is serving as school director of Peru township and is also a trustee 
of the Lutheran church. Anna, who wedded Alvin Groff , died on the 6th of Sep- 
tember, 1908, at the age of twenty-seven years, leaving besides her husband one 
son, Morris, who resides with our subject. Minnie, the fourth in order of birth, 
passed away on the 8th of May, 1904, at the age of twenty-one years. Amanda, 
who married Henry Meyer, resides in Ridgefield township. Edith and Carl are 
still at home, while Elmer, the youngest of the family, passed away at the age of 
four months. 

Mr. Boehler is one of the prominent members of the Lutheran church at Pon- 
tiac, of which he is serving as elder and in the work of which he is deeply and help- 
fully interested. He is a stalwart democrat in political allegiance and on that ticket 
was elected township trustee, in which capacity he served for ten years. He was 
also school director for some time, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart 
champion, and he has also been elected to fill various other minor offices. Public- 
spirited in his citizenship, he readily lends his influence to all matters which have 
for their object the material, political, intellectual and moral advancement and up- 
building of the community. His life has been one of continuous activity in which 
lias been accorded due recognition of honest labor, and he stands today as one of 
the substantial and prosperous representatives of his native county, while his gen- 
uine personal worth and sterling traits of character have gained for him a high 
place in the esteem and regard of his fellowmen. 



. T. F. HILDRETH, A. M., D. D. 

Rev. T. F. Hildreth is numbered among those to whom the spirit of youthful 
energy and enthusiasm clings while time passes by and may, therefore, be 
termed "eighty-two years young/' for while he has covered more than eight 
decades since starting upon the journey of life, in his interests he seems a man yet 
in his prime, his cheerful word, ready smile and encouraging sympathy making 
him popular alike among young and old, rich and poor, in his home town. He 
has resided continually in Norwalk since 1885. He was born in Tompkins county, 
New York, November 29, 1826, and was the third son of Benjamin and Susan 
(Colegrove) Hildreth, both of whom were natives of the Empire state. In 
1833 the family home was established in Huron county, Ohio, where the father 
died September 20, 1852, at the age of fifty-eight years. His wife survived him 
until March 15, 1855, and passed away at the age of sixty years. They had a 
family of nine children, four daughters and five sons. 

The Rev. T. F. Hildreth was but seven years of age when they came to Huron 
county and in the district schools of the early day he pursued his preliminary 
education. He also assisted in clearing and cultivating, the old home farm until 
•nineteen years of age, being busily employed at the task of cutting down the 
trees, grubbing up stumps and preparing the fields for cultivation. He after- 



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T. F. HILDRETH 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 235 

ward studied for two terms in the old Norwalk Academy and throughout his 
entire life he has remained a student and a broad reader, thus gaining wide gen- 
eral information as well as thorough and accurate knowledge of the teachings 
of the church. Rev. Hildreth was but eleven years of age when he was converted 
and when a youth of sixteen he united with the church of his father, thus be- 
coming identified with Methodism. He felt called to the ministry but before he 
had fully decided to enter upon a career of that character he took up the study 
of law under the direction of the Hon. Samuel T. Wooster of Norwalk. He had 
not completed his law studies, however, when he was licensed to preach as a 
local minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and was received on trial in 
the north Ohio conference at Belief ontaine on the 22d of August, 1851. He 
occupied several important charges prior to 1864 when he was transferred to 
the New York conference and assigned to the pastorate of the Trinity Methodist 
Episcopal church on Thirty-fourth street. There his health failed and he re- 
signed in 1867, in which year he returned to the northern Ohio conference. Here 
his health improved and he was given charge of the Methodist Episcopal church 
in Norwalk, remaining as its pastor for three years when by the special request 
of the church at Ionia, Michigan, he was transferred to that place. He held 
three appointments of three years each but his health again gave way and he 
returned to Norwalk. Later he again entered into active relations with the 
northern Ohio conference and was again appointed minister of the Norwalk 
church, in which capacity he served for three years. He next had charge of the 
Lorain Street Methodist Episcopal church in Cleveland but after one year he 
severed his connection with the conference and took charge of the People's 
Tabernacle church at Music HpII, an undenominational organism composed 
chiefly of those who desire to do gospel temperance work. There he remained 
for two years when upon the death of its founder and patron, Hon. W. H. Doan, 
he retired to his quiet home in Norwalk where he has since remained. 

In 1863 the Ohio Wesleyan University conferred upon the Rev. Hildreth the 
degree of Master of Arts and in 1887 the degree of Doctor of Divinity. His 
ability as an orator made him greatly sought for at church dedications and on 
other special occasions. He had few equals in the pulpit or on the public plat- 
form and was purely an extemporaneous speaker. While well versed in all 
branches of learning, his style is simple and concise. He learned to think along 
classical lines but to speak in the language of the common people and it has 
been the power of the truth of his utterances clearly, forcefully and cogently 
presented that has made strong appeal to his hearers. He is a fluent writer and a 
poet of no mean ability. He has written many poems of merit which he has 
published in two volumes, bringing forth his Poems of the Heart in 1903 and 
Poems of the Home in 1907. These collections contain many gems and have 
been very warmly received by the press and the people. His views of life have 
ever been sane and rational, presenting a clear understanding of the conditions 
of the present time as well as the ideals presented in the Christian religion. 

In 1849 Dr. Hildreth was married to Mrs. Eudolphia C. Cherry, who was to 
him a genial and loving companion and helpmate until she was called from his 
side by death on the 30th of August, 1900, leaving the Doctor to finish his jour- 
ney alone. He is a remarkably well preserved man despite his eighty-three 



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236 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

years, bright, genial and cheerful, of noble character, active in mind and body. 
He is a splendid example to the rising generation of what a clean, temperate and 
Godly life will do. Among his fellow townsmen he is very popular and his 
words and work are yet a matter of strong influence among those with whom he 
is daily brought in contact. His work has been far-reaching in its effects and 
like the echoes which "roll from soul to soul" will "live forever and forever," 
for the seeds of truth and righteousness never die but bring forth fruit throughout 
all the ensuing years. 



E. L. BEELMAN. 



E. L. Beelman, who is well known in the business circles of Huron county as the 
secretary and treasurer of the Beelman Manufacturing Company of Chicago, Ohio, 
has been active in its affairs since its inception and by his excellent business ability 
and keen sagacity has been a potent factor in its continuous and rapid progress. 
He was born in Richmond township, Huron county, on the 4th of May, 1867, a son 
of Joseph and Eliza Ann (Moore) Beelman, farmers of that township. The father, 
who originally came from Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, where his birth oc- 
curred, settled in Richmond township, Huron county, where he purchased two hun- 
dred acres of land, which he continued to operate up to the time of his demise. He 
became a prominent figure in the public affairs of that township, having during his 
residence therein filled all of the township offices, while he was county commissioner 
for two terms, and served as justice of the peace for several years. He also taught 
school fcr some time in Huron county, and in politics was a stalwart republican. 
He passed away May 4, 1883, at the age of sixty-four years, while his wife sur- 
vived until 1887. In their family were nine children, namely : George, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio ; W. S. and H. M., both of Chicago, Ohio ; Jennie, the wife of Ed. Tan- 
ner, residing in Fairfield township ; J. L., in partnership with his brother ; E. L., 
of this review; Charles, who is engineer on the Toledo & Ohio Central Railroad; 
Sarah, who passed away at the age of eighteen years ; and Anna, who also passed 
away when fourteen years old. 

Reared upon the home farm, E. L. Beelman acquired his education in the district 
schools and until seventeen years of age remained under the parental roof, assisting 
his father in the operation of his farm. Then thinking to find other pursuits more 
congenial and profitable than agriculture, he learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed for a number of years. In 1902 he and his brother, J. L. Beelman, or- 
ganized the present Beelman Manufacturing Company, with five stockholders and 
a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars. The other members of the board were 
C. B. Tudor, J. W. Sheidley and Glenn Tudor, while the officers were J. L. Beel- 
man, president, J. W. Sheidley, vice-president, and E. L. Beelman, secretary and 
treasurer. In 1907 the firm increased its capital to fifty thousand dollars, with 
twelve stockholders, while the present officers are J. L. Beelman, president. William 
Glick, vice-president and E. L. Beelman, secretary and treasurer. The board of di- 
rectors consists of J. L. and E. L. Beelman, Ed. Weaver, J. W. Sheidley and Wil- 
liam Glick. The company does a general lumber business, manufacturing all kinds 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 237 

of house furnishings and patent step-ladders, and from its inception has been sig- 
nally successful, enjoying a rapid and continuous growth. The efforts of E. L» 
Beelman have been influential elements in its successful control and he has gained 
a high place among the progressive and prosperous business men of this district 
It was on Christmas day of 1889 that Mr. Beelman was united in marriage to 
Miss Estella Keesy, a daughter of John H. and Margaret (Johnson) Keesy, pio- 
neer settlers of Richmond township where Mrs. Beelman was born and reared. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Beelman were born three children, Letha, Fay and Laura, the 
eldest daughter, Letha, having graduated from the Chicago (Ohio) high school 
with the class of 1909 and now attending Athens Normal school. Mr. Beelman 
is trustee of the Chicago Lodge, No. 748, 1. O. O. F., while in his politics he gives 
his allegiance to the republican party, although the honors and emoluments of pub- 
lic office have no attraction for him, as he prefers to direct his entire energies to the 
conduct of his personal affairs. He is preeminently a business man who has worked 
his way up by indefatigable energy and untiring perseverance, while, aside from the 
success which he has won in business, his personal characteristics are such as have 
gained him the respect, confidence and good will of his fellowmen. 



HON. C. P. VENUS. 



Hon. C. P. Venus is the chief executive of Norwalk, whose mayoralty record 
has been characterized by public-spirited devotion to the general good and by re- 
trenchment in useless expenditure and the advocacy of progressive measures of 
improvement. At a crisis in the city's history, he proved himself equal to the 
emergency and with keen insight into the situation, met the conditions and in- 
stituted measures which were the salvation of Norwalk. 

His birth occurred in this city, March 6, 1853, and he comes of German an- 
cestry. His father, Sebastian Venus, was a native of Germany and while living 
in that country, learned the trade of a silversmith and jeweler. After coming 
to the new world, he established his home in Norwalk and here engaged in the 
jewelry business. From the Black Forests of Germany he imported the first clocks 
sold in Huron county and was a leading factor in the early commercial develop- 
ment of this part of the state. He married Elizabeth Amend, a native of Germany, 
who came to America with her parents during her early girlhood days. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sebastian Venus had a family of seven children, five of whom died in 1854 
between the 4th and 7th of August, being carried away during the cholera epi- 
demic of that year, the dread disease largely devastating Huron county. The 
surviving sister of our subject is Mrs. Rosie Fischer, a resident of Toledo, Ohio. 

C. P. Venus was reared in this city and at the usual age became a pupil in the 
Norwalk public schools. He afterward attended St. Mary's Academy at Dayton, 
Ohio, and, making his initial step in the business world, he became a clerk in a 
shoe store, where he was employed for a few years. He then joined his mother 
in the grocery business, in which they continued for a number of years, and then 
sold out, Mr. Venus at that time becoming connected with the Taber Dry Goods 
Company. He was thus associated until elected city clerk, in which position he was 



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238 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

continued by a re-election for four years. He was next made deputy postmaster, 
serving in that capacity for four years, and for a similar period he was in the rail- 
way mail service during President Cleveland's first administration. At the close 
of his term as deputy postmaster, he took up the life insurance business, represent- 
ing the New York Life Insurance Company, and has since continued in this field 
of activity with gratifying success, securing many patrons for the company and 
writing up a large amount of business each year. 

In November, 1907, he was again called to public office, being elected mayor 
of Norwalk on the democratic ticket. He has given to the city a businesslike ad- 
ministration, has sought to secure restrictive and constructive legislation where- 
ever needed and has done much practical work for the city's benefit. Shortly after 
taking the office several bank failures occurred in Norwalk, bringing about a crisis 
in the city's affairs. It was evident that something must be done to restore con- 
fidence. Mayor Venus calmly faced the situation, gave to it his earnest study, 
viewed the question from every possible standpoint and as a result, associated with 
him every prominent man in organizing the Chamber of Commerce which has 
since flourished and has done much for the city's upbuilding and the restoration of 
its financial status. He has acted as secretary of the chamber since its organi- 
zation and his work in this connection has been most far-reaching and beneficial. 

In 1875, Mr. Venus was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Kunzelman, who 
died in 1904, and unto them were born three sons and two daughters: Carl H., 
Louise M. and Robert E., surviving. The family is prominent in the social circles 
of the city and the hospitality of the Venus home is greatly enjoyed by their many 
friends. 

Mr. Venus belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Columbus and several other organizations. He is the originator and organizer 
of The Smile Club, which is one of the most charitable organizations ever started 
in Norwalk. With the assistance of several charitably inclined ladies and gentle- 
men of this city, this club was organized for the purpose of giving every needy 
child in Norwalk a bountiful Christmas and that its object has been carefully car- 
ried out may be ascertained by asking any waif in Norwalk. The club is still in 
existence and is a monument to the fertile brain and progressive and charitable 
spirit of Mr. Venus. He is an alert, energetic and enterprising man, who seems 
to realize the possibilities of every situation and in both his public and private 
affairs, has so co-ordinated forces and managed interests as to bring about the 
best possible conditions under the situation. His mayoralty record will ever remain 
a most creditable chapter in his life history. 



LAMBERT M. CHAPIN. 

Huron county numbers among its intelligent, enterprising and successful citi- 
zens Lambert M. Chapin, who for many years has been a prominent figure in 
agricultural circles and has also taken an active part in the public affairs of the 
community. Born in Hartland township, Huron county, upon the farm where he 
now resides, October 21, 1842, his birth occurred in a little log cabin which stood 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 239 

but a few feet away from the site of the present modern dwelling. He is a son 
of Morris G. and Garissa (Granger) Chapin, the former a native of Genesee 
county, New York, while the mother's birth occurred in Cleveland, Ohio. In 
1825, the father accompanied his parents to Ohio when but a young lad and in this 
state the remainder of his life was spent. He was engaged to some extent in farm- 
ing and became a large landowner, being one of the successful and influential resi- 
dents of the community in which he resided. He was an ardent democrat, taking 
a very active part in all public affairs and he was a gentleman of wide information 
and intelligence, his name being a synonym for honesty and fair dealing. He 
passed away February 7, 1887, and his remains were interred in Woodland ceme- 
tery at Norwalk, to which city he had removed in 1880, after retiring from active 
business life. His wife was called to her final rest April 14, 1891, and was laid to 
rest beside her husband in Woodland. In their family were four children, all of 
whom are now living with exception of one daughter. 

Reared to agricultural pursuits, Lambert M. Chapin spent the days of his boy- 
hood and youth upon the old homestead whereon he was born and upon which he 
has since continued to make his residence. He attended the district schools of 
Hartland township and when not engaged with his textbooks, his time was de- 
voted to assisting his father in the work of the fields. He early became familiar 
with the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting and under the direction 
of his father learned many lessons concerning the value of industry, energy and 
perseverance. In 1878, he purchased the farm across the road from the old home- 
stead and upon this place he has been busily engaged in general farming and stock 
raising, both branches of his business proving a source of gratifying remuneration 
to him. His property now consists of about three hundred and fifty acres of fine 
farm land, all under a high state of cultivation, so that he is ranked among the 
prosperous and substantial agriculturists of his part of the county. 

On February 22, 187 1, Mr. Chapin was united in marriage to Miss Martha J. 
Shipley, a daughter of Samuel P. and Harriet (Morrison) Shipley, both of whom 
were natives of Pennsylvania. The parents came to Ohio with their respective 
parents when young people, settlement being made in Olena, Huron county, 
where Mr. Shipley was engaged in the carriage business. He passed away July 
30, 1885, but his widow still survives at the advanced age of eighty-two years. 
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Chapin has been blessed with three sons, namely: 
Elmer L., who is married and resides in Cleveland ; Fred M., who is also married 
and operates a farm adjoining the old homestead ; and Samuel S., likewise married, 
carrying on general farming in Bronson township. All of the sons are success- 
ful business men and are well known and prominent citizens in the communities 
in which they reside. 

In his political relations, Mr. Chapin has always been a supporter of the republi- 
can party and has been very active in the public affairs of the community, having 
filled almost every office in the township. His public life has at all times been 
characterized with the same adherence to truth, right and justice as has been mani- 
fest in his private relations, and the consensus of public opinion accords him a 
foremost place among the valued citizens of Huron county. Fraternally, he 
holds membership in the Olena Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry, of which 
his son Fred M. was a charter member, and in the affairs of which . both 



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240 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

father and son have been extremely active. Mr. and Mrs. Chapin hold mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church, to which they are liberal contributors and 
deeply interested in the various phases of the church work, while Mr. Chapin is 
now serving in the capacity of church trustee. He has passed his entire life on 
the old homestead where he was born with the exception of a few years, when 
his sons were attending school. During that period the family lived in Norwalk 
but after they had completed their education, the family returned to the farm. 
Mr. and Mrs. Chapin have traveled extensively and have acquired a very wide gen- 
eral knowledge. They are readers of all the best current literature, and thus they are 
able to speak authoritatively upon all of the live topics of the day. The family 
residence is one of the most comfortable and attractive homes of Hartland town- 
ship and is pervaded by an atmosphere of refinement and culture, which is both 
pleasing and uplifting. It is also the seat of a genuine and cordial hospitality, 
which makes it a favorite resort with a large circle of warm friends. 



DANIEL S. WASHBURN. 

Daniel S. Washburn, well known as a prominent and worthy representative 
of the agricultural interests of the county, and having large holdings in Green- 
wich and Ripley townships, was born April 8, 1843, near where he now resides 
and where he has always lived. He is the son of Henry G. and Ann Maria (Van 
Benschoten) Washburn, the father coming as a young man from Ulster county, 
New York, in 1830, followed later by his parents. The mother was a native of 
Berlin, Erie county, Ohio. Both the Washburns and the Van Benschotens were 
from colonial families and had many representatives in the war for independ- 
ence and later were leaders in the formation of the republic. The latter were 
particularly active and were honored personal friends of General Washington. 

Henry G. Washburn and wife were married in 1842 and settled in Green- 
wich township, where they continued residence through life. Here they reared 
their family of four children : Daniel S., Susanna M., Alice E. and Jay. Susanna 
died at the age of eighteen. Henry G. Washburn was a pushing, energetic man, 
who came to Ohio with a pittance and increased it to a competency, at the same 
time taking an intelligent interest in the life of the community. His business 
was farming but he also became widely known as a breeder of fine cattle and 
sheep. After a long and useful life, he passed away in September, 1886. Mrs. 
Washburn still survives, a kindly, vivacious lady who retains her faculties and, 
at the age eighty-six, goes about with the apparent vigor of middle life. 

Daniel S. Washburn received somewhat more than the usual amount of edu- 
cation for his time, having attended the normal school at Milan, Ohio. Having been 
reared under the tutelage of a skillful and prosperous farmer, he decided to 
continue the work as a life occupation and has consistently followed it. After 
his marriage he and his wife located where they now reside, their life being 
passed without a single change. They have a splendid farm of four hundred 
acres, all in a high state of cultivation, and especially well tiled — a large drain 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY • 243 

through the center and eight laterals — and with ample buildings. The house is 
one of the most complete farm homes in the county. Mr. Washburn is one of 
the directors of the First National Bank of Greenwich, Ohio. 

Although a republican in politics and an interested participant in public mat- 
ters, Mr. Washburn confines his attention to the needs of his own community, 
acting as township trustee and member of the board of education on occasion, 
and always being active in movements looking toward the advancement of his 
community in social and religious affairs. Being primarily a farmer, he has 
always taken an active interest in that which promised a bettering of the farm- 
er's condition. For that reason he has been an influential worker in the Grange 
and is firm in his conviction that said organization has brought about improved 
conditions. He is a charter member of Ripleyville Grange, No. 707, the first 
organized in that township, and is now a member of North Fairfield Grange, 
No. 806, Patrons of Husbandry, which he and his wife joined on its organiz- 
ation. He has held all of the local offices and is a member and overseer of the 
county grange. 

Daniel S. Washburn was married January 23, 1867, to Sarah Jane Mac- 
Omber, daughter of Egbert and Anna (Benedict) MacOmber. Her family 
came from Cayuga county, New York, in 1833, and were prominent in the de- 
velopment of this section. They, late in life, moved to Erie county, Ohio, where 
the father died in 1888, the mother surviving him some five years. Five chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Washburn: Anna Maude, wife of Lacey W. 
Robinson, a farmer of Ripley township; Ernest Linton, who is married and is 
operating the old farm; Inez, wife of Warren O. Smith, a farmer of Richland 
county; Wayne, now in the far west; and Leo, who, with Wayne, was in part- 
nership with his father on the farm. He is a graduate veterinary surgeon and 
for some time served as government meat inspector but resigned that position in 
the spring of 1909 and is now at home. 



F. P. MITCHELL. 



One of the prominent members of the farming community \>f Greenfield town- 
ship is F. P. Mitchell, who owns and operates a fine farm of one hundred and forty- 
two acres, on which he has made his home throughout life, his birth occurring here 
November 5, 1866. His father, Elias Mitchell, was born on the same farm Decem- 
ber 30, 1839, an d i s s tM hving, making his home in North Fairfield, Ohio. Our 
subject's paternal grandfather was William Mitchell, who was born January 1, 
1799, and came to this state from Canandaigua, New York, in 1820, locating in 
Greenwich township, Huron county. Here in the midst of the unbroken forest he 
cleared land and laid out the town of Greenwich, where he and his brother lived for 
about six years. They bought land there which they later gave to their father, 
James Mitchell, the great-grandfather of our subject, who continued to make his 
home in Greenwich until called to his final rest. He was a son of James Mitchell, 
Sr. A soldier of the Revolutionary war, he took part in the battle of Trenton and 
died when his son James was but nine years of age. After seeing that his parent? 



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244 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

were comfortably located in their new home in Greenwich, William Mitchell, our 
subject's grandfather, removed to Macksville, where he worked in the mill and dis- 
tillery of Ezra Smith, being a miller by trade. He spent seven years in that lo- 
cality and then came to Greenfield township, where he purchased a farm which at 
that time was covered with timber with the exception of two acres that had been 
cleared and a log house erected thereupon. He made that dwelling his home until a 
more substantial log house could be erected. He continued to reside upon this 
farm until i860, devoting his time to clear ing the land and cultivating the fields, 
and then returned to Macksville where he lived retired for some time. He died in 
Fairfield township in September, 1890, honored and respected by all who knew him. 
For several years he filled the office of township trustee and was a deacon of the 
Baptist church, both in Peru and Fairfield township, assisting in removing the 
church from the former township and donating the land upon which it was located. 

His son, Elias Mitchell, the father of F. P. Mitchell, has lived in Greenfield and 
Fairfield townships all his life, carrying on agriculture. He was born on the home 
farm December 30, 1839, and received his education in the district schools. He 
became one of the prominent citizens of this locality, served for eighteen years as 
a trustee of Fairfield township, held several offices in Greenfield township and was 
one of the directors of the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company of Huron county. 
He is at present living in North Fairfield, in comparative rest from toil. His wife, 
who in her maidenhood was Miss Cornelia Place, was born October 26, 1842, in 
New York city, but was very young when she came here with her mother and her 
step-father, in 1855. Her own father had died in 1847, and her mother married 
James L. Coit, Sr. To Mr. and Mrs. Elias Mitchell, have been born three children : 
Grant, who died at the age of one; F. P., the subject of this sketch; and Bertha, 
who died at the age of twenty-six, leaving a husband, Robert Reeder, of North 
Fairfield, and three children : Ray, Dana, deceased, and Nelson. 

F. P. Mitchell has always lived on his present farm, and in his youth, he at- 
tended the district schools, from which he gleaned such an education as they were 
able to impart during the few months they were in session and to lads who were 
compelled to give their first thought to the farm and its work. However, they 
would seem to have afforded a good training for life, for Mr. Mitchell has been 
very successful in the farming he has practiced and in the live stock business* 
he has carried on. He is also interested in the wool market. He has had other in- 
terests outside his farm, perhaps the principal one being in the schools. For a 
period of fifteen years, he served as a member of the board of education, is at 
present president of that body, and has held other offices within the gift of the 
people of his township. He is the secretary of the Farmers Mutual Insurance 
Company, a stockholder and one of the directors of the North Fairfield Savings 
Bank and of the North Fairfield Telephone Company, of which latter concern 
he is also treasurer. 

On the 21st of November, 1888, Mr. Mitchell wedded Miss Catherine Ryerson, 
a daughter of George M. and Catherine (Edsel) Ryerson, of Peru township. Mrs. 
Mitchell was born there, whither her parents had come from New York state in 
the early days. She was one of a family of nine children, the others being : Sarah, 
the wife of Charles H. Burg, of Patterson, New Jersey; Price V. and Edsel, of 
North Fairfield, Ohio; Esther, the wife of Adelbert S. Roe, of Peru township; 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 245 

George E., of Fairfield township; Catherine, the wife of our subject; Delno P., 
of Norwalk, Ohio ; Dora, the widow of F, M. Mitchell, and a resident of Columbus, 
Ohio ; and Grace, the wife of Henry T. Graham, of Fairfield township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mitchell have had three children : Donald, born January 2, 1894 ; C. Philip, 
born October 2, 1896; and Cornelia, born January 27, 1900. 

By hard and diligent labor, Mr. Mitchell has won success in his business opera- 
tions, and because of the strong qualities of his character, he has won the respect 
and confidence of his fellow citizens. He is one of the men who make for the pros- 
perity and stability of Greenfield township. 



WARREN SEVERANCE. 

A man versed in the laws of the country, as distinguished from the business 
man or politician, has been a recognized power for many years. He is depended 
upon to conserve the best and permanent interests of the whole people, and with- 
out him and his practical judgment, the efforts of the statesman and the industry 
of the business man and mechanic would prove futile. The reason is not far to 
seek, for the professional lawyer is never a creature of circumstances. The pro- 
fession is open to talent, and no definite prestige or success can be attained save 
by indomitable energy, perseverance, patience and strong mentality. One of the 
leading representatives of the bar of Huron county is Warren Severance, of Chi- 
cago, Ohio, who is a man of long and varied experience and deep learning. He 
was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, October 9, 1836, being a son of Elisha and 
Phebe B. (Tracy) Severance. 

Elisha Severance was born in Shelburn, Massachusetts, while his wife was born 
in Bridgewater, Vermont. He came to Ohio in 1819, locating at Milan, Erie 
county, where he lived for a number of years, later removing to Sandusky county, 
Ohio, and thence to Huron county, where he died October 13th, 1892. He first 
worked at his trade of coopering exclusively, but later, he began farming in the 
summer, confining his work at his trade to the winter. His first wife was Mar- 
tha Bangs, a daughter of Captain Bangs, who commanded a lake boat. She bore 
him one son, that lived to maturity, Samuel M. The second wife was Phebe B. 
Tracy and by this marriage, there were the following children : William M., War- 
ren, Byron, and one son that died in infancy. 

Warren Severance attended the Maxville school in Peru township, Samuel 
% F. Newman being one of his teachers. When he was twenty years old, he left 
school and like so many young men of his days who cherished ambitions, he began 
teaching. For nine years he continued as an educator in the schools of Huron 
county, but never relinquished his determination to enter the legal profession, 
and in J876 he was able to begin his law studies. In 1878, he was admitted to 
the bar and immediately thereafter located in Chicago, Ohio, which has been his 
home ever since, having firmly established himself in the confidence of the peo- 
ple. On March 16, 1896, Mr. Severance was admitted to the supreme court in 
Washington, D. C. 



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246 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Severance was married February 9, i860, to Philinda Shepard, a daughter 
of Israel and Nancy (Brown) Shepard, who were the parents of the following 
named children : Hannah, who married D. B. Kroh ; Mary, deceased, who mar- 
ried James McDuell ; Israel, also deceased ; Mrs. Severance ; Lucinda, who mar- 
ried J. Z. Woodworth ; and Eva, who married W. B. Keefer. Mr. and Mrs. Sev- 
erance became the parents of two children: E. W. ; and Clara M., who is the 
widow of C. A. Weatherford. Mr. Severance mourns the loss of his wife, who 
passed away May 10, 1904. 

He has been very prominent fraternally, and belongs to Chicago Lodge No. 
748, I. O. O. F., at Chicago, Ohio. He is local counsel for the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company, having held this position since 1891. While a republican, Mr. 
Severance has not sought public office. A consistent member of the Presbyterian 
church, he is much interested in its good work, and has been one of its elders since 
the establishment of the church in Chicago, also acting as one of the church trus- 
tees. For many years, he has practiced in all of the courts and has been con- 
nected with much of the legal business of his locality, his sound and ripe judg- 
ment, conservative views and thorough knowledge of his profession making him 
one of the best attorneys Huron county has ever possessed. 



R. M. CHERRY. 



One of the prosperous young farmers of Greenfield township is R. M. Cherry, 
who owns the one hundred and forty-five acres of land on which he makes his 
home. He was born in this township, September 29, 1873, and is a son of Eu- 
gene and Augusta (Turney) Cherry. The paternal grandfather, Reuben Cherry, 
was one of the old settlers of this county. He was reared and married in New 
York state, but in 1823 came to Ohio alone, settling at Hanvil's Corners, Fairfield 
township. After working here for a time, he returned home to get his wife, com- 
ing back to this state which he made his home until 1857, when typhoid fever 
caused his death. His widow, who before her marriage was Miss Brilla Snow, 
lived to be eighty-eight, and until 1893, the year of her death, made her home 
with her son Eugene, the youngest of her family of nine. Among the others were 
Eunice, who married M. Taylor, both now deceased; Eudolphia, the deceased 
wife of T. F. Hildreth ; and Lucinda, the widow of Philander Mitchell. 

Eugene Cherry, the father of R. M. Cherry, has spent all his life in this county. 
He was born March 20, 1846, in Fairfield township, and began his education in 
the old log school house there. He was not privileged however, to receive 
much of an education, for his father's early death compelled him to give all his 
time to the management of the farm. To the cultivation of the soil he devoted 
himself assiduously until 1905, when he removed to Norwalk to live in retirement 
and enjoy the fruits of his labor. His wife was born in Connecticut, but came at 
the age of thirteen to this state to live with an aunt. Later, Mrs. Cherry re- 
turned to her native home for a while as her father, Cyrus Turney, never became 
a resident of Ohio. Her mother had died when she was but a young girl. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Cherry were born three children: Jessie, at home; R. M., of this review; 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 247 

and Floyd, who married Miss Rose Sisinger and lives in Arizona, the father of 
one child, Carlton E. 

R. M. Cherry has always lived in this locality, and has worked on the farm 
from his boyhood. He attended the district school of the township, but could never 
be said to have received an education for wihen his father's health failed, as the re- 
sult of a sunstroke, he was compelled to give up his lessons and devote himself, 
mind and body, to the conduct of the farm. The hard work he has put into the 
field tell ; his crops are bountiful ; and the condition of the buildings shows that 
their owner is thrifty and a good manager. He has found by experience that his 
soil is best adapted to general farming and the progressive methods he employs 
bid fair to make him one of the most prosperous men of his township in a few 
years. 

On the 19th of April, 1905, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Cherry and 
Miss May Hartman, the daughter of William and Alice (Crebs) Hartman, of 
New London, Ohio. Mr. Hartman was born in Ashland county, Ohio, July 14, 
185 1, and his wife in Huntington county, Indiana, July 25, 1854. Both are still 
living. They had a family of five children : Ira ; Charles ; Nina, deceased ; May and 
Sylvia. 

Mr. Cherry is a member of the Methodist church of North Fairfield, is in regu- 
lar attendance at its services and contributes generously to its support. He is a 
member of the younger generation of farmers, to whom the township will look 
for her future prosperity and advancement, and her best expectations will not be 
disappointed, if we are to judge by the past years of Mr. Cherry's life. 



WILLIAM ERF. 



William Erf, devoting his time and energies to farming and dairy pursuits in 
Lyme township, is meeting with a substantial measure of success which entitle 
him to rank among the prosperous and progressive agriculturists of his town- 
ship. He was born in Peru township. Huron county, May 7, 1857, a son of Philip 
and Dorothea (Heymen) Erf, both natives of Germany. The father was born 
in Freien Dietz in 1821, where he was reared to the age of twenty years. Rumors 
had come to him concerning the superior opportunities for advancement offered 
in the new world and he decided to try his fortune on this side of the Atlantic. 
Consequently, he sailed for the United States and made his way direct to Huron 
county, Ohip, settling in Peru township, where he worked by the month for sev- 
eral years. When, by hard labor and careful saving, he had accumulated sufficient 
money, he purchased a few acres of land in that township and directed his ener- 
gies toward cultivating and expanding this property. As he prospered, he added 
td his holdings until at the time of his death, he had become the owner of two 
hundred and fifty acres in the home farm and about two hundred and fifty acres 
in other parts of the county. He was well known and esteemed in the community 
in which he lived and served for several years as trustee of Huron county. His 
death occurred in 1894, but his wife still survives him at the age of seventy years. 
In their family were four children : William, of this review ; Lydia, the deceased 



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248 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

wife of A. P. Horn ; Lewis ; and Oscar, the professor of agriculture at the Ohio 
State University at Columbus. 

William Erf has always made his home in Huron county, residing in Peru 
township until twenty-six years of age, while in the meantime, he attended the 
district schools of that township and also studied for a short time at Monroe- 
ville, Ridgefield township. Having been reared to agricultural pursuits, he wisely 
chose this as his life work and is now numbered among the prosperous and repre- 
sentative farmers of his county. The year 1883 witnessed his arrival in Lyme 
township, where he purchased his present farm of one hundred and fifty-three 
acres from his father in 1893. He has made many improvements upon the place, 
erecting a fine large residence and commodious and substantial barns and out- 
buildings. Aside from his farming interests, he is also proprietor of the Chestnut 
Ridge Dairy and this branch of his business is proving an important factor in 
his present success. He is president and director of the Star Creamery Company 
of Monroeville and is also a director of the Hess Hardware Company of that 
place. His business is conducted with keen discernment and is most carefully 
managed, so that he receives therefrom most gratifying returns. 

Mr. Erf was united in marriage March 8, 1883, to Miss Minnie A. Scheld, a 
daughter of Philip and Wilhelmina Scheld, natives of Germany. Her birth oc- 
curred in Peru township and she was the fifth in a family of six children, the 
others being: Bertha, Lewis, August, Amelia and Lydia. The union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Erf has been blessed with four children: Norma, Cora, Elzy and W. P., 
all at home. 

Mr. Erf is a member of the Evangelical church and his life at all times has 
been in keeping with its teachings. He has served as a member of the school 
board for some time and is at present clerk of the board, while at all times he is 
deeply and helpfully interested in all matters pertaining to the material, intellectual 
and moral welfare of the community. Mr. and Mrs. Erf are among the most 
highly respected and prosperous citizens in the community. 



F. WILLIAM BISHOP. 



F. William Bishop, who carries on general farming in Peru township, is 
one of the enterprising and progressive agriculturists of the community. He 
owns one hundred and twenty acres of rich farm land, and it was upon this 
place that he was born May 26, 1859. His parents were Arsineus and Tracy 
(Schaefer) Bishop. The father was born in Baden, Germany, and when a young 
man came to the United States, settling in Huron, Ohio, where he worked at 
the shoemaker's trade, which he had learned in Germany. He lived there until 
about 1845, when he bought the farm upon which our subject now makes his 
home. The improvements upon the place were of a very primitive character, 
consisting of a log house and log barn, and the land was nearly all covered 
with timber. With resolute spirit, such as was shown by the pioneers who 
faced the hardships and privations of frontier life, Mr. Bishop began clearing 
the place, cutting away the trees, grubbing up the stumps and clearing away 



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MR. AND MRS. F. WILLIAM BISHOP 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 251 

the brush until he transformed the land into productive fields. From time to 
time he made substantial improvements and his property became one of the 
excellent farms of the locality. At all times he was progressive in his citizen- 
ship and cooperated in many movements for the general good. He died in 
1884 at the age of seventy- two years and the community mourned the loss of 
one of its highly respected and worthy citizens. His wife in her girlhood days 
had come to Huron county with her parents, F. W. and Elizabeth Schaefer, 
and had settled at Monroeville about 1840. Subsequently they removed to 
Seneca county. Mrs. Bishop died in 1902 at the age of seventy-four years. 
By her marriage she has become the mother of six children: Frank J., now 
deceased; Elizabeth C, a resident of Crawford county, Ohio; F. William; 
J. R., who is also living in Crawford county; Maggie, deceased; and Alfred P., 
likewise a resident of Crawford county. The father had been married twice 
and by his former marriage had two children : Joseph, who died in the army ; 
and Thomas, who is living in Fairfield township. 

F. William Bishop spent his boyhood days in the usual manner of farm lads 
of the period and locality. He remained on the home place until twenty-six 
years of age and was then married, after which he removed to Auburn, In- 
diana, being employed in the shops at that place. He also worked along in- 
dustrial lines at Garrett, Indiana, securing a situation in the railroad shops at 
that point, and later he went to Fostoria, Ohio, where he was employed in the 
glass works. Subsequently he removed to Tiffin, Ohio, and worked in the Stove 
foundry for about eleven years. During that period his wife died and he re- 
turned to Huron county to take care of the farm and of his mother, remaining 
with her until her demise. 

Mr. Bishop had wedded Miss Helen Hipp, a daughter of Henry and Eliza- 
beth (Koppler) Hipp, of Seneca county, Ohio. The marriage was celebrated 
April 29, 1884, and they became the parents of four children: Fred V., Martin 
J., Isabelle F. and Linus D. Mrs. Bishop, who was born in Seneca county, 
Ohio, in June, 1858, died in Tiffin, Ohio, September 27, 1899, her remains 
being interred in St. Joseph cemetery at that place. Mr. Bishop is now living 
alone with his two sons and carries on general farming, working diligently and 
persistently to secure the success which is the merited reward of all honorable 
labor. He belongs to the Catholic church of Peru township, and is well known 
as a representative citizen of the community. 



ROBERT H. AND BUSHNELL R. REYNOLDS, M. D. 

Two of the highly esteemed physicians of Greenwich township are Drs. Rob- 
ert H. and Bushnell R. Reynolds, father and son. Not only are they able prac- 
titioners, but they are also public-spirited men, who have contributed their share 
to the advancement and progress of the community. Robert H. Reynolds was 
born April 25, 1846, in Greenwich township, in a house constructed for the greater 
part of walnut timber, that is still used for a dwelling, though it has been moved 



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252 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

to the village. He is the son of Dr. Henry and Harriet (Marble) Reynolds, both 
of whom were born and reared in the state of New York, the latter in Oswego 
county. Dr. Henry Reynolds was married in Cooperstown, New York. In 1839, 
he went to Tennessee, where he remained a year, and then came to Huron county, 
Ohio, taking up the practice of his profession, for which he had prepared him- 
self before leaving the state of his nativity. He was the father of nine children : 
Angeline, Russell N., Esther, Lavilla, Hannah, William B., Harriet E., Cornelia 
A. and Robert H., all of whom with the exception of Harriet E., who died in in- 
fancy, grew to maturity before he was called to his last resting place, at the age of 
seventy-eight. His wife had died six years before, in May, 1874, and but three 
of the large family now survives, Russell N., of Chicago Junction ; Cornelia, the 
widow of Julius H. Hulburt, of Plymouth, Huron county; and Dr. Robert H. 
Dr. Henry Reynolds was a man interested and active in public affairs. He was a 
republican in politics, was an ordained elder in the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and in the course of his long and busy life, was widely known and highly re- 
spected. 

Robert H. Reynolds was educated in the public schools of Greenwich town- 
ship, later attending the Maumee City Academy. He received his medical train- 
ing in the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, from which he was graduated 
in 1872, and he entered upon the practice of his profession almost immediately, 
coming to Greenwich township, which has been the scene of his labors continu- 
ously since, save for the year 1883, spent in Taylor county, Texas. He went there 
with the intention of establishing himself in profession, but the climatic condi- 
tions were so unfavorable, that he was compelled to return to Ohio. While his 
duties as a physician have kept Dr. Reynolds very busy, he has taken an active 
interest in public affairs and has found some time to give to the service of the 
public. At three distinct times, he acted as coroner for the county, was twelve 
years justice of the peace, and for the space of four years, was a member of the 
school board, of which he was president for a time. In politics, he is an ardent 
republican, and in 1900 was given the nomination for state senator from Huron, 
Erie, Ottawa and Sandusky counties. This is a strong democratic locality, but 
Dr. Reynolds reduced the majority of his opponent to something less than two 
hundred, which is a slight evidence of his strength before the people. 

On the 8th of July, 1873, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Reynolds to 
Miss Helen M. Washburn, the daughter of Charles A. and Mary E. (Griffin) 
Washburn. The families of both parents came to Ohio from New York, and the 
father had the distinction of having been the second white child born in Green- 
wich township. The mother, however, was seventeen years of age when her par- 
ents came here, and for two years before her marriage taught in the schools of the 
township. Both parents have now been dead for a number of years, but in the days 
of his activity, Mr. Washburn was a successful farmer and stock raiser. Dr. and 
Mrs. Reynolds have been blessed with a family of five children : James C, who 
died in infancy ; Bushnell R., a practicing physician of Greenwich ; Rhena H., de- 
ceased ; Glide A., a student at the Ohio State University ; and D. Chauncey, still 
in school and living at home. 

Dr. Reynolds belongs to several fraternal organizations, and others that are 
connected with his profession. He is a member of Greenwich Lodge, F. & A. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 253 

M. ; a charter member of the O. K. Lodge, Knights of Pythias ; Greenwich Lodge, 
No. 640, I. O. O. F. ; and with his wife belongs to the Eastern Star and the 
Daughters of Rebekah. In all of these societies he takes an active interest, and 
has frequently represented the different lodges at the grand meetings of organi- 
zations. He belongs to the Ohio State Eclectic Medical Association ; is president of 
the special board of pension examiners located at Chicago Junction. He is very 
active also on the county pension board, which aims to take care of the needy blind. 
In the councils of the republican party, he has played some part, having been a 
member of the republican county central committee and frequently a delegate to 
district county and state conventions. In matters of religion, he and his wife 
give their support to the Methodist Episcopal church, in whose work they are both 
sincerely interested. In short, Dr. Reynolds is a man of great public spirit, who 
favors public improvements, such as contribute to the credit and material prog- 
ress and comfort of the community, and has not been averse to doing his share to- 
ward bringing these things to pass. 

Bushnell Ray Reynolds, the son of Dr. Robert H. Reynolds, was born De- 
cember 1, 1875, in Greenwich village. He was graduated from the Greenwich 
high school in 1894 and from there went to the Ohio Wesleyan University in 
Delaware, remaining there two years. He then went to the Eclectic Medical In- 
stitute of Cincinnati and was graduated from that institution with the class of 
1899, entering the same year upon the practice of his profession in Greenwich. 
In the ten years that he has ministered to the physical wants of the people here, 
he has attained for himself a notable success and a high reputation; for not only 
is he endowed with the qualities of an able practitioner, but he also makes every 
effort to keep abreast of the advances made in his profession. He is a constant 
student by predilection, and in the winter of 1907-8, took a postgraduate course in 
the school from which he received training. Like his father, he is a republican and 
interested in public matters, though he has never sought an office at the disposal 
of the people. 

On the 28th of October, 1900, Dr. B. R. Reynolds married Miss Elleva F. 
Stewart, a daughter of Francis W. and Phoebe (Mann) Stewart, of Fairfield 
township. Her father was of Scotch descent, her grandfather, Daniel Stewart, 
having come from Scotland with his parents at the age of eight years. The lat- 
ter became famous as a lake captain and followed the lakes for a long period of 
years. He was a man of singularly powerful frame and robust constitution and 
was ninety-six years of age when he died, on the 6th of March, 1908. Francis W. 
Stewart was a farmer of Huron county and was well and widely known. He 
died December 29, 1898, and his wife two years later, dying on the 14th of Octo- 
ber, 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart had two daughters : Julia R., the wife of J. W. 
Muckley, a traveling salesman, who resides in the state of Washington ; and El- 
leva F., the wife of Dr. Reynolds. Mrs. Reynolds was for years one of the popu- 
lar teachers of the Greenwich schools and still retains her interest in the subject 
of public education. She has the distinction of having received her county cer- 
tificate at the age of fifteen and of having entered upon her vocation before she 
became sixteen. She is a woman of refinement and intellectual attainments, and 
under her leadership the Reynolds home has become a factor in the social and lit- 
erary life of the village. 



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254 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Dr. Bushnell R. Reynolds, like his father, belongs to several organizations 
He is a member of the Ohio State Eclectic Medical Association, and the Green- 
wich Lodge, No. 640, I. O. O. F., and the O. K. Lodge, K. P., of Greenwich 
include him in their membership roll. He also belongs to the Uniform Rank of 
Knights of Pythias, of Shelby, Ohio and with his wife is a member of the Daugh- 
ters of Rebekah. Another means of recreation in which Dr. Reynolds indulges, 
are fine horses and a day's hunting or fishing. He is a man of progressive spirit, 
deeply interested in the welfare of the community in which he lives, and is one 
who views matters from an optimistic standpoint, and the good will of the people 
toward him promises well for his future success. 



CHARLES W. MANAHAN. 

Few attain the ripe old age of Charles W. Manahan, who has now passed the 
ninety-sixth milestone on the journey of life. His former years of industry and 
activity have supplied him with a handsome competence, so that now in the even- 
ing of life, he can enjoy all the comforts to be obtained, while at the same time 
he commands the full respect and veneration of one of his years. Born in the 
Empire state, May 16, 1813, his parents were Thomas and Violetta (Silcox) 
Manahan, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of New York. 

Charles W. Manahan, when but twenty years of age, came to Ohio in the 
spring of 1833, this being then a frontier district. He addressed himself to the 
tasks which western life presented and with steadiness and courage met the prob- 
lems which confronted him. He first engaged in carpentering, but after a short 
time gave his attention to the manufacture of wagons and carriages on his own ac- 
count, when all such labor was then performed by hand. After about three 
years thus engaged, he sold out, taking wagons as payment, and these he traded 
for horses, which he took to his native county, Cayuga county, New York, where 
he disposed of them for cash. He then returned to the Buckeye state and dis- 
charged his indebtedness on farm land which he had contracted for and also made 
additional purchases, buying in all one hundred acres. While serving his appren- 
ticeship at Auburn, New York, he assisted in making the first threshing ma- 
chine ever made in the United States, and later he and his brother constructed 
three machines in Norwalk, two of which they sold, but abandoned the work on 
account of the labor required in its perfection. 

It was in 1849, that Mr. Manahan established a home of his own by his marriage 
to Miss Delana Wheeler, who was born in Massachusetts. Bringing his bride 
to Huron county, they began their domestic life in true pioneer style in a log 
shanty on his father's farm, his own newly acquired farm having as yet no build- 
ings thereon. His wife, though born of wealthy parents and leaving a comfor- 
table home in the east, proved herself a worthy helpmate to her husband and at 
once submitted to the privations necessary to assist him in establishing a good 
home on the frontier. Having previously worked for a year and a half at the 
carpenter's trade, he found this knowledge of the trade of material value in build- 
ing his own home, performing all the work from digging the cellar to plaster- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 25? 

ing and painting the house. After about three years, he disposed of his one hun- 
dred acre tract and purchased an improved farm. For three years, he there en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits and then, believing money could be made 
in the sheep industry, he began buying of his neighbors, selecting only the largest 
and best grades of animals, and in the fall of 1849, he had a flock of two hundred 
head, which he fed during the winter. In the following spring — 1850 — he shipped 
his sheep to New York city, where he disposed of them for eight hundred dollars 
and with this capital, he purchased a stock of goods and opened a general store 
in Olena. For twelve years, he was thus engaged, building up an extensive busi- 
ness in Olena and the surrounding country. He took in payment for his merchan- 
dise, butter, eggs, wool and various commodities, which he shipped to the city 
markets, where he secured cash for them. In the meantime he bought wool for 
a Boston manufacturer, his annual purchases amounting to between forty and 
fifty thousand pounds. He also built an ashery on his farm. He secured a team 
and a man, who visited the farmers and bought their ashes, trading for the same 
goods from the store. Mr. Manahan then converted the ashes into potash, which 
he shipped to the New York market. He also bought colts for from thirty to 
thirty-five dollars each and, putting them on his farm, kept them until they were 
about three years old, when he would sell them at a good profit and use the 
money to buy more land. In this way, he accumulated two hundred and thirty- 
three acres in one body, which cost him at an average of twenty dollars per acre 
and which he disposed of in 1865 at fifty dollars per acre. It was by these various 
methods that Mr. Manahan gained a good start in life and his success continued 
throughout his active connection with business interests. 

It was while busily engaged with his mercantile enterprise that Mr. Mana- 
han was appointed by the government as inspector of horses, with which to equip 
the First Ohio Cavalry, their headquarters being at Monroeville. During his 
four year's service, he bought and shipped more than one thousand head. At 
the expiration of that period, he turned his attention to buying and improving 
city property. His first purchase consisted of ten acres on West Main street in 
Norwalk, for which he paid two thousand dollars, while he spent an additional 
five hundred dollars in improving the same. He eventually disposed of a por- 
tion of this — the portion which had a frontage on Main street — for seven thous- 
and, five hundred dollars. Two years later, he sold one lot to Mr. Jackson, of 
Norwalk. In the meantime, Mr. Manahan took teams and went into the woods, 
digging up maple trees, which he transplanted in the streets of Norwalk, this being 
now one of the most beautiful residence district of the city. He also planted ever- 
green trees and other shrubbery on a lot, which he contemplated making a build- 
ing spot for his own home, but later abandoned the idea and disposed of the lot to 
W. W. Graham, which is his present place of abode. 

Eventually Mr. Manahan again engaged in business in Norwalk, becoming 
a member of the firm which conducted business under the name of Parker, Mana- 
han & Talier. His time was thus occupied for twelve years, when being then a 
man of seventy, Mr. Manahan decided to dispose of his interests and retire to 
private life. However, he could not content himself in idleness and purchased a 
tract of land in Norwalk, opened up a street, now known as Manahan avenue, 
and here he built eight houses and beautified the street by planting trees on each 



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256 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

side of the highway, which he himself had dug in the woods. He further im- 
proved his property by putting in gas and water, independent of the city sys- 
tem. He still owns this residence property, deriving therefrom a good rental. 
He likewise carries four thousand dollars in stock in the Chase piano factory, hav- 
ing been a director in the A. B. Chase Company for thirty-five years. 

Although he is now more than ninety-six years of age, he is still hale and 
hearty and manages his own business affairs, takes care of his garden, attends to 
all repairs made in his houses, and makes frequent trips on foot to the cemetery, 
a mile and a quarter distant, where his wife and two sons lie buried. In his family 
were three children, but Charles W., Jr., and William Kendall are both deceased. 
His daughter, Mrs. David W. Peckham, is now a widow and resides with him. 
A republican in politics, he still takes a deep interest in public affairs, and from 
1862 until 1866, he served as treasurer of Huron county. His religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Congregational church. He is also a member 
of the Firelands Historic Society. 

Mr. Manahan arrived in Huron county during its pioneer epoch and when he 
located here in 1833, he purchased fifty acres of land within six miles of where the 
enterprising and progressive city of Norwalk now stands for three dollars per 
acre, while his father, Thomas Manahan, bought two hundred acres in the same 
district at the same figure. Although he could not see in advance the full im- 
portance of the work which he was accomplishing, the result is today seen in the 
various sections of Norwalk which have been improved and beautified by his own 
hand, while the income which he now derives from his invested interests, supplies 
him with every needed comfort. Although he is now necessarily on the declining 
side of life, he bears his years well and no man in Norwalk and Huron county is 
held in higher esteem and regard than is Charles W. Manahan. 



EDWARD DENMAN. 



There is within the borders of Huron county hardly a man who has re- 
mained here as long as Mr. Denman, who for eighty-nine years has resided in 
this portion of the state. He has lived to see the pioneer log cabins replaced by 
commodious and substantial homes, the forests converted into rich fields, the 
wild animals supplanted by high grades of live stock, while churches, schools, 
libraries and other evidences of intellectual and moral culture are found on every 
hand. 

Edward Denman was born September 4, 1820, in Huron county, his parents 
being John and Miranda (Blackman) Denman. The father, a native of Eng- 
land, was born in the county of Kent, March 25, 1791, and when six years of 
age came to America with his parents, the family home being established in Sul- 
livan county, New York. He came to Ohio in 1816 as a young man with noth- 
ing but his ax as his capital. He possessed firm and determined purpose, how- 
ever,— qualities which enabled him to overcome the difficulties and obstacles of 
business life — and he met with undaunted courage the hardships and privations 
that come to those who locate on the frontier. The Blackman family had been 



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EDWARD DENMAN 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 259 

established in Ohio four years before. Traveling westward by wagon, they had 
settled in the midst of the green forest, where they had to clear a spot large 
enough on which to build a cabin. Thus they began life in the west, facing 
all the difficulties and dangers of pioneer life. John Denman used his ax to 
good advantage, cutting away the forest trees and working for different pioneers 
in the locality until he gradually accumulated enough money to enable him to 
enter a claim from the government. After a few years he married Miranda 
Blackman, who was a native of Niagara county, New York. They became the 
parents of nine sons and five daughters, Edward, William, John, Henry, Charles, 
Roxanna, Ann, Laura, Miranda, Mary P., Amos, Ambrose B. C, Martin and 
Leverett B. Of these seven are yet living, Edward, Henry, Martin, Leverett 
B., Amos, Laura and Mary. Edward is the only one who has retained his res- 
idence in this state. The father prospered in his undertaking as the years 
passed by and became a large landowner, his farms comprising about seven 
hundred acres. He was very active in the development of the county, contrib- 
uting in substantial measure to its growth and improvement and he was, more- 
over, a positive and leading spirit in matters pertaining to the public welfare. 
To his family he gave the best advantages that frontier life afforded and made 
liberal provision for his children. He was also a charitable man along the lines 
of practical giving to the worthy poor. He died at his home in Florence, Erie 
county, Ohio, March 23, 1878, and his wife passed away March 24, 1887, the 
remains of both being interred in the Birmingham cemetery. 

Edward Denman, whose name introduces this record, remained with his 
father upon the home farm until twenty-two years of age, and profited by such 
educational advantages as were at that time afforded in the neighborhood. The 
district school convened in a little log building for a few weeks each year and 
during that period Mr. Denman was instructed in the common branches of learn- 
ing. At the age of thirteen years he was capable of driving a two yoke ox-team 
in the logging camp and as his capacity for farm work increased it lessened his 
opportunity of attending school, his last term being when he was seventeen 
years of age. 

At the age of twenty-two he left the old home farm and began earning his 
living in the employ of others at thirty-seven and a half cents per day, or ten 
dollars per month. At the en<i of two years he determined to engaged in busi- 
ness for himself and rented a farm from his father on a cash basis. That year 
he harvested an immense hay crop, all cut in stumpy meadows with sickles and 
scythes, but he found that there was no market for the hay after he had had it 
stacked. He consequently bought several hundred sheep on credit — for he had 
little capital — that he might feed to them this hay through the winter, and by 
diligence, perseverance and hard work he met success in this undertaking and 
prospered from the start. The idea of paying rent, however, annoyed him and 
he determined to purchase a farm. Carrying out this resolution, he bought one 
hundred acres of timber land and contracted with some young men to clear 
thirty acres of this to be ready for fall wheat sowing. This was accomplished 
and from the thirty acres he threshed over six hundred bushels of wheat the 
following summer. The product was sold at a good price and with his wool 
clips and his increase in flocks he began to see success ahead. The second year 



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260 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

another thirty acres was cleared and put under cultivation and very soon more 
land was purchased and his acres broadened and his wealth increased. Those 
were the days in which ox-teams were exclusively used and part of a teamster's 
equipment was always an ax with which to cut away obstructions that might 
block the rude roads through the forests. Many discouragements beset the way 
of the early settler but Mr. Denman possessed a courageous spirit and firm pur- 
pose and, undaunted by the hardships and obstacles which he met, he persevered 
on his way until success attended his labors. 

When he had secured a farm of his own he felt that he was justified in tak- 
ing another important step in life and was married on the 13th of October, 1847, 
to Miss Jane Archer, a daughter of Joseph and Adeline (Kelley) Archer, both 
of whom were natives of New York city. In 1837 they arrived in Florence, 
in what was then Huron county, where the father engaged in farming, but he 
only lived a short time after coming to Ohio. His wife lived to the age of 
eighty years. Mr. and Mrs. Denman became the parents of six children : Joseph 
A., Adeline, John E., Jennie A., Annabelle and Louise, all living with the excep- 
tion of the last named. The mother, who was devoted to the welfare of her 
household and possessed many excellent traits of heart and mind, passed away 
June 15, 1895. 

The farm which Mr. Denman originally purchased was located on what is 
known as Butler road in Wakeman township. It was to that place that he 
brought his bride and they began housekeeping in a log cabin which he had 
already prepared. The dwelling, however, was rather pretentious for those 
times, with its plastered walls, good board floors, brick chimneys and a second 
story which was divided into bedrooms. The young couple started out happily 
and as the years passed Mr. Denman labored earnestly and perseveringly, add- 
ing to his acres from time to time. He engaged successfully in general farm- 
ing and took up sheepraising on an extensive scale, at times having a clip of 
wool that brought him as high as eighteen hundred dollars. His sheep were of 
the Delaine variety and of pure breed, some of his animals selling for high 
prices. He also bred and raised fine thoroughbred horses, which sold for a high 
figure, and was likewise a successful fruit grower, his orchards producing fine 
specimens of fruit that brought top prices on the market. On his farm the work 
of improvement was steadily carried on until it was all under a high state of 
cultivation and was probably the best improved property in the locality, his 
fields being most extensive and equal, if not superior, to all others in the quality 
of crops raised. In the fall of 1903 advancing age decided Mr. Denman to 
leave the farm and remove to a desirable location near the village of Wakeman, 
where he has erected a comfortable modern home and all conveniences and there 
he and his daughter Jennie reside, enjoying the comforts which a well spent and 
prosperous business life provides them. 

While always a busy man, Mr. Denman has yet found time to participate in 
public matters and though not an office seeker, he has been interested in the elec- 
tion of good men — those who will serve efficiently and well the interests of the 
community at large. In national and state politics he supports the republican 
party but at local elections he has voted for the men whom he regards best qual- 
ified for the office, without considering their party affiliations. He and his 
family have been members of the Methodist Episcopal church for many years 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 261 

and his entire life has been upright and honorable, in consistent harmony with 
his profession. He is a man of humane spirit, charitable, kindly and reliable, 
his many sterling traits of character winning for him the trust and honor of his 
fellowmen and enabling him also to wield a wide and beneficial influence in the 
community. Few men now living have a clear conception of what this county 
was seventy-five years ago nor of the self-denial, industry and undaunted dili- 
gence which was required to bring it to his present high standard of excellence 
and progressive development. Mr. Denman, however, has been familiar with 
the history of the county for eighty-nine years and relates in an interesting man- 
ner many of the incidents which shaped its history during its formative period. 



GREGORY JENNINGS. 



On the roll of Huron county's honored dead appears the name of Gregory 
Jennings, a man who in his life displayed many sterling traits of character and 
won many warm friendships. He was among the worthy citizens that New Eng- 
land furnished to Ohio, his birth having occurred* in Fairfield county, Connecti- 
cut, in 1832. His parents were Walter and Rhoda Jennings, who had a family of 
five children, namely: Gregory, Mary, Sarah, Ezra and Nelson. In 1835, when 
their son Gregory was a little lad of three years, they left their New England 
home and in the primitive methods of travel at that period made their way to 
Huron county, Ohio. Comparatively few settlements had been made within the 
borders of the county at that time and where are now seen richly cultivated fields 
at that time uncut forest stood, furnishing shelter for wild game and various kinds 
of wild animals. There were also seen evidences of Indian occupancy here al- 
though the red men had gone to hunting grounds farther west. With the work 
of development and improvement the Jennings family became closely associated as 
the years went by and Gregory Jennings, who was reared amid the wild scenes 
and environments of the frontier, shared with the family in all the hardships of 
pioneer life and also aided in the arduous task of developing a new farm. 

It was in the year 1860, that Gregory Jennings was united in marriage to Miss 
Amanda E. Keeler, who was born in Fairfield county, Connecticut, in 1839, her 
parents being Burr and Mary (Nash) Keeler. Her grandfather was Jonah Keeler 
and her great-grandfather, Matthew Keeler. Jonah Keeler was united in mar- 
riage to Rebecca Raymond and their children were: Burr, George, Raymond, 
Smith, Rufus, William, Charles, Zalmon and David. Of this family, Burr Keeler, 
the father of Mrs. Jennings, spent his youthful days in the Charter Oak state 
and having arrived at years of maturity, he wedded Mary Nash, a daughter of 
George and Esther Nash and a sister of Henry and Maria Nash. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Burr Keeler were born nine children : Rebecca, Amanda, Mary, Burr, George, 
Sylvester, Harriett, Louise and Julia. The Keeler family remained in Connecticut 
until 1857, when they came to Ohio and were associated with the early develop- 
ment of the county. 

Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Jennings took up their abode upon the 
farm in Huron county and throughout his remaining days, Mr. Jennings diligently 



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262 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

tilled the soil in the production of crops which proved a generous reward for his 
labor. In all of his business dealings, he was reliable as well as enterprising and 
thus made for himself an untarnished name. His political allegiance was given 
to the republican party and his religious faith was that of the Congregational 
church. He was ever loyal in the cause which he espoused and in community af- 
fairs manifested a public-spirited citizenship that made his cooperation much 
sought. He passed away in 1893, leaving to his family the priceless heritage 
of an untarnished name as well as a valuable farming property. Mrs. Jennings 
is also a member of the Congregational church and her life has been guided by 
its teachings. She is well known in Fairfield township and the hospitality of its 
best homes is freely accorded her. 



MRS. REBECCA PARK. 

Mrs. Rebecca Park, well known in Huron county, is the owner of a valuable 
farm property of two hundred and eighty-nine acres in Bronson township. She 
is the widow of Robert Park and was born in County Donegal, Ireland, near Lon- 
donderry, on the nth of April, 1838. She has, therefore, passed the seventy-first 
milestone on life's journey. Her parents were James and Martha (Calhoun) Park, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland and came to this country in 1847, settling 
at Savannah, Ashland county, where James Park followed the occupation of 
farming. The Parks were reared in Protestant Ireland and James Park was the 
son of Joseph and Rebecca (Torrence) Park, while his wife, Mrs. Martha Park, 
was a daughter of William and Ellen Calhoun. 

Mrs. Rebecca Park spent her girlhood days in her parents' home and was 
trained to the work of the household so that she was capable of managing a home 
of her own at the time of her marriage, on the 2d of March, 1859, to Robert 
Park, who died March 27, 1896. He was born November 26, 1829, and was a 
son of Joseph and Sarah (McAddo) Park, who were also natives of Ireland and 
on coming to the new world in 1847, located in Bronson township, Huron county, 
Ohio. Joseph Park was a son of Joseph and Rebecca (Torrence) Park. Two 
children were born unto Robert and Rebecca Park. Carrie, whose birth occurred 
in i860, is the wife of William Hall and resides in Huntington, West Virginia. 
They have two children: Percy and Park. Milton Park, born in 1863, is now a 
practicing physician located in Cleveland. He married Mrs. Catherine (Smead) 
Henry. 

From the time of his marriage until his death, Robert Park followed the occu- 
pation of farming and to the work of the fields devoted his energies with good suc- 
cess. He held membership in the Presbyterian church, in which he was an elder 
for many years. His political allegiance was given to the republican party, but 
though he never sought nor desired office, he was always loyal to the best interests 
of the community in which he lived and was a public spirited and valued citi- 
zen. His life in all of its relations was honorable and upright and his example 
may well serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement to others. Mrs. 
Park is also a member of the Presbyterian church and a most earnest and con- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 263 

sistent Christian woman. She has now lived on her present farm for twenty- 
three years and the place contains two hundred and eighty-nine acres of rich 
and valuable land which has been brought under a high state of cultivation and dis- 
plays all of the equipments and accessories of a model farm of the twentieth 
century. 



CHARLES ZEHNER. 



Charles Zehner, as vice-president and treasurer of the Zehner Brothers Pack- 
ing Company of Bellevue and Toledo, is manifesting in his business career the 
keen discernment and undaunted enterprise which result in the successful solu- 
tion of intricate and involved business problems. In his present connection, he is 
promoting one of the leading productive industries of his part of the state and the 
policy which he follows is one which makes his example worthy of emulation. 

One of the native sons of Bellevue, he was born August 26, 1859, of the mar- 
riage of Adam and Louisa (Heusner) Zehner, who were among the early settlers 
of this city. As the name indicates the family is of German origin. The father, 
who was born in Germany in 1814, there spent the first thirty years of his life and 
in 1844 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling first at Sandusky, where 
he conducted a tannery for about a year. At the end of that time, his plant was 
destroyed by fire and he removed to Bellevue, where he purchased the building in 
which his son Charles Zehner now carries on business. There he established a 
tannery, which he conducted until about 1872, when he retired from active busi- 
ness life to spend his remaining days in the enjoyment of well earned rest. His 
death occurred in 1888 and his wife died December 20, 1879. Unto him and his 
wife were born the following children : Christian, the eldest, died in 1882 at the age 
of thirty-two years. John, president of the Zehner Brothers Packing Company 
and living in Toledo, Ohio, was formerly one of the directors of the First National 
Bank of Bellevue and also served as a member of the town council while living 
here. He married Matilda Hepp and unto them have been born seven children : 
Adam, Theodore, deceased ; Huldah, Ernest, Albert and Edna and Edgar, twins ; 
Charles is the next member of the family. The other two died in infancy. 

Charles Zehner has always made his home in Bellevue and at the usual age, 
entered the public schools, wherein he mastered the branches of learning that 
qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. He made his initial step 
in the business world as an employe in his brother's meat market, being thus en- 
gaged from 1879 unt ^ 1881. I n ^ e l att er year, he was admitted to a partnership 
and they continued as retail merchants until 1890, when they began the packing 
business. They had established the new enterprise on a paying basis when, in 
*893, their plant was destroyed by fire. Not discouraged with this catastrophe, 
they at once rebuilt and in 1894, organized a stock company with about twenty 
stockholders, the business being capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars. The 
original officers were: John Zehner, president; Charles Zehner, vice-president 
and treasurer ; and I. R. Felker, secretary ; with J. H. Weber, Willis Vickery and 
Max Endle, as directors. The present officials are; John Zehner, president; 
Charles Zehner, vice-president and treasurer; L. P. Oehm, secretary; and I. N. 



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264 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Humphrey, assistant secretary and treasurer. These gentlemen are all members 
of the board of directors together with J. P. Ruffing, Martin Gross, J. W. Closs, 
I. A. Biehl, George Slessman, J. H. Becker, B. A. Becker, Julius Waldo, W. J. 
Kinker, Robert Villwalk, William Steiflol and Joseph Kest. The firm has had to 
increase its capitalization from time to time to take care of its rapidly growing 
business until now it is capitalized at seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 
From the beginning the business has proven a profitable venture for it was carefully 
organized and the work has been thoroughly systematized and the company gives 
to the purchasing public a just equivalent for money invested. The constantly 
extending reputation of the house has brought to them a growing trade and ren- 
ders this one of the important productive industries of Bellevue. Mr. Zehner 
also figures in business circles of Bellevue as one of the directors of the First 
National Bank. He purchased his brother John's shares in the institution and has 
since had voice in the managemnt of this sound financial concern. 

Mr. Zehner was married on the 28th of March, 1883, to Miss Flora Keller, 
a daughter of August and Ernestine (Wise) Keller, of Bellevue. They have two 
children: Carl C. and Louisa A. The former married Jennie Gazley and resides 
on the old family homestead. He is now associated with his father in business. 
The daughter is the wife of Walter Raish and also resides in Bellevue. 

Charles Zehner and his sons are members of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and since February 10, 1882, he has been connected with the Royal 
Arcanum. He is likewise a member of the German Aid Society, has been chairman 
of the finance committee of that organization for fifteen years and is in hearty 
sympathy with its purposes and its work. He also belongs to the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles and to the Lutheran church. His many substantial qualities have won 
him the favorable regard of those with whom business and social relations have 
brought him in contact. Having always resided in Bellevue, he is well known here, 
and his record is as an open book which all may read. The principles of sterling 
manhood are numbered among his chief characteristics, and his life history proves 
that success and an honorable name may be won simultaneously. 



JOHN BAUER. 



One of the successful agriculturists of New Haven township, Huron county, 
is John Bauer, who owns the one hundred acres of fine land on which he 
lives. He was born in Germany, September 27, 1858, and is the son of Henry 
and Margaret Bauer, who never left their native land, which was also the place 
of their death. Of their five children, however three came to this country and 
settled in Ohio. They are William, a resident of Milan, Ohio; Anthony, who 
lives in Ashland county, Ohio ; and John, of this review. Catherine is deceased " 
and one died in infancy. 

John Bauer was twenty-eight years of age when he came to the United States. 
He had received his education in the land of his birth and there had learned 
the trade of a furniture maker. When in 1887 he came to this country he 
made his way almost directly to Ohio, locating first at Norwalk, where he ob- 



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MR. AND MRS. JOHN BAUER 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 267 

tained employment on the railroad. After a year he took up farming, working 
for the different landholders of the neighborhood. He was a hard worker and 
an excellent manager, so that in a couple of years he had saved seventy-five 
dollars, which was sufficient, with his wife's help to buy forty acres of land in 
Ashland county. There he made his home for about eight years, reaping large 
harvests from his fields and practicing that sturdy economy that has been one 
reason for his prosperity. On selling the farm in Ashland county, he moved to 
New Haven township, Huron county, where in 1903, he purchased his present 
tract of land from William Childs. In the years it has been his home he has 
made a number of improvements, greatly increasing its value. The land is 
best adapted to general agricultural and yields generous returns for the hard 
work Mr. Bauer puts upon it. 

On the 4th of February, 1890, Mr. Bauer married Miss Augusta Kimball, 
who is a daughter of Philip and Caroline Kimball of New Haven township, and 
came here with her parents in February, 1886. Two sons have blessed Mr. and 
Mrs. Bauer's union: Carl, born January 11, 1891 ; and William, born Novem- 
ber 30, 1892. Both live at home and assist their father on the farm. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bauer are adherents of the Lutheran faith and attend the services of the 
church of that denomination at Chicago, Ohio, taking an active part in its work, 
social as well as religious. Though foreign born, Mr. Bauer has participated 
in the life of the township, and, being recognized as a good citizen and able man, 
was elected to the office of road supervisor. Lack of familiarity with the Eng- 
lish language, however, prevented his serving in this capacity, but he has the 
satisfaction of having received a palpable proof of the attitude of his neighbors 
toward him. 



SEBASTIAN B. LIEDORFF. 

No resident of Huron county is more deserving of the proud American title 
of a self-made man than is Sebastian B. Liedorff, who from the age of twelve years 
has been dependent entirely upon his own resources and through industry, energy 
and perseverance, has gained a foremost place among the substantial farmers of 
this county. He is, moreover, entitled to special mention in this volume from 
the fact that throughout the pericd of the Civil war, he served his country valiantly 
and bravely, the story of his military record reading like a romance, with its thrill- 
ing adventures and deeds of heroism. 

As the name indicates, Mr. Liedorff is of German origin, his birth having oc- 
curred in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, on the 6th of October, 1840. He is a son of 
Henry and Elizabeth Liedorff, also natives of the fatherland, where the mother's 
death occurred in the early 40s. In 1847, the father brought his family, which 
consisted of two sons and four daughters, our subject being the third in order of 
birth to America, settling first in Sandusky, Ohio. The father had followed the oc- 
cupation of a potter in his native country, but upon his arrival in the United States, 
he was variously employed at any honest labor which he found to do. He was a 
sturdy and honest German, whose force of character and excellent traits of man- 



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268 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

hood won for him the respect and esteem of his fellowmen and made him a valued 
citizen in any community. He passed away at his home in Erie county at the vener- 
able age of eighty-four years. 

Sebastian B. Liedorff was a little lad of seven years when he came with his 
father to America and he resided under the parental roof until twelve years old, at 
which early age, he left home to make his own way in the world and since that 
time he has been dependent entirely upon his own resources. He commenced his 
business career in the employ of N. C. Dildine, of Huron township, Erie county, 
a broom manufacturer, and in his home, Mr. Liedorff learned the broom-making 
trade. In return for his labor, he received six dollars per month and the oppor- 
tunity of attending school during the winter seasons, while he performed various 
tasks about the place in payment of his board. He resided with Mr. Dildine's 
family for three years, each year his wages being increased a dollar per month. 

When fifteen years of age, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
hiring as a farmhand to Thomas Hughes, a farmer of Huron township, Erie 
county, who paid him ten dollars per month. In the meantime, he had gained an 
excellent reputation throughout the community for he was energetic, industrious, 
willing and eager to do whatever was assigned him, while he was at all times 
actuated by a desire to succeed in the business world, and these characteristics 
made his services in constant demand. In the spring of 1861, he accepted a 
position with Mrs. Elizabeth Dale, a widow of Huron township, Erie county, as 
superintendent of her farm, receiving for his services thirteen dollars per month. 
The fact that he was called to responsible positions when not yet twenty years of 
age, is an indication that he not only proved capable and efficient in his work, but 
also perfectly reliable and trustworthy, enjoying the confidence of his em- 
ployers. 

In 1861, when the Civil war broke out Mr. Liedorff sought to enlist at the first 
call for troops, but was dissuaded, much against his will. When the second call 
came, however, he laid aside all personal and business considerations and on Sep- 
tember 4, 1861, enlisted as a member of Company A, Third Regiment, Ohio Vol- 
unteer Cavalry, serving until his term of enlistment expired. He then re-enlisted 
in the same company and regiment, serving until August 4, 1865, or until the close 
of hostilities. He entered the service as a private soldier, but his bravery and 
loyalty to duty won him promotion and he was mustered out with the rank of first 
duty sergeant. His regiment became a part of the Army of the Cumberland and en- 
gaged in all of the battles of that campaign. Mr. Liedorff participated in every 
battle where his regiment fought with the exception of the engagement at Perry- 
ville, when he was ill in the hospital at Nashville, having contracted typhoid fever. 
He won an excellent record for bravery and heroism and participated in many 
thrilling adventures. He was taken prisoner three different times, the first occa- 
sion being at the battle of Winchester, Tennessee, in August, 1863. He escaped 
however, and returned safely to his regiment. He was again taken prisoner at 
Pulaski, Tennessee, in September, 1863, and after about ten hours, together with 
some comrades, he again made his escape. His third capture occurred just after 
the battle of Stone River, while making a cavalry charge. He was wounded in 
the face and knocked from his horse, and then was taken prisoner by the enemy 
but was fortunate in again effecting an escape. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 269 

When his country no longer needed his services, Mr. Liedorff returned to 
Huron township, Erie county, on the 6th of August, 1865, and two days later again 
entered the employ of Mrs. Dale at a salary of one dollar per day. He was thus 
engaged for about a year, at the expiration of which period, he was employed by 
various people for about two years. Being desirous, however, that his efforts 
should more directly benefit himself, in 1867, he entered business on his own ac- 
count as a manufacturer of brooms at West Huron and was thus actively iden- 
tified with the industrial interests of that place for three years, or until his mar- 
riage, when, in connection with his broom-making, he also engaged in farming 
in West Huron. He continued to make that his place of residence for eleven 
years, and then, in 1883, he purchased a farm in Hartland township, Huron county, 
where he has since continued to reside. The farm consists of ninety-five acres of 
finely improved land, which is all under an excellent state of cultivation, to the 
operation of which Mr. Liedorff is directing his entire time and attention. 
Throughout his connection with agricultural interests, he has been very success- 
ful and now enjoys an abundance of this world's gciods. He has accumulated a 
handsome competency, but every dollar he has earned at the cost of indefatigable 
energy, frugality and economy. A man of unusual business ability, he has com- 
bined the sturdy qualities of the Teutonic race with the progressive and enter- 
prising traits of the American, with the result that he is today recognized as one 
of the foremost farmers and business men of his section of the county. In the 
midst of his farm, he has erected a fine residence, which is one of the best in the 
county. 

It was on the 14th of February, 1872 that Mr. Liedorff was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary A. Coles, a daughter of Isaac and Sarah Coles, residents 
of Sandusky, Ohio. Unto this union, have been born five children, namely : George 
S., a farmer of Hartland township; Henry J., following farming in the same 
township ; Burt L, a thresher of Hartland township ; Gus W., who is married and 
operates the home farm ; and Lillie, who passed away in infancy. There are also 
four grandsons and three granddaughters in the family. The sons are all pros^ 
perous farmers and are men highly esteemed throughout the community. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, Mr. Liedorff has been 
republican in politics, giving stanch allegiance to that party which was the sup- 
port of the nation in her darkest hour, and in his citizenship, he has ever been as 
loyal to her interests as when he followed the old flag on southern battlefields. He 
cast his first vote for John Brough for governor of Ohio in 1863, when in line of 
battle, and his first presidential ballot was cast in favor of Abraham Lincoln in 
1864 while a member of the Army of the Cumberland, stationed at Chattanooga, 
Tennessee. Since his first vote, he has supported every candidate for president 
and also for governor of Ohio on the republican ticket and although he has been 
deeply interested in the progress of the party, he has never been a politician in 
the sense of office seeking. He is a member of Townsend Post, No. 414, G. A. R., 
and has ever been active in the affairs of that body, having frequently served 
as delegate to various state and national encampments. With his old army com- 
rades, he delights in recalling the experiences and adventures which occurred dur- 
ing the Civil war, and he also has many interesting experiences to relate concern- 
ing his boyhood days. He often tells of how, before he left home, his first em- 



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270 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ployer paid him six cents a day for his labor, which consisted of dropping corn 
in the corn planting season, and in addition, he received his dinners and suppers. 
His has been a remarkable career, the salient characteristics of which have been in- 
domitable energy, unfaltering perseverance and strict integrity, and he stands 
today as a splendid example of the power and force of earnest effort, intelligently 
applied labor and honorable manhood. He has now reached the sixty-ninth mile- 
stone on life's journey, and he can look back over his past without regret and 
forward into the future without fear. 



ALMON B. WOOD. 



Almon B. Wood, a farmer of Greenfield township, Huron county, owns eighty- 
four acres of land on which he lives and two hundred and ten acres in another farm 
in the same township. He was born in this township, September 29, 1845, an( l IS 
the son of Lewis and Martha (Owen) Wood. The father was a son of Jonah 
Wood, a farmer of New York state, who had served in the American Revolu- 
tion. He was born in New York December 25th, 1800, and came to Ohio about 
the year 1833, tne days of the pioneers, bringing his wife and four young children 
with him. The little party made the journey to Huron, Ohio, by boat, and then 
with a team of horses crossed the country to Greenfield township. What few 
household effects they had were brought with them to this new land, where they 
were much needed though they had greatly impeded their progress through the 
wilderness. Arriving in Greenfield township, Mr. Wood purchased the two hun- 
dred and ten acres of land which his son now owns from Jeremiah Cole, paying 
ten dollars per acre, but as Mr. Wood did not have the full amount and labor 
would be accepted as part payment, he agreed to thresh four hundred bushels of 
wheat for Mr. Cole. This was not done in the simple manner of today, but by 
driving three-year-old colts back and forth over it, thus stamping out the grain 
from the husks. Having purchased his land, Mr. Wood began building a log 
house and barn, which were to be their buildings until better ones could be pro- 
vided, and it was not until 1838, that the frame house was completed which re- 
mained his home until his death. He also bought the smaller farm on which his 
son now lives from a Mr. Patterson. On the 1st of June, 1823, Mr. Wood mar- 
ried Miss Martha Owen, a native of New York state, who was born April 24, 
1802, and lived to see eighty-five years of activity pass over her head, her death 
occurring January 21, 1887, a little less than a year after the demise of her help- 
meet. In their family were nine children : Jane, deceased, who was born Novem- 
ber 24, 1823, and became the wife of Hiram Tooker; Samantha and Luantha, 
twins, who were born January 11, 1825, while the former passed away July 23, 
1892, and the latter became the wife of Ransom Mather, who died April 18, 1855 ; 
Halsy, who was born November 30, 1828, and died May 14, 1831 ; Mary, born 
May 23, 1832. who became the wife of George Dean, and died February 10, 1859; 
Jeremiah C, deceased, born January 10, 1834 ; Hannah S., who was born January 
18, 1838, married Joseph Randall, and died September 2, 1907; Halsy, who was 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 271 

born November 18, 1840, and died October 12, 1843; ^d Almon B., of this 
review. 

Almon B. Wood has spent all his life in Greenfield township, having been 
reared on the farm and receiving his early education of the district schools, while 
for one winter he attended Oberlin College. In 1865, at a call for troops he en- 
listed in Company D of the One Hundred and Ninety-first Regiment of the Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. The company was mustered in at Sandusky and sent to 
Camp Chase, Columbus, where Mr. Wood contracted the measles. Thus the time 
he might have spent in active service was of necessity passed in the hospi- 
tal, and when he had sufficiently recovered to be returned home he was mustered 
out of the army. After this brief experience, he took up farming and identified 
himself with the affairs of the township, becoming in the subsequent years not 
only very prosperous, but also well known and highly respected by all with whom 
he has come in contact. He is commonly called "Bud Wood" and the familiarity 
of this cognomen bears evidence to the good will of his neighbors. 

On the 6th of October, 1887, Mr. Wood married Miss Frances B. Graham, 
a daughter of Alexander and Mary (McCammon) Graham, of Greenfield town- 
ship. Mr. Graham was born in Ireland in 1810 and at the age of eighteen came to 
this country with his parents. They settled in % Huron county which remained Mr. 
Graham's home until his death. His wife, whom he married October 25, 1832, 
was born in Pennsylvania, April 22, 1813, and lived until February 11, 1899, hav- 
ing reared the following children : Alex, who passed away June 2, 1887 ; John, de- 
ceased; Samuel, deceased; Eliza; Martha; Mollie; Robinson; Jennie; George; 
William ; Frances B. ; Ida ; and Charles. To Mr. and Mrs. Wood have been born 
five children: Glenn A., born June 12, 1890; Hazel B., born October 5, 1891 ; Ber- 
nice M., born September 14, 1893 5 Martha G., born June 9, 1895 ; and one who 
died in infancy. Mrs. Wood is a member of the Congregational church of Steu- 
ben, Ohio, and is active in its work. 

Mr. Wood affiliates politically with the democratic party and served as con- 
stable for one term. He is a man of education and of wide interests, blessed with 
the capacity of making and retaining a large number of friends. Those who 
know him are unanimous in their admiration of him and do not begrudge him the 
success which has made possible his retirement from the active pursuit of farming. 



CHARLES E. PARMELEE. 

Charles E. Parmelee, a well known and successful farmer and dairyman 
of Ridgefield township, where he owns an excellent farm of eighty-six acres, was 
born at Kent, Portage county, Ohio, on the 4th of April, 1850, his parents being 
John F. and Mary E. (Tilton) Parmelee. The father passed away at Kent in 
the year 1855, leaving a family of three children, namely: Charles E., of this re- 
view; Frank, who is now deceased; and George. When our subject was about 
eleven years of age the mother was again married, her second union being with 
Allen B. Lindsley, of Huron county, who brought the family to his farm in Ridge- 



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272 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

field township. The demise of Mr. Lindsley occurred in June, 1877, but his 
widow still survives, making her home with her son, Charles E. 

The gentleman whose name initiates this review obtained his education in the 
district schools and since putting aside his text-books has given his attention to the 
pursuits of farming and dairying. With the exception of thirteen years, he has 
made his home on the farm where he resides from the age of eleven years and the 
property is now in his possession. It is a rich and productive tract of land compris- 
ing eighty-six acres and in addition to cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil 
and climate, he also conducts the Forest Grove Dairy, owning a large number of 
fine cattle. In all of his business affairs, he is alert and enterprising, meeting with 
the measure of success which always rewards earnest, persistent and well di- 
rected labor. His wife is the owner of a farm of one hundred and thirteen and a 
half acres in Hartland township. In March, 1877, he removed to that township, 
where he made his home until 1885, and then on account of ill health, he gave 
up farming for a time and resided in New London, but in 1890, he returned to 
the farm which is his home at the present time. 

On the 1st of January, 1877, Mr. Parmelee was united in marriage to Miss 
Harriett E. Brightman, a daughter of Pardon B. and Lucretia (Jones) Bright- 
man, of Sherman township, this county. Unto them have been born two children, 
as follows: Nellie, who gave her hand in marriage to James W. Candler; and 
Mildred P., who is attending school. Mr. Parmelee is a valued member of the 
Congregational church and his many sterling traits of character have won him 
an extensive circle of friends throughout the community where he has now resided 
for almost a half century. 



EPHRAIM ALFORD SMEDLEY, M. D. 

Dr. Ephraim Alford Smedley, a successful and well known representative of the 
medical fraternity in Huron county, has continuously practiced his profession 
in North Fairfield since the fall of 1883. He is a native of Brewerton, New 
York, his birth having there occurred on the 12th of October, 1857. His pa- 
ternal grandparents, Dr. Chester and Ann (Landon) Smedley, were both na- 
tives of Connecticut. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Daniel 
Light. Lindorf Smedley, the father of Dr. E. A. Smedley, was born in Litch- 
field, Connecticut, on the 12th of September, 1823, and when three years of 
age was taken by his parents to Brewerton, New York. On the 29th of Oc- 
tober, 1856, in Madison county, that state, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Catherine Light. In 1867 he came to Huron county, Ohio, taking up his 
abode at Townsend on the 20th of March of that year. Here he was success- 
fully identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his remaining days, 
being widely recognized throughout the community as a most substantial and 
respected citizen. It was on the 12th of February, 1903, that he was called to 
his final rest. Unto him and his wife were born the following children: Eph- 
raim Alford, Chester D., Abbey C and James, all natives of Brewerton, New 
York. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 275 

Dr. E. A. Smedley obtained his preliminary education in the common schools 
of this county and subsequently entered the Ohio Normal University at Ada, 
pursuing his studies there during the years 1875, ^76 and 1877. Having 
determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he then entered the 
Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which institution he received 
his degree of M. D. in 1883. In the fall of the same year he located for prac- 
tice at North Fairfield, where he has since remained as an active and successful 
representative of his chosen calling, enjoying a lucrative and constantly growing 
patronage. 

On the nth of August, 1885, Dr. Smedley was united in marriage to Miss 
Idalia Whitney, whose birth occurred in East Townsend, Huron county, Ohio, 
on the 5th of May, 1856. Her parents, Charles and Roxanna (Palmer) Whit- 
ney, were natives of Wilton, Connecticut, and China, New York, respectively, 
the former born on the 23d of September, 1812, and the latter on November 
12, 1816. Their children were six in number, as follows: Idalia, now Mrs. 
Smedley ; Palmer ; Ann ; Calvin ; John L. ; and Richard B. The paternal grand- 
parents of Mrs. Smedley were Henry and Lucy (Grummond) Whitney, na- 
tives of Connecticut. Their children were as follows: Henry Fitch, Charles, 
William, Sally Ann, Esther, Hannah, Jeremiah, John, Lucretia and George. 
The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Smedley were Lory and Elizabeth (La 
Mott) Palmer, natives of the Empire state, who reared the following children: 
John, Mary Ann, Sarah and Roxanna. Dr. and Mrs. Smedley have two chil- 
dren, namely: Roxanna Palmer, whose birth occurred November 15, 1886, and 
who is now in the Lakeside Training School for Nurses at Cleveland, Ohio; 
and Karl Lindorf, whose natal day was February 23, 1895. 

Dr. Smedley is now serving as health officer of Fairfield township. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. His 
life has been actuated at all times by high and honorable principles, manifested 
in his professional labors and in his private life. Anything which tends to 
bring to man the key to that complex mystery which we call life is of interest 
to him, and he has been a close and discriminating student of the science of 
medicine, realizing fully the obligations that devolve upon him in the practice 
of his chosen calling. 



BENJAMIN BARNES. 



Benjamin Barnes, who has been connected with railroad business for more 
than thirty years, has, during that time, gained a most creditable record for him- 
self and is numbered among the well known and prominent citizens of this com- 
munity. One of Ohio's native sons, he was born on the 8th of July, 1855, a son 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Fields) Barnes. The family has long been represented 
in this country, members of the name having come from England, in the early part 
of the seventeenth century. 

The father of our subject, who was born in 1796, was a native of Virginia and 
came to Ohio from the District of Columbia in 1828. He was a painter and glazier 



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276 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

by trade and served as a soldier in the War of 1812, assisting in the defense of the 
capitol and, after its destruction, aided in its reconstruction along the line of his 
trade. After his removal to Columbus, Ohio, however, he was identified with the 
butchering business, being thus engaged until 1856, in which year he removed with 
his family to Wakeman, where he operated a mill for a short time. He again 
entered the butchering business and was thus connected until his death, which 
occurred in August, 1874. A man of strong convictions, he based his opinions upon 
his own judgment rather than upon what others thought and, while he possessed 
a most positive disposition, he nevertheless was quick to forgive when proper 
apology was offered. He was married twice, Miss Elizabeth Fields becoming his 
second wife. She passed away July 3, 1905, and they were both laid to rest in 
the Wakeman cemetery. In their family were seven children, namely: Nimia, 
Morris P., Benjamin, Robert, Alice, Albert and Anna, the last two passing away 
in infancy while the other five still survive. 

Benjamin Barnes, whose name introduces this sketch, was reared under the 
parental roof and attended the schools of Wakeman in the acquirement of an 
education. He remained at home until twenty years of age, in the meantime 
assisting his father in the butchering business. In 1876, he entered the railroad 
service and has been engaged in this line of work to the present time. He en- 
tered the employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad in 1879, an ^ 
has been connected with that company for thirty years, operating on the Cleve- 
land & Toledo division. He has been eminently successful in his relations with 
railroad business, being promoted from one position to another until he is today 
serving as passenger conductor, having acted in that capacity since 1890. Through- 
out his entire connection with the railroad, he has been most careful and has never 
had a wreck, has never been seriously injured and none of his crews has ever been 
injured, a record which is indeed most unusual. 

Mr. Barnes was united in marriage on the 29th of November, 1874, to Miss 
Sarah M. Flower, a daughter of Isaac and Ann (Stratton) Flower, natives of 
England. Upon coming to America in 1851, her parents settled in Oswego, New 
York, where they remained for one year, and then, continuing their westward 
journey, located at Cooks Corners, in Huron county, in 1852. In 1856, they re>- 
moved to Clarksfield, four years later to East Townsend and in 1865 came to 
Wakeman. They resided here until 1870, when they removed to Missouri, where 
they remained two years, returning to Wakeman in 1872. Throughout these years 
Mr. Flower had been engaged in the harness business, being a manufacturer and 
dealer, but in 1874, he became identified with the hotel business in this city, being 
thus connected until 1894. In the latter year, he retired from active life while 
his demise occurred on the 13th of January, 1903, when he had reached the ven- 
erable age of ninety-three years. His wife had passed away December 8, 1896. 
In their family were five children, Emma, Alfred, Anna, Sarah and Frederick, 
all of whom survive with the exception of Anna, who died in infancy. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Barnes has been blessed with one son and one 
daughter, William O. and Lulu May. The latter is now the wife of James I. Sey- 
bert, of this city, and they have one son, Howard Benjamin. William O. Barnes 
is also married and lives in Toledo. He has followed in his father's footsteps and 
is a conductor on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 277 

Mr. Barnes is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in Gibson 
Lodge, No. 301, F. & A. M., and belongs to Webb Chapter, R. A. M., of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, while he has taken the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in 
Masonry. He likewise is a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. He is 
a stalwart champion of the democracy and in former years has been very active 
and influential in local politics, having frequently represented his party as a dele- 
gate at various district, county and state conventions. He is intensely loyal and 
public spirited in his citizenship, aiding in all movements and measures which have 
for their object the substantial and permanent upbuilding and improvement of the 
community. He is a great athlete, enthusiastic in the matter of outdoor sports and 
takes especial delight in fishing and hunting, frequently enjoying, in the company 
of other kindred spirits, a ten-days' trip into the woods and along the streams in 
the pursuit of his favorite pastimes. As a young man, he was particu- 
larly fond of baseball and yet maintains a keen interest in this national game, 
possessing considerable skill himself in this line and often joining in games with 
local teams. The Barnes home is modern and attractive in its architecture and 
surroundings and is a favorite resort with a host of friends to whom its cordial 
hospitality is freely extended. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes are genial, companionable 
people, who not only understand how to enjoy life themselves, but possess the happy 
faculty of making others enjoy it also, the influence and good fellowship of their 
home being a potent factor in the social circles of the community. 



WILLIAM H. KIEFER. 

William H. Kiefer is well known not only in Norwalk, but in the surround- 
ing country as well, having been engaged in the undertaking business here since 
1897. He is a native son of this city, his birth having here occurred May 2, 1874. 
His father, Robert Kiefer, was born in Germany and when a young man emi- 
grated to the United States in 1869. He at once made his way to Norwalk and 
engaged in the undertaking and furniture business, continuing in the same until 
his death, which occurred in 1889. His wife, Mrs. Mary Kiefer, then succeeded 
to the business, the fitm name being M. Kiefer, and thus continuing until 1896, 
when the establishment was destroyed by fire. 

After leaving school, William H. Kiefer was employed in the undertaking de- 
partment of his mother's business, becoming thoroughly trained in that line of 
work, and was ready to take charge of the business on his own account after the 
fire in 1896. He then opened an undertaking establishment and has thus been iden- 
tified with the business interests cf the city to the present time. He is a graduate 
in embalming of four different colleges and was the first to advocate the law re- 
quiring an examination for embalmers. He is a charter member of the National 
Association of Embalmers, which was organized in 1896, and it was through the 
efforts of this society, that a state board was appointed for examination of em- 
balmers. Interested in everything that tends to promote his knowledge of the 
business to which he is devoting his attention, Mr. Kiefer today stands among 
the foremost undertakers, not only in his home city but throughout the state of 



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278 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Ohio, and he has secured a very large and lucrative patronage, his services being 
in demand throughout a vast section. 

Mr. Kiefer is also a prominent figure in the public affairs, being an ardent 
supporter of the democratic party. He served on the city council four years, being 
the youngest member of that body. He has also for the past six years been chief 
deputy of the Huron county board of supervisors of election, while for several 
years he has served on both county, central and city committees. He is regarded 
as a leader in democratic circles and his opinions carry weight and influence among 
his fellow citizens. 

Equally prominent in fraternal circles, Mr. Kiefer was one of the organizers 
of the Knights of Columbus in Norwalk, of which he is a member, and he also 
holds membership with the Catholic Order of Foresters, of which he has been chief 
for the past eight years. He is also identified with the Elks, the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Concordia Society. 
Courteous and affable, he is popular among a wide circle of friends, while as a 
funeral director, he has won a wide reputation. 



WILLIAM B. McCULLOW. 

William B. McCullow, the mayor of Greenwich village who has engineered 
many of the noticeable municipal improvements here, was born February 22, 
1870, in Fairfield township, and is the son of Joseph Edward and Lucena (Baker) 
McCullow. The mother was born in Huron county, Ohio, but the father's birth- 
place was Tuckerton, New Jersey, though he was only four years old when 
brought by his parents to Ohio, in 1830. His father was a farmer and became 
prominent and influential in the community in which he lived. Joseph Edward 
McCullow also followed the life of a farmer and besides owning the old home- 
stead, acquired considerable property in Greenwich village. He was a man active 
in local affairs and filled many of the offices of township and village with distinc- 
tion, winning for himself a reputation for sterling integrity. The had a family 
of two sons, Charles and William B., both of whom are living, the former being 
a merchant in Greenwich. On the 1st of April, 1901, he completed his earthly 
course, and his widow, who resides in Greenwich, still survives him. 

As the family became residents of Greenwich village in 1877, William B. Mc- 
Cullow received his education in the schools there, though he was prevented 
from graduation by ill health. Upon leaving school, he clerked for his brother 
Charles in a clothing store for a period of seven years, at the end of which time 
he took up the trade of watch and clock repairing and investigated the jewelry 
business. In 1898, he engaged in the latter for himself, succeeding W. B. Burt, 
of Greenwich, and also offered his services as a graduate optician, for he had 
completed the requisite course at the South Bend College of Optics. His stock 
of jewelry is both large and in good taste, comparing very favorably with that 
of the best firms in larger towns, and in his business dealings has been found 
both honorable and desirous of satisfying his customers. Besides being a good 
man of affairs, he is also a public-spirited citizen, and has, among other things, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 279* 

been instrumental in establishing several of the flourishing industries of the 
community. 

In politics, Mr. McCullow is a republican and is an active representative of the 
party. For a period of seven years, he served as clerk of the village, and the record 
of his work was so satisfactory, that in 1907, he was the people's choice for mayor, 
an office he holds to the present. His administration has been active in promoting 
public improvements of a substantial kind, in establishing a sewerage system and 
in inaugurating street paving, which, by the close of 1909, will extend through 
a full mile of the village streets, and in advancing other matters that make for 
the material prosperity of the village. 

On the 29th of March, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. McCullow 
and Miss Felicia Mary Kraft, a daughter of John and Barbara Mary (Bauer) 
Kraft, of Galion, Ohio. Mr. Kraft was a retired business man of that city and never 
became a resident of Huron county. To Mr. and Mrs. McCullow was born one 
child, who did not survive the period of infancy. 

In the O. K. Lodge, No. 616, of the Knights of Pythias, Mr. McCullow is an 
ardent worker, and in it has filled most of the chairs. He is a popular man who 
makes friends easily and is present at most of the lodge meetings. His principal 
relaxation from the cares of business and administration, however, is obtained in 
the enjoyment of a day's hunting and fishing, when opportunity affords, but he is 
not a faddist ; on the contrary an enterprising business man and an able executive, 
fully imbued with the spirit of public progress, which he does all in his power 
to promote, realizing that a community must keep abreast of the time, or else slip 
to one side and be wholly engulfed in the world struggle. Under the wise guid- 
ance of Mrs. McCullow, who by the way is a member of the German Reformed 
church, devoted to the performance of good works, and a member of the Twen- 
tieth Century Reading Club, the McCullow home occupies a prominent place in the 
social and intellectual life of the village. A woman of culture and refinement, 
she is an able assistant to her husband and is fully in sympathy with his plans for 
the advancement of the community. 



OLIVER O. UNDERWOOD. 

Oliver O. Underwood, numbered among the active and prosperous farmers 
of Fairfield township, owns and cultivates one hundred acres of rich and produc- 
tive land, which is now highly improved in accordance with the most modern 
methods of farming. His entire life has been passed in Huron county, for he is 
one of the native sons, his birth having occurred in Greenwich township, January 
14, 1862. He represents one of the old families of this part of the state, his 
parents being Levi and Catherine (McCullough) Underwood, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania. Their family numbered three sons and two daughters : Oliver, 
James, Charles, Ola and Eva. 

In the usual manner of farm lads Oliver O. Underwood spent his youthful days. 
As soon as old enough to handle the plow, he took his place in the fields and was 
there busily employed from early spring planting until crops were harvested in 



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280 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

the late autumn. He was thus carefully trained in the occupation which he has 
made his life work. In early manhood, he also learned the carpenter's trade and 
engaged in that pursuit for a time but gives his entire attention to farming at 
present. His educational privileges were those afforded by the public schools 
and reading and observation have also largely broadened his knowledge. 

On the 24th of December, 1887, Mr. Underwood was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna Gibson, who was born in Greenwich township, June 13, 1866, and is a 
daughter of Jerome and Hulda (Healy) Gibson. The father was born in 1840 
and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gibson, whose other children were : Mary, 
Edward, Lena and Isaac. Having arrived at years of maturity, Jerome Gibson 
wedded Hulda Healy, whose birth occurred in 1843. She was one of the children 
of Jacob and Anna (Brooks) Healy, and her sisters are Edith, Elizabeth and Sarah. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gibson there were born three daughters and two sons : 
Anna, Samuel, Carrie, Fletcher and Jennie. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Under- 
wood has been blessed with nine children: Clinton, Harry, Arlie, Ruth, Hulda, 
Eva, Blanche, Charlie and Ralph. The family home is on a farm of one hundred 
acres in Fairfield township, which is the property of Mr. Underwood. There are 
good buildings upon the place, furnishing ample shelter to grain and stock and 
these are surrounded by well tilled fields. The latest improved machinery is used 
in carrying on the work of the farm and the entire property presents a neat and 
attractive appearance. Mr. Underwood gives his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party and keeps well informed concerning the leading questions and issues 
of the day, but the honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him, as 
he prefers to give his undivided attention to his business affairs. In their capable 
management, he is meeting with success and providing his family with many of 
the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 



RUNDELL BEECHER PALMER. 

Rundell Beecher Palmer, well known as one of the progressive, prosperous 
and representative agriculturists of Huron county, owning five hundred acres of 
valuable land, was born August 28, 1832, in Fitchville, Ohio. He represents one 
of the oldest New England families. The Fortune which sailed for America soon 
after the arrival of the Mayflower numbered among its passengers the first Pal- 
mer in this country, and the family became connected by marriage with the Pil- 
grims who sailed on the Mayflower in 1620. It was in 1621 that (1) William Pal- 
mer left Noddinghamshire, and on the Fortune crossed the Atlantic to Salem, Mas* 
sachusetts. He afterward lived at Plymouth and Duxbury, Massachusetts. (2) 
Walter Palmer, who also came from England, landed at Salem in 1629. He went 
to Charlestown, afterward to Rehobeth, Massachusetts, and finally to Pawcatuck, 
now Stonington, Connecticut. His descendants are largely found in Connecticut 
and New York. (3) Abraham Palmer sailed from England in 1628 and landed at 
Salem, Massachusetts, but afterward removed to Barbadoes. (4) Thomas Palmer, 
in the vessel Expectation from Ipswich, England, landed on American shores in 
1635. He resided at Boston and at Bowby, Massachusetts, and one branch of his 



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Rt'XDELL B. PALMER 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 283 

descent are found at Norwich, New London county, Connecticut. (5) William 
Palmer, of Newburg, was made a freeman in 1638. He settled at Hampton, New 
Hampshire, and his descendants are found throughout New England and New 
York. (6) John Palmer sailed as a passenger on the Elizabeth in 1634 and settled 
at Hingham, Massachusetts. (7) Lieutenant William Palmer, who was made a 
freeman at Varmouth, Massachusetts, July 7, 1636, settled at Long Island. (8) 
William Palmer went to Virginia and his descendants are scattered throughout the 
south. The Palmers of the present day are principally descended from Walter 
Palmer (2), Thomas Palmer (4), and William Palmer (5). Walter Palmer, born 
in 1598, married Rebecca Short and their children were: John, Grace, Jonas, Wil- 
liam, Hannah, Elihu, Nehemiah, Moses, Benjamin, Gresham, Rebecca and Eliza- 
beth. Of this family Nehemiah Palmer married Hannah Stanton and their children 
were : Lieutenant Joseph, Elihu, Jonathan, Daniel, Nehemiah and Hannah. Of these 
Lieutenant Joseph Palmer married Frances Prentice and their children were : Dea- 
con Joseph, Hannah, Benjamin, Sarah and Jonathan. The first named, Deacon 
Joseph Palmer, wedded Mary Palmer and their children were : Sarah, Mary, Jo- 
seph, Francis, Amos, Moses^, Hannah and Phoebe. The eldest son, Joseph Palmer, 
married Catharine Coats and to them were born : Joseph, William, Phoebe, Cap- 
tain Amos, Elijah, Elisha, Jonathan, Hannah, Benjamin, David and Thomas. Of 
these Elijah Palmer married Lucretia Palmer and for his second wife a Miss 
Powell. His children were: Gresham, Doley, Rebecca, Phoebe, Joseph, Elisha, 
Lydia, Benjamin, Jesse and Hulda. Hulda Palmer married Stephen Palmer and 
their children were: Charles H., Lucretia, Sylvanus B., William L., Noves G., 
Henrietta, Marietta, Andrew, Priscilla, Martin, George W. and John Jay. 

At present it is impossible to trace the ancestry down from Hulda Palmer to 
Seeley Palmer, the father of our subject. He was born in Greenwich, Connecticut, 
November 24, 1797, and grew to manhood in that state, there learning the car- 
penter's trade under Levi Palmer. About 18 19 in company with his five broth- 
ers he came to Huron county, Ohio, where they took up land from the govern- 
ment, and, in following his trade, Seeley Palmer built the first courthouse here and 
also many of the first buildings in Norwalk and also in Fitchville. In addition to 
this he also cleared and improved his farm of one hundred and sixty acres and 
erected and operated the first sawmill in this part of the state. On the 14th of 
June, 1826, he was united in marriage to Miss Nancy Abigail Post, and unto them 
were born the following children who are still living : Rundell Beecher ; Hubbard 
Dennison ; Lucy ; Eliza Ann ; Nannie ; and Seeley Burdette. Those of the family 
now deceased are : Delia ; William ; Hannah A. ; and Julia Blanch. The wife and 
mother was a daughter of Ashabel Post, whose ancestors came from Holland to 
America, settling at New York city, then known as New Amsterdam. Ashabel Post 
was a sea captain in early life and later built a large wharf at Middletown, Connec- 
ticut, becoming extensively engaged in the shipping business at that place. He was 
twice married and by his first union had two children, Ashabel, Jr., and Betsey. 
There were also two children by the second marriage, William and Nancy A. Mr. 
Palmer's parents both lived to an advanced age and at their death were laid to 
rest in Fitchville cemetery. 

During his youth Rundell Beecher Palmer was engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
After he had attained his majority he made arrangements for having a home of 



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284 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

his own through his marriage to Miss Julia Bliss, and they have one daughter, 
Minnie Palmer, who is now married. 

Throughout his entire life R. B. Palmer has carried on general farming with 
the exception of three years spent in the service of his country in the Civil war. 
He enlisted in the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to the 
First Brigade of the Second Division of the Twelfth and Twentieth Army Corps. 
He joined the regiment as a private and saw much hard service. His first engage- 
ment was at Cross Lane and he was also at Blue Gap. He likewise participated in 
the battle of Winchester and in others of equal importance, and he was in the tele- 
graph department before and after the war closed. He received many close calls 
while in the service but never sustained any severe wounds. With the exception 
of the time spent at the front he has always carried on general farming and he now 
occupies and owns the old homestead, comprising about four hundred acres of rich 
and arable land. The place is under a high state of cultivation, responding readily 
to the care and labor which Mr. Palmer bestows upon it. He follows the most 
modern methods in his farm work and still gives active supervision to his place 
although he leaves the actual work of the fields to others, for he has now reached 
the seventy-seventh milestone on life's jonrney. His .sister, Miss Eliza Ann Pal- 
mer, resides with him. 

In his religious faith Mr. Palmer is a Congregationalist. His political belief ac- 
cords with the principles of the republican party and he is an active worker in its 
ranks but has continuously declined to become a candidate for office although 
often solicited to do so. His long residence in the county has made him widely 
known and his many substantial qualities have gained for him the high regard in 
which he is uniformlv held. 



LEONARD A. VAIL. 



Leonard A. Vail, who is engaged in general farming in Bronson township, 
lives on the old Vail homestead, comprising one hundred and fifty-two acres of 
well improved and valuable land. He was born on this farm, January 25, 1850, 
his father, David Vail having located on this land in 1835, lt being then wild and 
unimproved. He was born in Newfield, Tompkins county, New York, October 
8, 1811, and in pioneer times, he made his way to the Buckeye state, locating first 
in Elyria. Later he came to Huron county and located on a farm, erecting the 
buildings thereon himself, as he had previously learned and followed the carpenter's 
trade. He was married December 7, 1845, in Fairfield, Huron county, to Miss 
Almira Adams, who was born at Symphronia, Cayuga county, New York, and 
by this union, there were born four sons and one daughter, namely: David W., 
Leonard A., John J., Alice and Charles \V. The wife and mother departed this 
life January 5, 1887, and on the 10th of April, 1888, Mr. Vail wedded Ellen Jean- 
ette Sweet, by whom he had one son, Adelbert S., who is mentioned elsewhere 
in this work, and in which connection a more complete record of the father is given. 
David Vail passed away at his home in Olena, in 1907, when more than ninety-five 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 287 

years of age. He was a highly respected citizen and had made his home in Huron 
county throughout a long period. 

Leonard A. Vail was reared to farm life, assisting in the operation of the 
home farm during the period of his boyhood and youth. He began his educa- 
tion in the district schools near his father's heme and later spent one term in the 
schools at Milan. With the exception of four years spent in the mercantile busi- 
ness in Olena, Mr. Vail has always followed farming and is today the owner of 
the old Vail homestead, comprising one hundred and fifty-two acres. He is very 
methodical in carrying on his work and each year harvests good crops, for which 
he finds ready sale on the market. He has always taken an active interest in public 
improvement. 

In 1873 Mr- Vail was united in marriage to Miss Adelia Robinson, by whom 
he had one son, William D., and after her death, which occurred May 6, 1878, he 
was again married, his second union being with Miss Elvira Taintor, who was 
born in Huron county, March 27, 1850. Her parents were Chauncey and Cordelia 
R. (Phillips) Taintor, the former born in Brighton, Monroe county, New York, 
June 21, 1817, while the birth of the latter occurred in Bristol, Ontario county, 
New York, May 29, 1819. Mr. and Mrs. Taintor were married June 24, 1841, 
and reared a family of four daughters, of whom Mrs. Vail is the youngest. Mr. 
Taintor came of Scotch ancestry, while his wife was of English descent.. He fol- 
lowed farming in Huron county and died August 14, 1849, while Mrs. Taintor de- 
parted this life November 24, 1861. 

Mr. Vail is independent in politics, supporting only the men whom he deems 
best fitted to fill official positions, regardless of party ties. He has ever taken 
a lively interest in all public affairs, lending his aid and influence in the cause of 
every good movement and heartily promoting the progress and advancement of 
his community. 



DANIEL C. CLARY. 



Daniel C. Clary, operating a farm of two hundred and eighty acres in Ridge- 
field township, where he has continued to reside from his birth to the present time, 
was born on the 9th of January, 1858, a son of Homer C. and Laura A. (Hum- 
phreys) Clary. Colonel Humphreys, the maternal great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject, served on the staff of General George Washington, and Daniel C. Clary 
now has in his possession a watch which was presented to the Colonel 
by Washington. Daniel Clary, the grandfather of the gentleman whose 
name initiates this review, made his way from the state of New York to Huron 
county, Ohio, about 1820, being the first man to clear land in this section. His 
death here occurred when he had attained the age of sixty-six years, the com- 
munity thus losing one of its most respected and honored pioneer settlers. He had 
two sons : Homer C the father of Daniel C. Clary ; and George W., who is 
deceased. 

The birth of Homer C. Clary occurred on Christmas day of 1825, in an old log 
house on the farm where our subject now resides. He continued to make his home 



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288 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

on this place throughout his entire life and followed agricultural pursuits as a 
means of livelihood. He was well known and highly esteemed as a worthy na- 
tive son of this county and his demise was the occasion of deep and widespread 
regret. It was in April, 1900, that he was called to his final rest. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Laura A. Humphreys and is a native of Guilford, Con- 
necticut, came to this state with her parents in early life, the journey being made 
by canal boat. They settled in Huron, Erie county, where the marriage of Miss 
Humphreys and Homer C. Clary was subsequently celebrated. Their union was 
blessed with six children, as follows : George, who has passed away ; Ella, who is 
the wife of F. C. Atherton ; David : Daniel C, of this review ; and Edward and 
Frank, both of whom are graduates of the state university at Ann Arbor, Mich- 
igan. Edward is now a civil engineer of Iowa and Frank is practicing law in 
New York city. The mother of these children still survives at the age of eighty 
years and resides on her farm of two hundred and eighty acres in Ridgefield town- 
ship, which is being operated by her son, Daniel C. 

In the acquirement of an education Daniel C. Clary attended the district schools 
and also the public schools at Monroeville. He took up the study of telegraphy in 
early life but throughout practically his entire business career has given his atten- 
tion to the work of general farming with excellent success. On the 25th of Janu- 
ary, 1884, he was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary F. Hill, a daughter of John 
R. and Mathilde (Stephley) Hill, of New York. By this union there is one son, 
Fred H., at home. Mr. Clary has a very wide and favorable acquaintance through- 
out the community in which his entire life has been spent and well deserves men- 
tion in this volume as a worthy representative of an honored pioneer family that 
has been identified with the agricultural interests of this county from the period 
of its earliest settlement to the present time. 



AUGUST P. HORN. 



August P. Horn, living on one of the finest farms in Lyme township, Huron 
county, was born in Peru township, this county, February 6, 1856, a son of Wil- 
liam and Margaret (Boehler) Horn, natives of Germany. They crossed the At- 
lantic in 1849, locating in Huron county, Ohio, where they became identified with 
the early settlers of this district. At first they rented land and then, in 1856, pur- 
chased one hundred and five acres in Peru township. When the land came into 
their possession it was still wild but with untiring energy and determination Mr. 
Horn set about to clear the land and erected a house for his family. Here, the 
remaining days of Mr. and Mrs. William Horn were spent, his death occurring in 
1883, when sixty-four years of age, while the latter survived until ,1903, passing 
away at the age of eighty-three years. Their family consisted of nine children, 
namely: Louise and August, both of whom were born and died in Germany ; Wil- 
liam, who lives in Topeka, Kansas ; Henry, who died in childhood ; Emma, the 
widow of Carl Ohlamacher, now residing in Columbus ; Lcuise, the widow of 
Charles Foust, residing in Monroeville; August P., of this review; Henry, who 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 289 

lives on the old homestead ; and Hermina. Both parents were consistent members 
of the Lutheran church and passed away in the faith of that denomination. 

August P. Horn, who has always resided in this county, attended the district 
schools of his native township in the acquirement of an education, while the pe- 
riods of vacation were spent in the work of the fields, learning lessons concerning 
the value of industry and perseverance. He chose as a life work the occupation to 
which he had been reared and in 1881 he came to this township and located upon 
the farm which is now his home but was then the property of his father. He oper- 
ated this place as a renter for some time and subsequently purchased it, directing 
his energies toward the cultivation of the fields. In the meantime he has made 
most extensive improvements upon the land, erecting in 1887 a fine, large residence 
and commodious and substantial barns and outbuildings, the place being equipped 
with all the accessories of a model farm of the twentieth century. He has carried 
on his agricultural. pursuits along strictly business lines, has ever been most pro- 
gressive and up-to-date in his methods, and his farm today is one of the finest 
to be found in the county. 

On February 10, 1881, Mr. Horn was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Erf, 
a daughter of Phillip and Dorothy (Heyman) Erf and a native of Peru town- 
ship, Huron county, her birth having occurred November 15, 1858:' Unto this 
union were born four children: Dorothy, now a practicing physician of Bcllevue, 
who was graduated from the Homeopathic College of Cleveland and is also a post- 
graduate of the Philadelphia Hospital ; Lewis, attending the Chicago Veterinary 
College; Ella, who is studying at the Providence Hospital at Sandusky, Ohio, 
for the profession of a trained nurse ; and Mabel, who is at home. All are grad- 
uates of Monroeville high school. On May 3, 1906, the wife and mother was called 
to her final rest, and on the 1st of September, 1509, Mr. Horn was again married, 
his second union being with Mrs. Louisa C. Winslow, of Ridgefield township, 
Huron county. 

Mr. Horn holds membership with the Knights of the Maccabees and his po- 
litical allegiance is given to the democratic party, although the honor< and emolu- 
ments of office have no attraction for him, preferring as he does to concentrate his 
energies and attention upon his private business interests. He is not remiss, how- 
ever, in the duties of citizenship, but takes a deep interest in all things which are 
matters of civic virtue and civic pride. He has spent his entire life in this county, 
where he has gained a wide acquaintance, and the fact that he is most respected 
where he is best known indicates that his salient characteristics are in accord with 
the principles of honorable and upright manhood. 



THOMAS LEAK. 



Thomas Leak is numbered among Huron county's retired farmers, his success 
in former years enabling him now to enjoy a rest which he has truly earned and 
richly deserves. He is still the owner of a valuable farm property of one hun- 
dred and fourteen acres in Ripley township but he leaves the care and cultivation 
of this to others and makes his home in North Fairfield. He has passed the seven- 



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290 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ty-first milestone on life's journey, for his birth occurred in Lincolnshire, England, 
May 8, 1838. He is a son of John and Mary Ann (Westerdale) Leak, in whose 
family were six sons, the others being John, William, Henry, Edward and George. 

Thomas Leak spent the first twelve years of his life in the land of his nativity 
and then accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world. They 
were attracted by the favorable reports which they heard concerning the business 
opportunities and advantages in the United States and after living for a time in the 
state of New York they removed to Ohio. Here in the year 1862 Thomas Leak 
was united in marriage to Miss Ann Atyeo, a daughter of Isaac and Ann (Barring- 
ton) Atyeo. The parents had eight children, Ann, John, William, George, James, 
Charlotte, Isaac and Mary. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Leak has been blessed 
with two daughters and three sons, Mary Ann, Charles, Edward, William and 
Alice. 

Following his marriage Thomas Leak took up the occupation of farming as a 
life work and through that avenue of business has provided a comfortable living for 
those depending upon him. He has manifested a spirit of unfaltering diligence 
and perseverance «n the development and improvement of his land and year after 
year through the careful cultivation of his fields he won that success which fol- 
lows persistent, earnest effort. Prospering in his undertakings he became the 
owner of a farm of one hundred and fourteen acres in Ripley township, which he 
still owns and which returns him a gratifying annual income. He is well known 
as a man of financial responsibility, his name ever being an honored one on com- 
mercial paper. 

In his political views Mr. Leak has always been a republican since age con- 
ferred upcn him the nght of franchise and although he has never been an office 
seeker he has always been loyal in his allegiance to the principles which he es- 
pouses. Both he and his wife are members of the Christian church, in which he is 
serving as deacon and their support of the church is generous and their cooperation 
in its various activities is a valuable element in its growth. 



WILLIAM B. CLAUS. 



William B. Claus is the owner of one hundred acres, constituting one of the 
best farms of Peru township. He is diligent and determined in the prosecution 
of his business affairs and his close application and energy are bringing to him 
success which he justly merits. He is a young man but already has made for him- 
self a creditable name in agricultural circles. He was born in Sherman township, 
Huron county, November 15, 1880, and in both the paternal and maternal lines 
comes of German ancestry. His parents were Mathias and Josephine (Schank) 
Claus, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father, who was born Octo- 
ber 20, 1834, was a son of Mathias and Mary Claus, who in the year 1852, crossed 
the Atlantic to America and made their way to Huron county, Ohio, settling in 
Sherman township, where they purchased forty acres of land. On this place was 
an old log house, which the father occupied for about five years, when the property 
was sold and another farm was purchased. On the second place, also in Slier- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 291 

man township, the grandparents spent their remaining days. The grandmother 
was only about forty years of age at the time of her demise, but the grandfather 
reached the venerable age of eighty-two years. Their family numbered a daughter 
and three sons : Mrs. Helen Fisher, who is now a widow and resides in Belle 
vue, Ohio ; Martin, a resident farmer of Sherman township ; Mathias ; and George, 
who is also living in Sherman township. 

Mathias Claus, the father of our subject, was a young lad in his teens when 
he accompanied his parents on their removal from Germany to the new world. 
He had attended school in his native land and for a brief period continued his 
studies in this country, but his time and attention were largely given to farm 
work after he reached the United States. He has always carried on general 
agricultural pursuits and his labors have been attended with gratifying success. 
He married Miss Josephine Schank, a daughter of Frank and Helen Schank, of 
Sherman township, the wedding being celebrated January 7, 1867. Mrs. Claus 
was born in Germany, February 14, 1846, and came to Huron country with her 
parents when eighteen years of age, the family home being established in Nor 
walk township, where her father purchased land and developed a farm. He died 
there at the age of seventy-five years, but the mother passed away in Germany 
when forty-two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Mathias Claus are still residents of 
Sherman township and have lived upon one farm for about forty years. He has 
always been loyal and progressive in his citizenship and in 1864, he espoused the 
cause of his adopted country, enlisting as a member of Company C, Sixty-fourth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He joined the regiment at Sandusky and then went to 
Camp Chase and afterward participated in a number of battles and skirmishes. 
He was in the engagement at Nashville, Franklin and other places and was 
mustered out at Nashville in 1865. After the close of the war, he returned home 
and has since carried on general farming. He has worked diligently and persis- 
tently to attain the success which he now enjoys and his honest and upright life 
have won for him a firm hold on the regard and affections of his fellow towns- 
men. He has been active in community affairs as a member of the school board 
and as road supervisor and was called to this office as a candidate of the republican 
party. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church. Unto him and his wife 
were born nine children : Frank, who is living at home ; Carrie, the wife of Frank 
A. Heddle, a resident of Monroeville, Ohio, by whom she has four children : Oar- 
ice, Loretta, Irene and Walter ; Mary, who is the wife of John Rossman, of Mon- 
roeville and has two children : Olive and Lucile ; Josephine, who is the wife of 
Ed S. Bick, of Peru township, and has one child, Beatrice ; William, of this review; 
Louise, at home; Joe, who is in Pennsylvania; and Emma and Fred, both at 
home. 

William B. Claus was reared on the old homestead farm in Sherman town- 
ship, where he remained until twenty-two years of age, since which time he has 
lived in Peru township. In his youthful days, he enjoyed such sports as engross 
the attention of the children of the neighborhood and improved the opportunities 
for acquiring an education in the public schools. He also received ample train- 
ing at farm work and determined to make the occupation to which he was reared his 
life work. As a companion and helpmate for life's journey, he chose Miss Flor- 
ence Holliday, who was born in Toledo, Ohio, and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 



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292 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

William Holliday, who are now residents of Norwalk, Ohio. In their family were 
six children, the eldest of whom is Mrs. Claus, the others being: William, Carl, 
Edward, Esther and Wanda. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Clause occurred 
April 15, 1902, and unto them have been born three children: Calla, Donald and 
Josephine. 

It was in 1905 that Mr. Claus purchased his present farm, on which he has 
since made a number ofsubstantial improvements. He has here one hundred acres 
of rich land which is divided into fields of convenient size by well kept fences. 
He studies the demands of the soil, knows what is most needed for the produc- 
tion of various cereals and by the rotation of crops keeps his land in good condi- 
tion. He has made a number of improvements upon his place, utilizes modern 
machinery to facilitate the work of the fields and is now successfully engaged in 
general farming. He belongs to the Catholic church of Peru township and is 
known as a man of business reliability as well as of enterprise. 



CHARLES J. BRANT. 

One of the prosperous farmers of Greenfield township, who has taken an 
active part in local affairs, is Charles J. Brant, who owns the one hundred and 
thirteen acres on which he lives. He was born in this township. May 16, 1848, 
and is the son of John K. and Catherine (Glasford) Brant. The former was 
of eastern birth but was only a young boy when his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jabe Brant, came to Ohio and settled near Readtown. John K. Brant lived 
in Greenfield township the greater part of his life and became one of its well 
known and highly respected citizens. He devoted himself to farming, acquired 
two hundred and eleven acres of land and served as township trustee and as a 
member of the school board for a number of years. He was a man who advo- 
cated progress and the road on which his son's farm lies was cut as the result 
of his efforts. His wife was born in New York state and was only a child when 
her parents, John and Cynthia Glasford, removed to Ohio, casting in their lot 
with the early settlers of Greenfield township. Four children were born to 
John K. and Catherine Brant : Cynthia, who married Edwin Wiles, both now de- 
ceased ; Charles J. ; Francis, who lives in Kansas ; and George, of Norwalk. The 
life of the wife and mother was brought to a close in 1899, when she was in her • 
seventy-sixth year, and her husband survived her until December 6, 1906, when 
he was called to his final rest. 

Greenfield township has been the home of Charles J. Brant through all his. 
life. At the old log school house of the district he received his training in the 
fundamentals of English education. It was meager enough equipment for life, 
even though it was supplemented with good home training in the way of farm- 
ing. For many years Mr. Brant operated on rented land, but in the fall of 
1893 purchased of George Strimple the farm he now occupies. . This he has 
since greatly improved, both as to buildings and as regards the condition of 
the land itself. He has studied his soil with the intention of obtaining from it 
the best results, has practiced a scientific rotation of crops, employs the most 



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MR. AND MRS. C. J. BRANT 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 295 

up-to-date machinery, and in other ways has kept abreast of the progress that 
has been made in the methods of agriculture as in other branches of business. 

On the 2d of July, 1873, Mr. Brant was united in. marriage to Miss Sarah 
Boice, a daughter of John and Eleanor (Barlow) Boice. The former was a 
native of Belmont county, Ohio, and was sixty-five years of age when he died 
in 1879. In his family were four children: Drusilla, deceased; Elisha, de- 
ceased; Sarah and William, of this township. Mrs. Brant's mother died when 
she was but five years old and she went to live with her uncle, George Stet- 
son, of New London, returning in later life to live with her father. She has 
become the mother of six children: Mary, born May 8, 1874, died March 26, 
1886; Ella is the wife of William Gamble, of Chicago, Ohio, and the mother of 
three children, Lawrence, Dale and Wilma, deceased; Fannie married George 
Lindsey, of Toledo, and they have four children, Florence, Gladys, Eulalie and 
Thelma; Ethel is the wife of G. Gamble, of Norwalk, Ohio; Pearl is the wife 
of Frank Wolfe, of Richmond township; and Catherine married Ross Keesey, 
also of Richmond township. 

A successful farmer and well known, Mr. Brant has on many occasions 
been the citizens' choice for the several offices at their disposal in the township. 
Among those he has filled may be mentioned that of road supervisor and of 
school director, and his administration was distinguished by thought for the 
public welfare and a commendable spirit of progress. 



EDWARD L. CONGER. 



Edward L. Conger, a prosperous farmer of Greenfield township, Huron coun- 
ty, and the owner of ninety acres of land on which he lives, was born in this town- 
ship and is the son of Lewis L. and Isabelle (Lowther) Conger. The father was 
born September 8, 1824, at Ludlow ville, New York, and in 1833 came with his 
parents to Milan, Ohio, where his father started a mill, there working until 1850, 
when the family removed to Greenfield township, and twenty years later purchased 
the farm which was his home until his death and has since been the home of his 
widow. On his mother's side Mr. Conger is descended from a line of pioneers. 
His great-grandfather, Henry Lowther, was of Irish birth and came to this coun- 
try at the time of the rebellion in his home land. He settled in New York state, 
where he followed the vocation of farming and attained to a prosperity and posi- 
tion among his associates that was above the average. On one occasion, how- 
ever, he lost a large sum, which was the result of years of toil, when a friend, 
who had appealed to him for aid, jumped his bond. His son, Edward H. Lowther, 
was born in New York city in 1800 and was seventeen years of age when he came 
to Greenfield township, to make it his home. He attained considerable local promi- 
nence, was known as Captain Lowther from his being a captain of the militia, and 
held several offices in the township. His wife, who survived him but a year, was 
born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, but came to Ohio when the fields were 
covered with forests and Indians were seen almost daily. She died in 1887, after 
having brought into the world a family of seven children: Thomas, deceased; 



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296 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mariette, the widow of Ira Watterman ; Isabelle, the mother of our subject ; Sarah, 
the widow of William Graham ; Helen, the deceased wife of Barnett Rowe ; and 
James. To Mr. arid Mrs. Conger were born four children : Edward L. ; Halsv, who 
died at the age of five months ; Julia, the deceased wife of Charles Palmer and the 
mother of two children, Florence and Charles; and Lewis, who married Miss Ada 
Daly, of this township, and has one child, Frances J. Mr. Conger died November 
ii, 1899, but his widow still lives and conducts the farm he had bought. 

Greenfield township has been the home of Edward L. Conger during all his life. 
He was born a deaf and dumb mute and attended the school for mutes at Colum- 
bus. While there he learned the trade of a shoemaker but has never worked at that 
occupation, having followed agriculture instead. Along this line he has been very 
successful, his fields producing as abundantly and the buildings being in as good 
repair as if he were not handicapped in the battle of life, and rightly so, for it is in- 
dustry and hard work that counts, thus being able to surmount obstacles that might 
otherwise overwhelm one. 

In 1871, while in school in Columbus, Mr. Conger met Miss Nellie Hall, also a 
pupil at the mutes' institution and a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Hall, of 
South Lebanon, Pennsylvania. On the 8th of May, 1879, at ner home, was read 
the service that made the two young people man and wife in the eyes of the law. 
Their union has been blessed with two children: Mary Bell, born May 13, 1883, 
and Ray, born August 30, 1887. 

Mr. Conger is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church and all his life and ac- 
tions are ordered by what he believes to be the right and in accord with the teach- 
ings of his religion. He is a fine man, imbued with many noble traits of character, 
and those who know him hold him in high regard. 



CALVIN C. BROOKS. 



Calvin C. Brooks, successful because of his unfaltering determination and in- 
<leTatigable industry, now lives on a farm of eighty-eight acres in Peru township, 
from which property he derives his substantial annual income. He is one of the 
native sons of the county, his birth having occurred in Greenfield township on the 
20th of April, i860. His parents were William and Sophronia (Parsons) Brooks. 
The father, who was born in Vermont in 1809, came to Ohio with his parents when 
a young man and settled about three miles north of Chicago Junction. There he 
developed a good farm property, owning at one time about three hundred acres of 
land. His wife was a native of the state of New York and she, too, came with her 
parents to Huron county, the family home being established in Greenfield town- 
ship. The death of William Brooks occurred in 1869, when he was sixty years 
of age, and his widow, surviving him for about thirty-five years, died in the fall of 
1004. They were the parents of nine children: Francis L., who is now living in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania ; Mortimer, a resident of Oklahoma ; Darwin, living 
at Steuben, Ohio; Mrs. Lucy France, who is a widow now located at Oklahoma; 
Parsons, deceased ; Augustine, residing in Peru township ; Calvin C. ; Kate, the 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 297 

wife of Samuel Hall, whose home is in North Fairfield, Ohio ; and one who died in 
infancy. 

Calvin C. Brooks was reared in Greenfield township to the age of twenty-nine 
years and in his youthful days attended the district schools, his time being divided 
between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the 
work of the home farm. Since putting aside his text-books his entire time has been 
devoted to general farming. He went to Wisconsin a number of years ago and 
took up one hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he lived for five years, 
when he sold that property. He also worked at Spokane Falls, Washington, and 
after a brief sojcurn on the Pacific coast he returned to Ohio and purchased his 
present farm from George Barman. He has since made a number of improve- 
ments en the property and is busily engaged in the work of general farming, trans- 
forming the place into rich and productive fields, from which he annually gathers 
gc od harvests. 

Mr. Brooks married Miss Kathryn Sysel, a daughter of James and Kathryn 
(Extine) Sysel, natives of Bohemia. This marriage was celebrated February 20, 
1895, an d unt0 tnem nave been born seven children: Blanch, William, Ralph, May, 
Gladys, Elsie and Grace. Of this family all are yet living with the exception of 
Elsie and Blanch. Mrs. Brooks was born in Bohemia and when fourteen years of 
age came to this country with some relatives, her parents always remaining in their 
native land. Her father is still living there at the age of eighty years, but the 
mother died June 28, 1895. They were the parents of seven children : James, who 
is now in Minnesota ; Mary, a resident of Bohemia ; Anna, who is also in Minnesota ; 
Jacob, deceased ; Kathryn, now Mrs. Brooks ; and George and Joseph, both of 
whom are in Bohemia. By a former marriage Mr. Brooks had a daughter, Eliza- 
beth Bell, who is now the wife of Fred Porter and lives in Waseon, Ohio. They 
have two children, Sylvester and Daniel. By her former marriage Mrs. Brooks 
had two daughters, Jennie and Agnes, who are now living with our subject. 

Mr. Brooks is interested in the cause of education and has served as school di- 
rector for a number of years, doing all in his power to advance the cause of public 
instruction. His political allegiance is given to the democracy, which finds in him 
a stalwart champion, but he does not seek nor desire office, preferring to concen- 
trate his energies upon his business affairs. 



MARTIN ELLIS. 

One of the men who has made a success of general farming in Greenwich 
township, is Martin Ellis, a member of one of the pioneer families of Ohio. He 
is the son of John and Rachel (Rickard) Ellis, whose parents were originally res- 
idents of Onondaga county, New York, and came to Mansfield, Ohio, in the early 
pioneer days, where the father followed the carpenter's trade for some years. 
At length, having accumulated the necessary funds, he bought one hundred acres 
in Greenwich township, Huron county, and took up the active life of the general 
farmer of that day. Game was very plentiful in the earlier years of his residence 
here and John Ellis secured many a deer with his ever present rifle. Although he 



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298 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

had but twenty-five cents in cash and a small chest of carpenter's tools when he 
arrived in Ohio, before his death he became the owner of fully six hundred acres 
of Huron county land, well stocked and improved. Seven of the eight children of 
this pioneer family grew to maturity: Sidney, Thirsa, John R., Martin, Leona, 
Pauline, Hiram and Sarah, but the only ones now living are Martin, Pauline and 
Sarah. In March, 1890, at the age of seventy-three, the father, noted for his great 
moral and physical courage, and a respected participator in public affairs, was laid 
away by the side of the mother, who had died in 1887 and was buried in Ripley 
cemetery. 

Martin Ellis was born on the old homestead in Greenwich township, May 13, 
1847, an d secured his education in the district schools of that township. He served 
the usual apprenticeship of the farmer lad until he was twenty, when he started 
out in life for himself. On December 28, 1871, was celebrated his marriage to 
Mary E. Stotts, who was the daughter of James and Eliza (Titus) Stotts, of Rip- 
ley township. To Mr. and Mrs. Ellis have been born two sons: James H., de- 
ceased, and Ray. 

Mr. Ellis settled on his own land soon after marriage and at present holds the 
title to one hundred and twenty acres of well tilled, well improved and well stocked 
farm land. He does not need to specialize, as all of the varied interests of the gen- 
eral farmer have succeeded under his hand. He has been amply aided by his son, 
Ray, who bids fair to make as good a farmer as his parent. He was married Sep- 
tember 1, 1909, to Miss Lotha McCarty, a daughter of George and Mary (Swope) 
McCarty of Greenwich township. He is a member of Greenwich Lodge, No. 543, 
F. & A. M., and also a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. 

The democratic party claims Mr. Ellis' allegiance, and he has been consistently 
active in public affairs, serving as road overseer and member of the board of educa- 
tion. While not a member of any church, he yet supports the cause of religion, and 
is always interested in all matters which are for the benefit of the race. He is re- 
ferred to as one of the best farmers of the county and is universally respected for 
his progressiveness. 



OTTO BOEHLER. 



An excellent farm of one hundred and forty-two acres in Lyme township, this 
county, pays tribute to the care and labor of Otto Boehler, who in his business in- 
terests is meeting with well merited success. He was born in Peru township, Hu- 
ron county, September 5, 1869, a son of Phillip and Marguerita (Seibel) Boeh- 
ler, natives of Germany. The former, who was born November 7, 1824, arrived in 
the United States in 1848 and settled in Huron county, Ohio, being employed in 
Peru township for about three years. He subsequently owned property in Lyme 
township, which he sold, and later purchased a farm in Sherman township, which 
in turn he disposed of and secured a farm in Peru township. At the time of his 
death, which occurred May 3, 1897, in Monroeville, Ridgefield township, he was 
recognized as an extensive landowner. He was first married to Miss Mary Sei- 
bel, a native of Germany, who was born April 1, 1831, and after her death he was 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 299 

united in marriage to Miss Jeanetta Knoble. The children of the first union were 
William, Henry, Phillip, Otto, Minnie and Louise, all of whom still survive. 

To the district schools of Peru township and also of Monroeville, Ridgefield 
township, Otto Boehler is indebted for his education, and he also learned many 
practical and valuable lessons while assisting in the work of the farm during the 
periods of vacation. He remained at home until 1890, when he began working for 
G. G. Horn, with whom he was connected for two years. He then began busi- 
ness on his own account, taking charge of the farm upon which he now resides. 
It was given to him by his father who had, in 1871, purchased the tract from a Mr. 
Smith. It is an excellent farm of one hundred and forty-two acres, upon which 
Mr. Boehler has placed many improvements. He is industrious, enterprising and 
persevering, and his good management of his business interests is bringing him 
substantial success. 

On the 7th of January, 1892, Mr. Boehler was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Horn, a daughter of Philip and Catherine (Seel) Horn, old German set- 
tlers of this county. She is a native of Lyme township, born March 18, 1871, and 
by her marriage became the mother of three children: Clarence, born October 
25, 1892; Alma, born June 11, 1896; and Adolph, born November 20, 1898. The 
family is still unbroken by the hand of death, and all are yet at home. 

The religious faith of Mr. Boehler is indicated in his membership in the 
Lutheran church, while fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of the 
World Camp, No. 40. He has never sought to figure in a public light, yet his de- 
votion to the public welfare is unquestioned, arising as it does from a sincere desire 
for the substantial and permanent growth of the community. Honest and up- 
right in all of his business dealings, he has won the respect and good will of his 
fellowmen, while his sterling qualities have gained for him a wide circle of warm 
friends. 



BENJAMIN F. BECK. 

The rich farming land of Huron county yields ready response to the care 
and labors of the agriculturist and if the farmer is wise and prudent he may in 
the course of years gain a substantial competence as the direct result of his labors. 
Such has been the history of Benjamin F. Beck, who is now living in North 
Fairfield but in former years was closely associated with general farming. He 
started upon the journey of life in 1851, his birth having occurred in New Haven 
township, Huron county. His parents were Jacob and Mary (Berlin) Beck, who 
were numbered among the pioneer residents of the county, settling here when the 
work of progress and development seemed scarcely begun. The Becks have al- 
ways been thrifty people and Benjamin Beck was reared to habits of perseverance, 
industry and economy. His education was acquired in the district schools of the 
neighborhood and through the periods of vacation he worked in the fields as he 
assisted in the operations of the home farm. He was thus well qualified to 
take charge of a farm of his own when he started out in life for himself. 

As companion and helpmate for life's journey Mr. Beck chose Miss Hulda 
Sothern, a daughter of James P. and Mary Elizabeth (Stiles) Sothern. Her peo- 



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300 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

pie, too, arrived in Huron county in pioneer times and her father was active in the 
early development of this part of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Beck began their do- 
mestic life upon a farm and as the years passed Mr. Beck diligently and persis- 
tently carried on his work. He studied the matter of rotating crops, came to 
know the properties of the soil and what was needed for the production of different 
cereals. His farm work was thus intelligently directed and brought to him the 
prosperity which now enables him to live retired. 



WILLIAM S. RUGGLES. 

William S. Ruggles, who is the owner of a sawmill and one hundred and 
thirty-two acres of land in Peru township, on which he lives, was born on this 
farm, March 31, 1853. He is a son of George W. and Mary Elizabeth (Sny- 
der) Ruggles. His grandparents, Joseph and Mary Ruggles, came to Huron 
county from the state of New York, traveling overland with a yoke of oxen in 
181 5, bringing with them the several children who had been born unto them 
in the east. They resided about a half mile east of the place on which William 
S. Ruggles now makes his home, and for a few years they lived in a little barn 
on the Henry Adams farm, which they converted into a rude dwelling, occupy- 
ing it until Joseph Ruggles purchased the place which is now the home of our 
subject. It was a tract of timberland when it came into his possession but he at 
once began to clear away the trees and the brush and, in the midst of the for- 
est, built a log house. It was abount 181 7 that he established his home there 
and as time passed he vigorously prosecuted the work of the farm, transform- 
ing the tract of forest land into richly cultivated fields. Subsequently he built 
and operated the first cidermill in the county and was closely associated with 
the work of early development and improvement. He died in 1849 at the age 
of sixty-nine years, while his wife passed away in 1850. 

George W. Ruggles, the father, also lived in Peru township and for many 
years made his home above the old cidermill. In the early days he pursued his 
studies in one of the log schools of the township wherein but a few branches of 
learning were taught. Although his educational opportunities were limited his 
training in farm work was not meager and throughout his entire life he con- 
tinued to actively till the soil. His lack of early educational advantages was 
obviated by the fact that he remained throughout his entire life a great reader 
and thus added continuously to his knowledge. His wife was born in Milan, 
Ohio, a daughter of William and Mary (Norris) Snyder, who were early set- 
tlers of Huron country, coming to Ohio from Pennsylvania. The death of Mrs 
Ruggles occurred July 1, 1905. She was the mother of five children, namely: 
Mary B., the wife of James Clifford of Findlay, Ohio; William S., of this re- 
view; Walter and Charles, both deceased; and Loretta E., the wife of Frank 
Schlagater, of Bronson township. 

William S. Ruggles has always lived upon the home place, the district being 
known as Ruggles Corners. He attended the schools of the neighborhood in his 
early days and throughout his entire life has carried on general farming and 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 303 

has also operated a sawmill for about twenty years. He married Miss Alice 
J. Owen, a daughter of Lafayette and Mary J. (Clark) Owen, of Greenfield 
township, the wedding being celebrated on the 30th of August, 1876. Mrs. 
Ruggles was born in Greenfield township, where her parents lived until they 
were called to their final rest. Unto our subject and his wife have been born 
two children : J. C, whose birth occurred February 2, 1885, and who married 
Ethel Baxter, their home being now in Peru township ; and Harry, who was born 
February 19, 1889, an< i 1S st iU under the parental roof. 

As he prospered in his undertakings William S. Ruggles purchased the old 
homestead from his father and has since made many substantial improvements 
upon the place. He has built a fine barn, has remodeled the house and has 
added all of the accessories and conveniences known to the model farm of the 
twentieth century. In 1892 the sawmill which he owned near his home was 
destroyed by fire and he then built a steam sawmill on his farm, which he oper- 
ated until 1902. In that year he sold out and two years later installed a gaso- 
line engine and again entered the business of sawing lumber, which proves a 
profitable source of revenue to him. His fields, too, are carefully cultivated and 
return rich crops, which find a ready sale on the market. 

Mr. Ruggles has been somewhat prominent in community affairs. He served 
as township trustee for five years, having been elected on the republican ticket 
by a majority of twenty-nine in a township which usually gives over one hun- 
dred democratic majority, his election, therefore, plainly indicating his per- 
sonal popularity and the confidence and trust reposed in him. He has also 
served as school director and as road supervisor, and he withholds his coopera- 
tion from no measure or movement which he deems essential to the public 
good. He is a trustee of the Universalist church of Peru township and for 
twenty years has been a member of the Royal Arcanum of Norwalk. He repre- 
sents one of the oldest families of the county, the name of Ruggles having ever 
stood in this community for progressive citizenship and for enterprise in busi- 
ness. The record of William S. Ruggles is in harmony with that of the others 
of the name and he is now numbered among the representative and valued citi- 
zens of Huron county. 



LOUIS P. HEYMAN. 



Louis P. Heyman, who has but recently retired from the active cultivation of 
the hundred and forty-five acres he owns in Lyme township, Huron county, was 
born on this farm, March 10, 1857, a son of John P. and Jeanette (Scheide) 
Heyman. Both parents were born in Germany, the father July 9, 1833, the 
mother April 19, 1837, but both came to this country so early in life that they are 
numbered among the pioneers of this county. The mother was but fifteen when 
she came with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Scheide, to Peru township. 
John P. Heyman came to America in 1848, with his father, settling at Hunts 
Corners, Ohio, where his brother Philip had located the year previous and had 



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304 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

bought about fifty-five acres of land. There the old people died, the grandfather 
in 1881, though not until after he had made a name for himself in the community, 
for he and his two sons, John and Philip, together owned about three hundred 
acres and were among those who contributed largely, both in gifts of land and 
money, to the establishment of the Reformed church. In fact the edifice was 
erected on part of the fifty-five acres which Philip had bought on coming to this 
county. 

John P. Heyman was a prominent fanner in his locality. He was also interested 
in the Heyman Milling Company, of Monroeville, and as a school director and 
road superintendent served the people well for a long term of years. Likewise he 
was prominent in the Reformed church he had helped to build, having been an 
elder for a number of years and a deacon at the time of his death. When his 
earthly course was done, on the 19th of October, 1899, he was accounted one of 
the most prosperous farmers in his locality, being possessed of about four hundred 
acres. In April, 1856, he married Miss Jeanette Scheide, who bore him nine chil- 
dren : Lewis P. ; Frank, deceased ; F. D. ; William O. ; Jennie, deceased ; Julia, 
the wife of William Kern ; Flora, the wife of Calvin Heyman ; Lillian, who mar- 
ried James Clinton; and one who died in infancy. 

Louis P. Heyman has always lived in Lyme township. He attended the district 
schools in the acquirement of an education and worked on the farm with his 
father during his youth. In 1898 he bought the place from his father, making it 
his own home to the present time. Since his acquisition of the property he has 
made many extensive improvements, one of them being the erection of a large and 
handsome residence. Although he has devoted himself with such diligence to the 
demands of his farm and is accounted one of the most successful agriculturists of 
this township, he has yet found time to serve the people as justice of the peace 
for a period of ten years, as constable, besides filling some other minor offices. 
He is vice-president and a director of the Heyman Milling Company, of Monroe- 
ville, and also a director of the Sherman Gas & Oil Company. Being very fond 
of good horses, one of his chief delights is in driving. 

On the 18th of November, 1885, Mr. Heyman was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Hartman, a daughter of George and Cornelia (Mook) Hartman, of Bellevue, 
Ohio. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania, the father born in 1828, 
the mother in 1831, and they were among the early settlers here, arriving 
long before anything approaching the present conveniences of travel came into 
vogue the journey being made from their old home to Black Swamp, Sandusky 
county, in an ox cart. Mr. Hartman died in 1900, and his wife survived him but 
two years. In their family were three children, Isabelle, Frank and Elizabeth. 
The last named, who is now Mrs. Heyman, was graduated from the Bellevue high 
school and for several years successfully engaged in teaching. She and her hus- 
band still take an active interest in educational affairs and are giving their chil- 
dren the best possible advantages along that line, while Mr. Heyman is also doing 
effective service as a member of the board of education. They have two daugh- 
ters. Mabel and Ruth, and the former is a graduate of the Bellevue high school 
and also of Heidelberg University at Tiffin, Ohio, of the class of 1908, receiving 
the degree of L. B. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Heyman were also born two sons, but 
Floyd, who was born April 25, 1891, died on the 21st of the following August; 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 305 

and Gordon, born November n, 1898, died March 27, 1899. They now have an 
adopted son. 

Mr. Heyman is prominent in all the work of the Reformed church, of which 
he has been an elder and trustee for a number of years and his wife is also an ac- 
tive church worker, serving as assistant superintendent of the Sunday school 
and devoting some time every week to instructing a class in Bible study. In 
short, Mr. Heyman and his family are well and favorably known. He has now 
laid aside the active duties of life, but the record* of his past, both as a private 
citizen and as a servant of the people, is an enviable one. 



CHARLES H. WHEATON. 

A history of Norwalk township would not be complete without mention of 
Charles H. Wheaton, who for many years has been known as one of the best judges 
and successful buyers of stock in Huron county. He was born in England on the 
5th of February, 1840, and is a son of Daniel Wheaton, who came to America in 
the early '50s and first took up his residence in Monroeville, while a few months 
later he removed to Norwalk. He was a butcher by occupation, and after his ar- 
rival in Norwalk he rented a building of Lester Clark, where he started in the meat 
business, continuing in this line of activity for many years, when the business was 
taken charge of by his two sons, Charles and Dennis. He was known as one of the 
best judges of stock, not only in England, but also in this country. Ere coming 
to America he had conducted a market in Cambridge College Place, where he en- 
gaged principally in supplying the colleges. He was eminently a business man, 
possessing keen sagacity and good management, and he became identified with va- 
rious enterprises, all of which became factors in his subsequent success. About 
a year after his arrival in Norwalk he purchased the farm of ninety-six acres upon 
which our subject now resides, this property having been in the family since 1852. 
Later he purchased the De Walt property, where Harkness and surrounding 
buildings now stand, including the row of brick cottages extending to Seminary 
street. He bought from Mr. Underhill the old American Hotel property, which 
site is now covered by the three stores commencing at Frazier's and extending 
east. This property is now owned by the estate. He also invested in three stores 
in Huron, which are now in the possession of his son Dennis E. Wheaton. He 
was a member of the Baptist church and affiliated with the democratic party, and 
was considered one of the alert and progressive citizens of his community. He 
passed away in 1898, leaving a very handsome estate. 

Charles H. Wheaton, whose name introduces this review, was a lad of eleven 
years when he accompanied his father to the United States, and his education, 
which was begun in England, was completed in this country. He continued under 
the parental roof until the year 1861, when, in response to President Lincoln's call 
for troops, he enlisted for three months' service as a member of Captain Saw- 
yer's independent company organized under the laws of the state of Ohio. At the 
expiration of his term of enlistment he returned home and, in connection with his 
brother, Dennis E. Wheaton, took charge of his father's meat business, which 



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306 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

they carried on for many years, or until the block was destroyed by fire. The 
brothers then went to Cleveland, where they were engaged in a similar enterprise 
for seventeen years, and at the end of that time our subject returned to the old 
homestead to take care of his father and his father's estate. The fine brick house 
which the latter erected still stands upon the place and is in excellent condition. 
Mr. Wheaton is engaged in the stock business and, like his father, is one of the 
best judges and one of the most successful buyers of stock in Huron county. 
He has purchased cattle since he was a boy of fourteen years and has the reputa- 
tion of having bought more stock than any other buyer in this county. His 
life has been one of continuous activity, in which his industry and energy, have 
been salient characteristics. While engaged in the meat business he was recognized 
as one of the leading men in that line, and that he prospered and won a goodly 
amount cf success is indicated by the handsome competence which he has acquired 
as the result of well directed energy. 

In November, i860, Mr. Wheaton was united in marriage to Miss Anna Ly- 
dia Hoyt, who was born in March, 1834, a daughter of Acrebeach Hoyt. Unto this 
union have been born the following children : Minnie, who wedded George Crumm 
and later married Fred Smies : Dora, the wife of Edgar Lee ; and Mary, the wife 
of Walter E. Bateles, by whom she has two children, Elmer Darwin and Mary 
Mehn. In politics Mr. Wheaton is independent, reserving the right to vote for the 
men and measures which, in his estimation, are best adapted to conserve the public 
good. Although born across the water, Mr. Wheaton is as loyal to the interests 
of his adopted country as any American-born citizen, and he has gained high rank 
among the representative men of Norwalk township, not only by reason of the 
gratifying degree of success which he has attained but also because of his hon- 
orable manhood and true personal worth. 



HYATT TRAVIS. 



Hyatt Travis, now living retired from the duties of business life, has for many 
years been actively and helpfully interested in the public affairs of Greenwich 
township and is, moreover, a well known and prominent figure in the political cir- 
cles of his community. He was born on the 10th of August, 1839, in New York 
city, a son of Jacob and Sarah (Hyatt) Travis, and remained in his native city 
until fourteen years of age, when he accompanied the family on their removal to 
New Rochelle, New York. They remained there for one year, when the father took 
the family to Yorktown, New York, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
eight years. 

The education of Hyatt Travis had been commenced in the public schools of 
New York city and after the removal of the family from that city he pursued a 
course of study for several terms in the district schools, remaining with his pa- 
rents until i860. In December of that year he came to Greenwich, where his 
brother Oscar had arrived six years previously, while the parents and the remain- 
ing members of the family followed him in 1862. On reaching this city he as- 
sociated with his brother in the operation of a farm until the following September 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 307 

when, in response to his country's call for troops, he enlisted as a member of 
Company I, Third Regiment of Ohio Cavalry for three years. He served two 
years, however, when he veteranized and continued with the same company and 
regiment until the close of the war, his entire service covering a period of three 
years and nine months, being mustered out in August, 1865. During this time 
he saw much hard service under General Thomas, General Wood and later under 
General Wilson. He participated in many of the hotly contested battles of the 
war, in the meantime having two horses shot from under him. The first occa- 
sion was just after the battle of Stone- River while engaged with his company in 
a slight skirmish. His horse was killed and he was taken prisoner and sent to 
Libby prison at Richmond, Virginia. After three weeks spent in that place he 
was paroled and sent home, where he remained until exchanged about four 
months later, when he returned to his regiment. He again had a horse shot from 
under him during the battle of Chickamauga but on this occasion escaped capture. 
Throughout his entire service, during which time he was often in the thickest of 
the fight, he was never wounded although he returned home very much broken 
in health. 

After the close of the war he entered the service of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, 
Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Company as brakeman but severed his connection 
therewith after eleven months, owing to the state of his health. He was then 
married in 1868, after which he engaged in farming in Greenwich township for 
eight years. At the expiration of this period, however, he was compelled to give 
up agricultural pursuits, as his health would no longer permit of the strenuous 
duties that devolved upon him in that connection. He then came to Greenwich and 
became identified with general mercantile interests, being thus engaged for nearly 
four years. Again he attempted farming but found that the state of his health 
had not improved and was once more compelled to give up that pursuit. Con- 
sequently he sold his farm and returned to Greenwich, where he has since lived 
practically retired. 

He has, however, been very active in public affairs, becoming well known in 
the political circles of the community, while since his retirement from business life 
he has been almost continuously before the public in an official capacity. He votes 
with the republican party and for several terms served as village and township 
treasurer. Something of his personal popularity was shown in the fact that he 
was elected mayor of his town and served as chief executive for two terms. He 
is now acting as justice of the peace, which position he has filled for several years, 
while from 1889 until 1893 he was postmaster of Greenwich. He has been clerk 
and also president of the school board, the cause of education at all times finding 
in him a stalwart champion. Active in the interests of his party, he has several 
times acted as a delegate to various conventions and has frequently been a mem- 
ber of the county central committee, being a prominent figure in the party coun- 
cils. His career as a public official has ever been an exemplary one, performing his 
duties in every instance in a manner that gained for him the favorable commenda- 
tion and the endorsement of his constituents. His position has never been an 
equivocal one for he has ever stood on the side of truth and right in all things. 

On the 1st of September, 1868, Mr. Travis was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie Hoag, a daughter of Jesse and Mary (Watson) Hoag, the former a prom- 



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308 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

inent agriculturist of Greenwich township. Unto this union have been born 
seven children, nameiy: Ella, the wife of Frederick Miller; George, deceased; 
William; Charles, who has also passed away; Ira J.; Elmer, residing in Youngs- 
town; and Hazel. 

The family, although not members, attend the Methodist Episcopal church, 
while Mr. Travis maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through 
his membership in Greenwich Post, No. 279, G. A. R., in which he has filled all of 
the offices. He has also been a delegate several times to the state encampments of 
this organization. He has ever been an advocate of public improvement and ex- 
erts his influence toward the adoption of all those measures which have for their 
object the welfare and upbuilding of the community. He has now completed the 
Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten and in the evening of life 
he enjoys the full respect and confidence of all who know him. 



W. B. KEEFER. 



W. B. Keefer is numbered among the men to whom Chicago Junction owes 
its growth, its development and its prosperity. His efforts have been of a prac- 
tical nature, far-reaching and beneficial. He acted as the first postmaster of 
the new town and since that time has been most closely associated with its prog- 
ress and improvement, figuring prominently now in its business circles as a rep- 
resentative of its banking interests. His birth occurred in Greenfield town- 
ship, Huron county, September 9, 1848. His father, Walter Keefer, was a na- 
tive of New York and in 1834 removed westward to Sandusky county, Ohio, re- 
siding in the vicinity of Bellevue, for a number of years. He afterward came to 
Huron county, but in a short time returned to Erie county, taking up his abode 
there in 1849. Five years later — in 1854 — he again came to Huron county and 
settled on a farm one-half mile from Chicago Junction, where he made his home 
until his death which occurred in 1896, when he was eighty-six years of age. In 
politics, he was a stanch republican, believing firmly in the principles of the 
party and he was a splendid type of the pioneer citizen who recognizes and util- 
izes the opportunities for the county's development as well as for the attainment 
of his own success. His wife bore the maiden name of Lydia Wiles and was a 
representative of a family that was established in Sandusky county, at an early 
epoch in its development. Later, her father, Storey Wiles, removed with his 
wife and children to Huron county, taking up his abode north of Chicago Junc- 
tion, where he spent his remaining days, his death there occurring. Unto the 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Keefer, there were born four sons and one 
daughter, who are yet living — all residents of Huron county — and three sons 
who died in infancy. 

At the usual age, W. B. Keefer began his education as a pupil in the com- 
mon schools and later, he continued his studies in Norwalk, being thus well 
qualified for life's practical and responsible duties. After putting aside his text- 
books, he learned telegraphy and was employed by the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road Company for two and a half years. In 1875, when the subject of estab- 



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W. B. KEEFER 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 311 

lishing a postoffice was under discussion he wrote to the postmaster general, 
urging the claims of this village and suggesting the name of Chicago for the 
new office. His suggestion was acted upon and he was appointed the first post- 
moster of the new town, entering upon his duties in 1875. He continued to fill 
the office until 1888 and during that time he opened and carried on a jewelry 
store. In the latter year, realizing the possibilities for business development 
here, he opened a private bank which he conducted successfully until 1905. It 
was then reorganized as a state bank under the name of the Commercial Bank 
Company, of which Mr. Keefer was elected president, with E. W. Severnance 
as vice-president ; W. K. Southard, cashier and W. M. Griffin, assistant cashier. 
Mr. Keefer now devotes his entire time to the bank. A general banking busi- 
ness is conducted and he has familiarized himself with every department of the 
work and makes the enterprise one of success. It has enjoyed a continuous 
growth from the beginning and well merits the liberal patronage which is ac- 
corded it. 

In 1883, Mr. Keefer completed his arrangements for having a home of his 
own in his marriage to Miss Eva L. Shepard, a native of Seneca county, Ohio, 
who in her girlhood days accompanied her parents, Israel and Nancy Shepard, 
on their removal to Hillsdale, Michigan. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Keefer was born 
a son, W. Dale, whose birth occurred July 9, 1890, and who died June 6, 1894. 
Mr. Keefer is well known in Masonic circles, taking the degrees of the lodge, 
chapter and commandery. His life record may well constitute an example and a 
source of inspiration to his fellowmen. He has made for himself a splendid name 
by reason of his industry and integrity, which have brought him success and the 
respect of his fellow citizens. The town of Chicago Junction is largely a monu- 
ment to his business ability and enterprising spirit for, with several associates, 
he has been closely identified with its upbuilding and progress from the outset 
to the present time. 



JACOB SCHREINER. 

Jacob Schreiner, a general farmer and stockman of Greenfield township, Hu- 
ron county, owns the one hundred acres of land on which he lives and fifty-six 
acres in another part of the township. He was born in Seneca county, Ohio, Octo- 
ber 19, 1862, and is the son of Michael and Mary (Koby) Schreiner, both of whom 
are of German birth. Michael Schreiner was fourteen when he went to Sen- 
eca county to fight the battle of life for himself. In the company of a few friends 
he worked around for different farmers in Seneca county for some time and then 
sent for his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Schreiner, to come to the new world 
and make their home. This they did and passed the remainder of their days in 
the county to which their son had become attached. Michael Schreiner, Jr., always 
followed farming in Center township, in Seneca county, where he owns one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land. Of late years he has retired from the active pur- 
suits and at the age of seventy-seven enjoys the comforts and rest he so well de- 
serves at the home of his daughter in Norwalk. He was prominent in local af- 



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312 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

fairs, held several township offices and has ever been a devoted adherent of the 
Catholic religion. His wife was one year old when her parents removed to Sen- 
eca county, where she continued to live all her life, dying there in 1906 at the 
age of sixty-two. She was a dutiful wife and a mother of the following children : 
Joseph, who lives at Chicago Junction, Ohio; Mary, who married Anthony 
Scheibley of Seneca county ; Jacob, of this review ; Peter, a resident of Fostoria, 
Ohio; Addie, deceased; Rose, the wife of Tony Hasselbauch, of Bellevue, Ohio; 
Philomina, the wife of Louis Schwartz, a prominent business man of Chicago, 
Ohio; Elizabeth, the widow of Andrew Nejedly; Martin, who lives at Akron, 
Ohio; Catherine, the wife of Lewis Steinmetz, of Fostoria, Ohio; Thresia, who 
married Andrew Adelman, of Norwalk, Ohio ; Louisa, the wife of William Huff- 
man, of Tiffin, Ohio ; and Aggie, who married a Mr. Smith of Iowa. Two children 
died in infancy. 

Jacob Schreiner lived in Seneca county until 1884, and received his education 
in the schools there. He early devoted himself to farming and until he was twenty- 
two years of age continued in that occupation, after which he was engaged in the 
hotel business at Bellevue, Fostoria, Zanesville and Chicago Junction. His oper- 
ations met with success but in the spring of 1907 he sold his interests in the hotel 
and cafe at Chicago Junction and came to Greenfield township, Huron county, 
where he purchased from Jennie Wheeler his present farm. Since he has assumed 
possession of this land he has greatly improved it, adding many modern con- 
veniences to his fine house, making the barns more up-to-date and instituting 
many changes in the methods of farming which will increase the productiveness 
of the soil. His farm is well stocked with all things necessary for the prosecu- 
tion of a successful business, and his animals are of the finest. 

Mr. Schreiner has been married twice, his first union being with Miss Josephine 
Ball, and they had three children: Mary, Peter, deceased; and William. Mrs. 
Josephine Schreiner was divorced, and Mr. Schreiner afterward married Mrs. 
Flora Huntington, who by her former marriage had one daughter, Sadie, now 
the wife of William G. Ramsey, by whom she has a son, Russell Jacob. Mrs. 
Schreiner is a daughter of Emanuel F. and Sarah (Thompson) Grames, of Chi- 
cago Junction, who were old settlers of this county but are now deceased. They 
had five children who lived to maturity : Frank, William, Flora, Henry and Minnie, 
and others who did not survive the period of infancy. In politics Mr. Schreiner 
gives his support to the democratic party and in religious matters to the Catholic 
church of Chicago Junction. Though so recently a citizen of Greenfield township, 
he bids fair to be one of her prosperous farmers and one of her most public-spir- 
ited men. 



ADOLF P. ERF. 



Adolf P. Erf, successfully engaged in agriculture in Lyme township, Huron 
county, comes from an old and prominent family of this county. He was born 
upon the farm which is now his home June 22, 1867, a son of Anthony and Marie 
(Maurer) Erf. He comes of German and Swiss lineage, his father having been 
born in Freien Dietz, Germany, June 20, 1843, while his mother was a native of 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 313 

Switzerland. The paternal grandparents of our subject, Jacob and Katherine Erf, 
sailed for the new world from Germany about 1859, an d> coming direct to Ohio, 
settled in this county, casting in their lot with the pioneer settlers of this district 
and aiding in reclaiming the wild land for agricultural purposes. Mr. Erf at once 
started to clear the land, built a dwelling for his family, and here he and his wife 
resided until they were called to their final rest. 

Their son Anthony Erf, the father of our subject, was sixteen years of age 
when he accompanied his parents on their journey to the United States and was 
thus early identified with the work of improvement and cultivation which was go- 
ing on at that time in the section of Ohio where they settled. He assisted his father 
in establishing a home here, where the remaining years of his life were spent, for 
after his father's demise he took charge of the home farm and continued the work 
of improvement. He became a well known and respected citizen of this county, 
having served for several terms as trustee of Lyme township. He was a faithful 
and consistent member of the Evangelical church of Monroeville, honorable and 
upright in his relations with his fellowmen. He met his death by drowning in a 
creek near his place while returning home after attending to a little matter of 
business. When he failed to appear at his home a search was made for him and 
his body found several days later. He had fallen into the water and it was thought 
that, owing to an injury to one of his arms, which he had sustained shortly before, 
he was unable to rescue himself, after having vainly attempted to do so — a fact 
which was manifest by certain marks left on the bank where he had endeavored to 
pull himself out of the water. He had gone to pay a threshing bill and still had ten 
dollars in his pocket after paying the bill. His wife had previously passed away 
in 1871, leaving, besides her husband, five children, Edward, William, Gustave, 
Adolf and Albert, the last named having since passed away. After the death of his 
first wife Mr. Erf was again married, his second union being with Miss Minnie 
Frenz, who, by her marriage, became the mother of five children, Hiram, Otto, 
George, Amelia and Louise. 

On the old homestead which had been the property of his grandfather, Adolf 
P. Erf was reared amid the scenes and environment of rural life, devoting the 
days of his boyhood and youth to the acquirement of an education as a pupil of the 
district schools of Lyme township and of Monroeville. He early became familiar 
with the tasks that fall to the lot of the farm lad and as the years passed and his 
strength increased he aided more and more fully in the work of the fields, becom- 
ing familiar with the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting. He re- 
mained at home until twenty-six years of age when, on the 28th of December, 
1894, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Beiler, a daughter of Henry and 
Philibina Beiler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erf began their domestic life in Richfield township, this county, 
where they resided for five years on a farm of sixty acres near Bellevue, which Mr. 
Erf purchased and operated. He then sold this property and in 1906 bought from 
the estate his present farm, which was a part of the original homestead. He later 
acquired forty additional acres from Robert Truman, his holdings now aggregat- 
ing one hundred and sixty-five acres, fourteen acres of which are located in Sher- 
man township. He has directed his energies to the improvement of this place and 



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314 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

his good management and modern methods have combined to make of it an excel- 
lent farm, returning to him abundant crops. 

As the years came and went three children were added to the household of Mr. 
and Mrs. Erf, but the first two died in infancy. The third and only surviving mem- 
ber is Olga, born November 20, 1901, who is the light and life of the home. Mr. 
Erf is connected with the Lutheran church of Pontiac and at all times holds to high 
and manly principles. He has been most successful in his agricultural pursuits, 
this success being but the visible evidence of well directed energies and good judg- 
ment combined with strict business integrity. Having passed his entire life in this 
district, he has become widely known throughout the county, and that he is most 
respected and honored where he is best known is indicative of the fact that at all 
times his salient characteristics are such as win esteem, trust and good will from all 
classes. 



WILLIAM GRAHAM. 



Through the years of an active and useful life William Graham was identified 
with carpentering and farming, being recognized in Huron county as one of its 
worthy and respected citizens, arriving here in the period of early manhood. He 
was born in England, in January, 1835, an d was a son of John Graham of that 
country. He spent the first nineteen years of his life in the land of his birth and 
during that period acquired his early education in the public schools. The favor- 
able reports which he heard concerning America and the business opportunities 
here afforded led him to the determination to seek his fortune on the western side 
of the Atlantic, and acting on this resolution he came to the United States mak- 
ing his way at once to Huron county, Ohio. In early life he learned and followed 
the carpenter's trade, being identified with building operations here until soon after 
his marriage, when he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits. 

In November, 1859, Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. 
Lowther, who was born in Huron county in February, 1839, and is a daughter of 
Edward and Martha (Lovell) Lowther. Her paternal grandparents were Henry 
and Sarah Lowther, in whose family were three children, Edward, Thomas and 
William. The Lovvthers were among the early settlers of Huron county, establish- 
ing their home here in pioneer times when much of the land was still undeveloped, 
being covered with the native forest growth. Edward Lowther assisted in the 
arduous task of transforming the wild timber region into cultivated fields and for a 
long period was closely identified with agricultural interests. Having arrived at 
years of maturity he married Miss Martha Lovell, a daughter of David and Mary 
(Chilcott) Lovell, in whose family were three daughters and a son, Martha, Ra- 
chel, Eleanor and Ethan. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lowther was 
blessed with nine children, namely: Sarah, Mariette, Isabella, Jackson, David, 
Helen. Martha, James and Thomas. Of this family Sarah gave her hand in mar- 
riage to Mr. Graham in 1859. and as the years passed they became the parents of 
a son and daughter. Lewis, the elder, born in 1865, married Jessie Watts, and 
they have two sons, William and Bruce. Martha, born in 1869, is the wife of Mor- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 315 

ris Tilson, and the mother of five children, Maud, Irving, Graham, Gardner and 
Murray. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. Graham ceased to engage in carpentering and 
turned his attention to the task of tilling the soil, becoming owner of a tract of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Fairfield township. Year after year he diligently 
carried on the work of the fields, raising the cereals best adapted to soil and cli- 
mate. That his methods were practical and progressive is indicated in the large 
crops which he gathered and also in the well kept appearance of his farm. In all of 
his business affairs he was thoroughly reliable and his integrity stood as an unques- 
tioned fact in his career. He was a member of the Universalist church and gave 
his political allegiance to the democracy but did not seek nor desire office, prefer- 
ring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. He died May, 1907, and 
is still survived by his widow, Mrs. Sarah E. Graham, who yet makes her home 
in Fairfield township. She has always lived in this county and has a very wide ac- 
quaintance, while the warm friendship of many with whom she has come in con- 
tact is freely accorded her. 



JOHN LAWLER. 



John Lawler, devoting his time and energies to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of his farm of one hundred acres in Lyme township, is a worthy native son 
of this county, his birth having occurred in Lyme township on the 25th of Decem- 
ber, 1857. His parents, Thomas and Sarah (Lawler) Lawler, were both natives 
of Ireland, born in the years 1825 and 1834 respectively. It was about 1850 that 
Thomas Lawler crossed the Atlantic to the United States and took up his abode in 
Huron county, working as a farm hand in Lyme township for a time. Subse- 
quently he purchased a tract of ninety-one acres of land in the same township, in 
the cultivation and improvement of which he was successfully engaged until the time 
of his demise in 1882. In religious faith he was a Catholic and his honorable, up- 
right life won him the warm regard and esteem of many with whom he came in 
contact. His widow still survives and is well known throughout the community 
as a lady of many excellent traits of heart and mind. Unto this worthy couple 
were born nine children, namely: John, of this review; and Edward, Thomas, 
Patrick, Michael, Joseph, Mary, Margaret and Sarah, all of whom are deceased, 
with exception of Mary. 

John Lawler obtained a good practical education in the district schools of 
his native township and has always continued to reside here, following the occupa- 
tion of farming as a life work. In 1905 he bought his present place of one han- 
dred acres from his father-in-law and has met with a gratifying and well merited 
measure of prosperity in his agricultural interests, the fields annually yielding 
golden harvests in return for the care and labor which he bestows upon them. 

On the 7th of April, 1891, Mr. Lawler was united in marriage to Miss Cath- 
arine Winzerl, who was born in Lyme township in April, 1864. Her parents, John 
and Eliza (Kehoe) Winzerl, were natives of Germany and Ireland respectively, 
the former having come to America in 1848, while the latter crossed the Atlantic 



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316 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

in 1851. Both were employed on farms for some time, but after their marriage, 
in 1861, Mr. Winzerl purchased a farm of one hundred acres in Lyme township, 
where they continued to make their home until called from this life. They were 
Catholics in religious faith and were the parents of three children, namely : John ; 
Catharine, wife of our subject ; and Julia, deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lawler 
have been born five children: Joseph, John, Sadie, Wilfred and Loretta, all at 
home. The parents are devoted and faithful members of the Catholic church and 
are well known and highly esteemed throughout the county in which they spent 
their entire lives. 



FRANK B. GANNETT. 



Frank B. Gannett, a well known, successful and enterprising agriculturist of 
Fairfield township, was born in the state of New York on the 15th of February, 
1869. When a little lad of six years he was adopted by Thomas Gannett, who 
had no children of his own and whose farm he inherited at the time of Mr. Gan- 
nett's death in 1901. Thomas Gannett, whose birth occurred in England in Sep- 
tember, 1845, devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits 
throughout his active business career. It was in 1866 that he took up his abode 
on a farm in Fairfield township, Huron county, Ohio, having purchased the 
pioperty from James Buck, of Norwalk. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Emma Sweet, was born in England in 1834. They were well known and 
highly esteemed throughout the community as people of genuine personal worth 
and upright, honorable lives. 

Frank B. Gannett attended the schools of North Fairfield in the acquirement 
of an education that would equip him for the practical and responsible duties of 
life. Since putting aside his text-books he has given his attention to the work 
of general farming, in which line of activity he has won a gratifying and well 
merited degree of prosperity, being the owner of one hundred and forty acres 
of rich and productive land in Fairfield township. This is the oldest farm in the 
township and on it was erected the first frame house in Fairfield. The place 
is now equipped with a number of substantial buildings, which are kept in a state 
of excellent repair, and in addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate Mr. Gannett also feeds sheep, hogs and cattle on quite an extensive scale. 
He likewise engages in the sale of machine oils and all lubricating oils, which he 
supplies through three townships, disposing of about one hundred and fifty bar- 
rels annually. In all of his business affairs he is alert and enterprising, meeting 
with the measure of success which always rewards earnest, persistent and well 
directed labor. 

In September, 1898, Mr. Gannett was united in marriage to Miss Georgina 
Duncan, whose birth occurred in Ontario, Canada, on the 4th of April, 1862. 
Her father, Robert Duncan, who was born on the 10th of May, 1828, passed 
away June 10, 1903. He was of Scotch descent and made his home at Bluevale, 
Ontario, of which town his father was one of the first settlers. The mother of 
Mrs. Gannett was born in 1829 and was a second cousin of Sir John A. Mc- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 319 

Donald, the premier of Canada. Her demise occurred on the 7th of April, 1907. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gannett now have two children, namely: Norman Thomas, born 
February 28, 1902; and Robert Duncan, who first opened his eyes to the light 
of day on the 18th of March, 1904. A resident of this county for more than a 
third of a century, Mr. Gannett is widely known within its borders and the sub- 
stantial qualities which he has displayed in his citizenship and in his business re- 
lations have gained him a high place in the regard and good will of his fellow 
townsmen. 



C. E. WARD. 



Success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, but is the outcome of clear 
judgment, experience and indefatigable energy. This truth is manifest in an 
analyzation of the life record of all those men who are pushing their way to the 
front and seeking their advancement in the legitimate lines of trade. It is proven 
again in the history of C. E. Ward, a prominent regalia manufacturer of New Lon- 
don, where he has developed a business of large and profitable proportions, utiliz- 
ing every advantage that has come to hand and carefully watchful of all details 
pointing to success. 

Ohio numbers Mr. Ward among her native sons, his birth having occurred 
in Sullivan, Ashland county, on the 9th of January, 1873. His parents were Jacob 
and Ellen (Hubler) Ward, who were also natives of this state, the Hubler family 
coming from Pennsylvania at an early day. C. E. Ward was one of three children 
and an only son. He lost his mother when five years of age and in early life was 
thrown upon his own resources. His educational opportunities were those afforded 
by the public schools of New London but the necessity of providing for his own 
support prevented him from obtaining a higher education. He is essentially a 
self-made man, one who has risen from the humble position of a clerkship in a 
grocery store to the head of an extensive, prosperous and growing manufacturing 
concern at the age of thirty-six years, an accomplishment which speaks for itself. 
He made his initial step in the business world as a grocery clerk, being thus em- 
ployed for a few years when as a result of his industry, integrity and foresight, 
he was enabled to engage in business on his own account as a dealer in furniture. 

The Regalia Manufacturing business which "has made New London famous" 
was established in a very modest way by W. S. Bellville and R. B. Powers in 1889 
and after a short time, they sold out to W. E. Clemmons and S. O. Curtis. On 
the 13th of July, 1895, Mr. Ward purchased the interest of Mr. Curtis and car- 
ried on a business in partnership with Mr. Clemmons. The manufacturing depart- 
ment was conducted upstairs in connection with the furniture business below. In 
January, 1904, Mr. Clemmons was about to sell his interest to Mr. Powers, but 
before the deal was consummated, Mr. Ward induced him to sell to E. R. Stillson 
and in connection with the latter carried on the business as Ward & Stillson, until 
September 19, 1905, when Mr. Stillson bought out Mr. Ward's interest and organ- 
ized an incorporated company under the title of the Ward Stillson Company. 
Mr. Ward then erected his present manufactory and organized the C. E. Ward 



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320 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Company, of which he is president while his father is vice-president. He com- 
menced business under this style October i, 1905, in the manufacture of regalia 
and the enterprise has grown enormously, the rapid development of the trade 
being indicated in the fact that this year's business will reach over a quarter of a 
million dollars. They employ a superior class of help, both male and female, and 
the firm is represented on the road by seven traveling salesmen while the business 
extends throughout the United States and Canada. Mr. Ward is a bright, genial 
man, energetic, far-sighted and progressive and while his success is notable it is 
equally well deserved. 

In 1895, occurred the marriage of Mr. Ward and Miss Daisy E. White, a 
daughter of Daniel White, an old resident of New London and a Civil war vet- 
eran. Mr. Ward's father was also a Union soldier, serving with the Twenty- 
fifth Independent Battery of the Light Artillery. Two children, Sterling and 
Virginia, have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Ward and with the parents constitute 
the members of the household. Mr. Ward is a valued representative of the 
Masonic fraternity in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scot- 
tish Rite. He is also connected with other orders and while he is no office seeker, 
his business interests preclude the possibility of active participation in public 
affairs as an office holder. He is an ardent republican, stands for clean govern- 
ment and is opposed to anything like misrule in municipal affairs. He concen- 
trates his energies upon his business, which demands his entire time and in its 
control, he displays marked executive ability, keen discernment and a power of 
wisely co-ordinating forces so as to produce an unified and harmonious whole. His 
business has been notably successful for within a brief period he has built up an 
enterprise second to no productive industry in New London or this part of the 
county. 



S. J. RUMMELL. 



S. J. Rummell, carrying on general agricultural pursuits, his time and energies 
being devoted to the further development, cultivation and improvement of a farm 
of sixty-three acres of land, is numbered among the native sons of Ohio, his birth 
having occurred in Ottawa county on the 1st of March, 1856, a son of Sebastian 
and Applelona (Diehl) Rummell. As a boy he was reared amid the wholesome 
influence and environment of rural life and later his time was largely divided be- 
tween the work of the schoolroom and the duties of the fields. Arriving at years 
of maturity, he wisely chose as his life work the occupation to which he had been 
reared and has largely devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. He has, how- 
ever, in the past given some attention to painting and butchering but is now en- 
gaged in general farming. His place of sixty-three acres has a well kept appear- 
ance and the fields, which he has brought under a high state of cultivation, annually 
bring forth rich harvests. He practices rotation of crops, while the work of 
plowing, planting and harvesting is systematically done, due attention being given 
to the condition and quality of the soil. 

In 1880 Mr. Rummell was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Vogus, a daughter 
of Fred Vogus, and unto this union have been born the following children : Mandy, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 321 

Fred, Anna, Nettie, Ida, Laura, Albert and Albertina. In politics Mr. Rummell is 
a stanch democrat, giving loyal support to the principles of that party and doing 
all in his power to extend its influence in the community. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Catholic church and are highly respected for their many good 
traits of character. Mr. Rummell has never sought to figure prominently in a pub- 
lic way, preferring always to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs 
which, carefully conducted, are bringing to him gratifying returns. Although he 
has lived in this locality only nine years, he nevertheless has gained a wide circle of 
friends who entertain for him warm regard. 



CHARLES W. ABBEY. 



Charles W. Abbey is cultivating a farm of ninety-three acres in Norwalk town- 
ship and is a farmer whose well directed energy and keen foresight are bringing 
to him a creditable measure of prosperity. He was born in the northern peninsula 
of Michigan on the 24th of August, 1849, a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Todd) 
Abbey. On the paternal side he comes of Welsh lineage, the line of descent ex- 
tending down from John Abbey, through his son Shuble, who married Sarah San- 
ford and in turn became the father of Aaron Abbey, who was born September 10, 
1825, in Ashtabula county, Ohio. The mother of our subject was born in Bui- 
falo, New York, November 14, 1829, and is a daughter of Augustus and Arna 
(Cole) Todd. On both the paternal and maternal sides the men have been long- 
lived, Shuble Abbey, the grandfather of our subject, having lived to the venerable 
age of ninety-six years. He was extremely active during his entire life and when 
eighty-five years old climbed a chestnut tree and shook down the nuts. Henry 
Francisco, the great-great-grandfather, lived to the remarkable age of one hun- 
dred and thirty-four years. He was of French descent and resided in New York. 
When one hundred years old he plowed with a yoke of oxen, and at the age of four- 
teen years he played the bugle at the coronation of Queen Anne. In the family 
of Aaron Abbey and his wife were five children : Henry A., Albert A., Charles W., 
Edward A. and Walter S. 

As a farm boy Charles W. Abbey spent the days of boyhood and youth and in 
the public schools he acquired a fair education that qualified him to take up the 
more responsible duties of life when he put aside the tasks of the schoolroom. 
He remained at home until about eighteen years of age, when he purchased the 
farm upon which he now resides and started out in business on his own account. 
He has made this farm his home for forty-two years and in the meantime has 
brought it under a fine state of cultivation. He is up-to-date and progressive in his 
methods and his well directed energy and close application to business have been 
the means of bringing to him a most gratifying degree of success. 

Mr. Abbey was united in marriage on the 1st of May, 1872, to Miss Matilda 
Florence Lockwood, a daughter of Eli and Anna (Howarth) Lockwood, of Hu- 
ron county. Their home has been blessed with one son, Bernard, who was born 
February 3, 1875, and married Miss Orpha Allman. Fraternally Mr. Abbey is a 
Mason and holds membership in a Michigan lodge, while his son, Bernard, belongs 



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322 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

to the Elks and the Maccabees of Norwalk. He is independent in politics and is 
governed by the character of the candidates rather than by any feeling of par- 
tisanship. He is not neglectful of the responsibilities as well as the privileges of 
citizenship, but at all times lends his aid to further any measure which has for its 
object the substantial and permanent upbuilding and welfare of the community. 
As he has made his home for many years in Huron county, he has a wide acquain- 
tance here and his friends know him as an enterprising agriculturist and a man of 
genuine personal worth. 



E. W. SMITH. 



E. W. Smith, a well known and prominent farmer and horse dealer of Ripley 
township, may well claim the proud American title of a self-made man, inasmuch 
as the prosperity which he now enjoys has been won entirely through his own ef- 
forts and has come as the result of indefatigable industry and well directed energy. 
Born on the 16th of February, 1865, in this township, he is a son of Otis and Mary 
Jane (Welsh) Smith, the former born in Onondaga county, New York, in 1832, 
while the latter's birth occurred in Ripley township, Huron county, in 1838. The 
paternal grandfather, Henry Smith, was born in New York in 1800 and came to 
Ohio at an early date, purchasing the farm upon which our subject now resides in 
1840. He married Caroline Redfield, and in their family were the following chil- 
dren : Otis, Henry, Jane and two who passed away in infancy. The mother of our 
subject was the daughter of Nicholas V. and Susan (Styles) Welsh, and was the 
eldest in a family of four children, the others being Peter, John and Rachel. Nich- 
olas Welsh was born in 1819 in Maryland and is a son of John Welsh. His 
grandfather, John Welsh, Sr., was the founder of the family in America, com- 
ing from Wales when nineteen years of age and locating in Maryland. The family 
was numbered among the slave traders of that state at one time, but upon their 
removal to Ohio they freed all of their slaves. Mr. Welsh, like many other south- 
erners, was raised by an old black mammy. The family of Otis Smith and his wife 
consisted of five children, namely, Warren, Charles, Ralph, E. W. and Verna. 

Amid the scenes and environments of agricultural life E. W. Smith was reared 
to manhood, acquiring his education in the district schools, and when not engaged 
with his text-books he assisted his father in the work of the fields, his training in 
general farming being most thorough and comprehensive. He remained at home 
until he attained his majority and then started out in business for himself. Most of 
his life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits and he now owns a fine farm 
of one hundred and ninety-eight acres of land which, in its well improved and at- 
tractive appearance, indicates the thrift and progressiveness of its owner. For ten 
years, however, he operated a livery and sale stable in Plymouth, and he now deals 
in horses, making a specialty of breeding trotters. He has been very successful in 
his various undertakings and is now ranked among the substantial and representa- 
tive agriculturists of Huron county. 

It was on the 19th of August, 1885, that Mr. Smith was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella Watts, who was born in East Cleveland, Ohio, in January, 1866, a daugh- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 323 

ter of Frank and Elizabeth (Lester) Watts. She was the sister of Hattie, Sarah, 
Grace and Alberta Watts, and by her marriage to Mr. Smith became the mother of 
two sons: Forest, born in December, 1888; and Charles, born in May, 1897. The 
eldest son, who is a graduate of the Plymouth high school, taught school for several 
years and in the fall of 1909 entered the Ohio State University. The family are 
members of the Methodist church of Plymouth, and are people of high repute in 
the community in which they reside. 

Mr. Smith holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
in politics is a stalwart republican, giving his unwavering support to that party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Although he has confined 
his attention closely to business, yet he has found time to interest himself in those 
affairs which should always claim the attention of every good citizen, and his in- 
fluence is ever on the side of progress, improvement, reform and advancement. 
His has been a life of continuous activity in which has been accorded due recogni- 
tion of honest labor, and in this community, where he has resided throughout his 
entire lifetime, he has gained an extensive circle of warm friends, who entertain 
for him high regard, while the fact that he is most liked where best known indicates 
that his salient characteristics are in accord with the principles of honorable and 
upright manhood. 



HORACE B. SILLIMAN. 

One of the prosperous farmers of Ripley township and one of the extensive 
landholders, is Horace B. Silliman. Although not one of Ohio's native sons he 
early saw the great agricultural possibilities of the state and for more than half 
a century, has made it his home. He wias born in Fairfield county, Connecti- 
cut, September 13, 1832, and is the son of Joseph and Lucinda (Banks) Silliman. 
The Silliman family is of Dutch and English descent, but has for several genera- 
tions been connected with the life of this country. The father, Joseph Silliman, 
was born in 1790 in the county that was later the birthplace of his son and was the 
eldest of the family of nine that were born of the union of Justice Silliman and 
Miss Ruth Jennings. The other children were : Abijah, Darnel, Stephen, Sarah, 
Ruth, Abigail, Marinda and Isaac. Mrs. Lucinda Silliman was also born in 
Fairfield county, Connecticut, but was two years younger than her husband, 
her birth having occurred in the year 1792. She was the daughter of Thomas 
Banks and his wife and the sister of Jane, Amelia, Sarah, Esther and Rachel. 
Through her marriage with Joseph Silliman she became the mother of three 
children: Horace B., George and Sarah Eliza. 

Horace B. Silliman first came to Ohio in 1849, when he was but seventeen years 
of age and remained but ten months staying with his brother George who was a 
resident of Fairfield. The impressions formed on this visit, however, were so 
favorable, that he returned to his home with the intention of disposing of his 
property as quickly as possible and coming again to this state, which though not 
as well developed as at present, seemed to offer great opportunities, especially to 
the man who was willing to work. In 1855, he sold his property in Connecti- 



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324 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

cut and came to Ripley township, where he purchased the one hundred and 
eighty-four acres on which he now lives. The years have proved the wisdom 
of his decision. He has been more successful than he had even dared to hope; 
the land brought him rich harvests, and when he engaged in the stock business, 
it too prospered, so that he has been able from time to time to add to his origi- 
nal land holdings until he now has three hundred and forty acres in Ripley town- 
ship. 

In the April of the year preceding his advent to Ohio, that of 1854, Mr. Silli- 
man married Miss Abigail Hawkins, who was born August 20, 1833, in Fairfield 
county, Connecticut, and is a dru^hter of Eben and Clara (Wakeman) Hawkins. 
The parents had a family of eight children, of whom Mrs. Silliman is the youngest 
The others were Burr, William, Elihu, Arella, Sarah, Mary and Adaline. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Silliman have been born eleven children : Georgiana, William, Frank, 
Dwight, Edward, Clara, Mary, Ella and three who died in infancy. 

In politics, Mr. Silliman affiliates with the democratic party and has taken 
a vital interest in the affairs of the township, having served for a number of 
years as trustee and at several different times as assessor. He is also respon- 
sible to some degree for the financial stability of the county, for he was one of 
the founders of the Peopled Bank at Plymouth and the Farmers Bank at Green- 
wich, and since their establishment has been upon their boards of directors. Yet 
the position of esteem which he holds in the community is due entirely to his own 
efforts, because he seized opportunities when they presented themselves and made 
others whenever he saw the slightest possibility of gaining and advancing by 
them. Fraternally, he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and with the Royal Arcanum. 



ISABELLA CONGER. 



Isabella Conger, of Greenfield township, who is conducting the farm on the one 
hundred and fifty-one acres of land left by her husband, was born in this township, 
June 25, 1 83 1, and is a daughter of Edward and Martha (Lovell) Lowther. Her 
paternal grandfather, Henry Lowther, was born in Ireland and came to the United 
States at the time of the rebellion in his home land. He settled in New York state, 
became a farmer and acquired considerable property, which he lost by going bond 
for a friend. His son Edward Lowther, the father of Mrs. Conger, was born in 
New York city in 1800. At the age of seventeen he came west to Ohio, locating 
in Greenfield township, Huron county, where he purchased land and lived the re- 
mainder of his days. Captain Lowther he was generally called, for he was at one 
time captain of the militia and was otherwise prominent in his section of the coun- 
ty, for he held many township offices during the period of his residence here and 
was a conspicuous figure in the Universalist church. His life was brought to a 
close in 1886. His wife was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and came 
with her parents to Ohio when it was a dense forest and when Indians were fre- 
quent visitors to the homes of the white settlers. Quite a different county did she 
leave in 1887, when her eighty-one years of activity were ended by death. She 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 327 

became the mother of the following children: Thomas, deceased; Mariette, the 
widow of Ira Watterman; Isabella, of this sketch; Jackson, of Sherwood, Ohio; 
Sarah, the widow of William Graham; Helen, the deceased wife of Dexter Mason ; 
Martha, the wife of Barnett Rowe ; and James. 

Greenfield township has always been Mrs. Conger's home. She was born here 
in a little log house and in the district schools received such an education as they 
were able to give. She took part in the work that was carried on at the home 
farm, such work as a girl could do, and was about twenty years of age when she 
was sought in marriage by Lewis Conger, the son of Elijah and Hannah (Lud- 
low) Conger. Mr. Conger was born September 8, 1824, at Ludlowville, New 
York, and in 1833, came with his parents to Milan, Ohio, where he worked with his 
father in a mill until 1850, when the family moved to Greenfield township. In 
1870 Mr. Conger bought the farm on which his widow now lives from Jacob Nog- 
gle, and as it was in an almost rude state, the many improvements that it now 
possesses are to be laid to Mr. Conger's credit. 

On the 10th of February, 1853, Mr. Conger and Miss Lowther were united in 
the holy bonds of matrimony, and the forty-four years during which they were 
permitted to travese life's pathway together were blessed with four children. Ed- 
ward L., who lives in Greenfield township, married Miss Nellie Hall and has 
two children, May and Ray. Halsey died at the age of five months. Julia, now 
deceased, was the wife of Charles Palmer and the mother of two children, Florence 
and Charles. Lewis, who lives on the farm with his mother, was married to Miss 
Ada Daly, of Greenfield township and is the father of a daughter Isabelle. Mr. 
Conger was called to his final rest November 11, 1899, and during the subsequent 
years the son Lewis has taken full charge of the farm, has conducted its work and 
managed its finances. 



DANIEL JAY MORSE. 



Daniel Jay Morse is now living retired in North Fairfield but for many years 
was closely associated with farming interests in Huron county. Prospering as the 
years went by he acquired a handsome competence and when relieved of the neces- 
sity of further labor to provide a means of living, he took up his abode in town, 
there to enjoy the fruits of his former toil. He is not actively engaged in any busi- 
ness at the present time, save in loaning money. Few men have longer resided 
within the borders of the county than Mr. Morse, who is one of the native sons, 
his birth having occurred in Bronson township, on the 23d of March, 1836. There 
were still many evidences of pioneer life here at that time, for the railroads had 
not been built, much of the land was still uncultivated and through the dense 
forests roamed wild animals, while various kinds of wild game were to be seen. 
Great changes have since occurred and with the work of general progress and im- 
provement Mr. Morse has been identified. He comes of a family of English lin- 
eage. The first of the name of whom we have authentic record was John Morse, 
who was commissioned a captain in the Colonial army before the Revolutionary 
war by King George III, and the commission is still in possession of his descend- 



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328 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ents. At the time the colonies attempted to throw off the yoke of British oppres- 
sion he became allied with American interests and participated in the war for inde- 
pendence holding the rank of captain in the Continental army. His grandfather, 
Ezekiel Morse, was born in Massachusetts and went from New England to Roch- 
ester, New York, during the war of 1812. He fought with the American troops 
throughout the war and took up his abode in Rochester when it was a mere hamlet, 
he and his brother Enoch laying out the main street of the city. He was also one 
of the first aldermen of Rochester and was closely and prominently connected with 
the work of development and upbuilding during the formative period. At his 
death he was taken back to Rochester, where he was accorded a public burial by 
the city. 

Daniel S. Morse, the father of Daniel J. Morse, was born in Washington, Mas- 
sachusetts, and came to Huron county, Ohio, about 1820 or 1822, making the jour- 
ney by way of the lake to the town of Huron, where he hired an ox team and in that 
manner proceeded to Greenwich. He remained there for only a year, however, 
after which he settled upon a farm in Bronson township, where he remained until 
called to his final rest. This is the only farm in Bronson township that has never 
passed out of possession of the family nor never had a mortgage upon it. He dili- 
gently pursued his work in developing and improving his property and became rec- 
ognized as one of the leading agriculturists of the community. Moreover, he was 
a prominent and influential citizen and filled various positions of public trust in his 
township. He acted for at time as justice of the peace, his decisions being strictly 
fair and impartial and for twenty-six years prior to his death he was the trusted 
and reliable treasurer of the township. Both he and his wife were consistent mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, in the work of which he took an active and 
helpful part, serving for many years as one of the deacons and doing everything in 
his power to promote the growth and extend the influence of the society. In early 
manhood he had married Lucy Jeffords, also a native of Washington, Massa- 
chusetts, and they became the parents of nine children, Lois, Mary L., Edward, 
Daniel Jay, Laura, Theodore, Martha, Jacob and Ellen. Of this family Edward, 
Daniel and Jane are the only ones now living. The homestead of one hundred and 
twenty acres, which the father long owned and which he left at the time of his 
death, still remains undivided. 

Daniel Jay Morse was reared on the old home farm, early becoming familiar 
with all the duties and labors that fall to the lost of the agriculturist in his efforts 
to profitably till the soil. When but a boy he took his place in the fields as soon 
as old enough to handle the plow and continued to engage actively in general farm- 
ing until he retired from business life. His education was acquired in the public 
schools and in the school of experience he has also learned many valuable lessons. 
That his methods of farm work were practical and brought substantial results is 
indicated in the position to which he has attained among the men of affluence in 
the county. 

In 1859 Mr. Morse was united in marriage to Miss Orpha Watrous, a daugh- 
ter of Cyrus and Emily (Barber) Watrous, of Erie county, Ohio. Three children 
were born of that marriage: Charles Watrous, who was born in 1861 and is a rail- 
road man ; William S., born in 1865 ; and Emma, who was born in 1874 and is now 
deceased. Having lost his first wife, Mr. Morse was again married on the 22d of 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 329 

September, 1907, to Eva Belle Tremley, a daughter of William and Sarah Ann 
(Hoffmire) Tremley. Mr. and Mrs. Morse are now living in North Fairfield, 
he having sold his farm and taken up his abode in town, there to enjoy well earned 
rest. His money is now loaned out and he derives from his investments a good in- 
come. Both he and his wife are consistent members of the Methodist church. His 
life has always been honorable and upright and has ever been in conformity to a 
high standard of business principles. Neither has he been indifferent to good citi- 
zenship but has sought the good of the community through his cooperation in many 
public measures. He has lived to witness remarkable changes in the county, in- 
cluding the building of railroads, the introduction of the telegraph and the tele- 
phone, the adoption of all modern farm machinery and the employment of all mod- 
ern means for intellectual, aesthetic and moral progress as well. He rejoices in 
what has been accomplished and has given stalwart support to many movements 
which have been directly beneficial to this section of the state. 



FRANKLIN C. WOOD. 

Among the men of Greenwich village, distinguished for exceptional bravery 
is Franklin C. Wood, the town marshall, who was born November 1, 1877, in 
Cass township, Richland county, Ohio, and is a son of John W. and Mary E. 
(Darling) Wood. Both parents were also natives of that township, to which 
the paternal grandfather, James C. Wood, had come from New York state. He 
was among the early settlers there and cleared the land of the heavy timber with 
which it was covered. As the township grew he became prominent in its affairs, 
and was one of the four that organized the republican party in Cass township. 
He himself did not serve in the Civil war, but he sent four sons to fight for 
their country, two of whom died in the service. Kellum succumbed to disease 
while with his regiment; William died from the effects of a wound received in 
the battle of Bull Run ; Charles served four years and after tl^e war went to Kan- 
sas, where he died ; and Andrew was in the one hundred days' service, and still 
lives in Shiloh, Ohio. 

John W. Wood, the father of Franklin C. Wood, was too young to enlist. 
For many years, he was a farmer of Richland county and later of Huron county, 
and in the year 1906, removed to Greenwich village, where he has since resided 
with his family, pursuing the carpenter's trade. His wife's father. William E. 
Wood, was also an early settler in Cass township, Richland county, and was one 
of the four men who organized the republican party there. He was accidentally 
killed many years ago, by having his clothing caught in the tumbling rod of the 
old horse-p:)wer thresher. Mr. and Mrs. John W. Wad, became the parents of 
two children : Florence, who died in infancy ; and Franklin C, the subject of this 
sketch. 

As a young lad and into the period of his young manhood, Franklin C. Wood 
lived and worked on his father's farm, receiving his education at the district 
schools of the county. He later entered upon the life and work of farming, which 
he pursued for several years after his marriage, until 1906, when he came to 



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330 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Greenwich village. In August of the following year, he was appointed marshall 
to fill an unexpired term and in November was duly elected by popular vote to 
the same office for a term of two years. On more than one occasion, the people 
have had reason to congratulate themselves on the wisdom of their choice, for 
Mr. Wood has proved a most valuable officer, but perhaps never more than upon 
the morning of December 16, 1908, a day that has gone into the annals of the 
village, when Mr. Wood proved himself a man of stupendous courage and iron 
nerve. Even as he with all modesty recounts the occurrence, it is one that excites 
our admiration and wonder. In the early morning of December 16, 1908, while 
going upon his rounds, Mr. Wood encountered four men in the street, evidently 
intent upon robbing the banks of the village. Upon accosting them, he was led 
into a trap between some box cars standing on a side track, and then suddenly 
found that he was facing a brace of revolvers. He wtas ordered to throw up his 
hands, which he did, but his own revolver came up with them and one of the men 
fell dead from the shot which he pulled. This of course brought the remaining 
men upon him with renewed force ; they fired on him and then engaged in a hand 
to hand struggle, in the course of which he was overpowered and left for uncon- 
scious, the men retiring to some distance to look after their fallen comrade. He 
was not so much used up as appeared, however, but managed to get his guns into 
working order again, and doubtless would have ended the life of another man, 
had they not discovered his activity and pounced upon him with increased vin- 
dictiveness, jumping on him, kicking him and literally trampling him into the 
ground, where they left him to make their own escape. Unconscious he was in- 
deed this time, but with the passage of the hours soon gained sufficient power 
to drag himself to a pool of water from which he revived himself sufficiently to 
call for assistance. There was immediately great commotion, the wounded mar- 
shal was put aboard a fast Big Four train, flagged for the purpose, and hurried 
to the hospital at Galion, where for many days his life hung by a slender thread. 
After six weeks, he was pronounced to be able to leave the physician's care and to 
go to his home in Greenwich, but even there the period of his confinement to his 
bed was prolonged for three months longer. He is now able to be about town, 
though he is still very weak from the many thrilling experiences through which 
he has passed the last being the fourth that almost resulted in death to him, 
though the three preceding ones were merely accidental. On the occasion of the 
first, he was kicked severely by a horse, the second time a tree fell on him, and on 
the third, he was caught in some machinery. In each case, he wtas so badly in- 
jured, that his life was despaired of, but on each occasion, as on this most recent, 
he has pulled through. It is needless to say that the three assailants on the night 
of December 16, escaped, but he who was killed was identified by the Pinkerton 
Detective Agency, as Edward Quinn, a criminal with a long record, who was 
sought for in many cities. It is believed that it was the intention of the men to 
rob at least one of the banks of Greenwich, and in recognition of the marshal's 
bravery and opportune frustration of the robbers' operations, a purse of substan- 
tial size was presented to him. The Casualty and Security Company, which 
carried burglar insurance on the banks, and the Ohio Bankers' Association each 
* contributed one hundred dollars, and the subscriptions of the other banks and 
from the citzens of the village brought the sum up to twelve hundred and fifty- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 331 

four dollars, which was paid him as a slight appreciation of the value of his 
services. 

On the 12th of December, 1902, Mr. Wood was married to Miss Myrtle G. 
Martin, a daughter of Joseph and Julia (Weygant) Martin, of New London, 
where the father is living in retirement after an active life as a farmer. One child, 
Thelma G., has been born of this union. Mr. Wood and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and she is also a member of the Ladies of the 
Maccabees. To the Knights of the Maccabees, Mr. Wood belongs and to the 
Greenwich Lodge, No. 640, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In poli- 
tics, he is a republican and is an effective party worker. After the incident nar- 
rated above, it is but repetition to say that he is a man of unflinching nerve, of 
fixed determination, and one who believes in doing right, because it is right, and 
while these qualities are inestimable they are fully appreciated by Mr. Wood's 
fellow citizens, a knowledge and satisfaction that is afforded to but comparatively 
few persons. 



WILLIAM FRANKLIN DARLING. 

A well impoved farm of ninety acres pays tribute to the labor and care be- 
stowed upon it by William Franklin Darling, one of Ohio's native sons, whose 
birth occurred in Richland county, January 2, 1856. He is a son of William and 
Lydia (Shoup) Darling, both natives of Richland county, Ohio, the former born 
in 181 1. The father, who was the second white child born in that county, spent 
his entire life within its borders, passing away in 1874. He was twice married, 
his first union being with Miss Lydia Shoup, while for his second wife he chose 
Miss Leah Wagner, a native of Crawford county. Two children were born unto 
the first union, Mary and William F. 

No event of especial importance came to vary the routine of life for William 
Franklin Darling during the period of his boyhood and youth, which were spent 
on his father's farm amid the scenes and environments of rural life. He attended 
the district schools in the acquirement of his education, and under the capable di- 
rection of his father received thorough business training which well equipped him 
for the practical and responsible duties of life. He remained at home until his 
marriage and in the year following that event, he purchased the farm upon which 
he now resides and which has been in his possession for the past thirty-two years. 
He has directed his entire energies toward its further improvement, has brought 
his fields under a high state of cultivation and has erected substantial, modern 
buildings, while upon the place are found all of the conveniences and accessories 
that go to make up a model farm. In the management of his affairs, he manifests 
excellent business ability, and his close application and untiring industry are the 
salient elements in the prosperity which he now enjoys. 

Mr. Darling was united in marriage on the 30th of December, 1876, to Miss 
Catherine Wentz, who was born November 27, 1854, in Richland county, Ohio, 
her parents being Solomon and Catherine (Firewood) Wentz. She had three 
sisters and two brothers all younger than herself, namely: Mary, George, Anna, 



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332 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Clara and Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Darling became the parents of three children, as 
follows : Effie, who was born in 1877, and married Joseph Hodge, by whom she has 
three children: Adon, Alice and Martha; Pearl, whose birth occurred in 1884; 
and Mary, born in 1890. The family are members of the Lutheran church at 
Shiloh, Ohio, in the work of which they are interested and to the support of which 
they are generous contributors. Mr. Darling gives his political allegiance to the 
republican party, but has no desire for office, preferring to concentrate his time 
and energies upon his business interests in which he is meeting with signal suc- 
cess, being now ranked among the enterprising and progressive agriculturists of 
Ripley township. 



CALVIN WHITNEY. 



The life record of Calvin Whitney was beautiful in its symmetry, in its pur- 
poses and its accomplishments. In him keen discernment and powers of manage- 
ment were well balanced with a charitable spirit and broad humanitarianism. Be- 
cause of this his work was of the utmost value in the public life of Norwalk and 
his history constitutes an important chapter in the annals of the city. He was 
born in Townsend, Huron county. Ohio, September 25, 1846, and was one of the 
six children of Charles and Roxanna (Palmer) Whitney. The father's birth oc- 
curred in Shelby, Richland county. Ohio, on the 23d of September, 1812, and his 
father was Henry Whitney, who was born in 1791 in Norwalk, Connecticut. 
There he married Miss Lucy Grumman ?.nd in 1819 they made their way to the 
western border of civilization — for so it then seemed — and settled in Shelby, Rich- 
land county. The family is of English origin and was founded in this country by 
Henry Whitney, who emigrated irom England, where he was born, about 1620 
He became one of the early residents of New England where his family was rep- 
resented for successive generations in the vicinity of Norwalk, Connecticut, until 
the removal to the west was made by Henry Whitney, who was the first of the 
name in Ohio. 

Calvin Whitney in his boyhood days worked on the home farm and attended 
the country schools. He was apt and diligent in his studies, manifesting special 
fondness for mathematics and, encouraged by a loving mother, he mastered the 
elements of an English education and at the age of fifteen was much better equipped 
by mental training for the duties of life than most boys of his age. Lessons 
of industry, perseverance and integrity were also impressed upon his mind and 
in the course of years bore rich fruit. He was but eighteen years of age when he 
started out in life on his own account, undertaking the task of operating a small 
farm on the shares, but a hail storm ruined his crops and he concluded that Prov- 
idence did not intend him to follow farming. Therefore, in 1865 with his capital 
amounting to about four hundred dollars, he embarked in the hardwood lumber 
business, in which he soon established a credit and by which he won success from 
the start. His patronage grew rapidly until his sales aggregated about two hun- 
dred thousand doliars annually. He possessed superior ability for judging and 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 335 

buying lumber and because of this was enabled to make judicious investments 
and profitable sales. 

In the fall of 1875 tne A. B. Chase Company was organized in Norwalk and 
on account of Mr. Whitney's superior knowledge of the lumber business, his rec- 
ord as an executive and the fact that he was a rising young business man of keen 
discrimination, his cooperation was sought as one of the incorporators of the 
company, which was organized for the manufacture of reed organs with a capital 
stock of fifty thousand dollars. Mr. Whitney became one of its first directors and 
so continued until April, 1877, when on the death of A. B. Chase, he was elected 
the president of the A. B. Chase Company and continuously occupied that posi- 
tion until his demise. He saw the business grow from a comparatively small be- 
ginning to one of extensive proportions and in foreign lands as well as in America 
its product has a large sale. In what manner Mr. Whitney filled the presidency 
and caused a newly organized business company to be recognized as among the 
responsible, respected and prominent industries of the United States, is history 
with which nearly every one in Norwalk and every piano man in the country is 
familiar. A man of great versatility he readily adapted himself to changed con- 
ditions and to widely different lines of business — and always with success. The 
word fail had no place in his vocabulary. He knew that when one avenue of 
advancement seemed closed there were other paths which might be sought out 
and followed and he never relinquished an honorable purpose. 

On the 5th of November, 1868, occurred the marriage of Calvin Whitney and 
Miss Marian Dean, a daughter of Royal Cady and Marian (Smith) Dean, of 
Townsend, Huron county, Ohio. They became the parents of four children : Ma- 
rian Daisy, the wife of E. B. Dillon, of Columbus; Ruby L., of this city; Ida C, 
now the wife of Amos W. Gardiner, of Houston, Texas ; and Warren Calvin, who 
is a prominent representative of the A. B. Chase Company. He was born in 
Norwalk, October 9, 1882, was educated in the schools of this city, in Ohio Uni- 
versity and in Princeton University, in which he was graduated with the class of 
1906. He then entered into active relations with the A. B. Chase Company and 
now spends much of his time on the road in looking after the interests of the firm. 
He is a bright young man, fitted by education and training to follow in the foot- 
steps of his father. The wife and mother died November 4, 1901, and on the 
25th of August, 1904, Mr. Whitney was married to Mrs. Urania A. Todd, who 
with the four children survives the husband and father. 

Some time prior to his demise Mr. Whitney underwent a severe operation, 
from which he never fully recovered and after an illness lasting more than a year 
he passed away on the sixth day of June, 1909. His parents were members of the 
Baptist church for fifty years and he was reared in a religious atmosphere and 
became thoroughly in sympathy with woik along moral lines. For many years he 
held membership in the Methodist church and his religion was always of the 
cheery kind, his life and his example being its exponent. It is not likely that the 
amount that he has given for charities and the cause of religion will ever be known 
because of his desire to give of himself and his money without the plaudits of 
men. However, his contributions to all branches of church work were most gen- 
erous and he donated ten thousand dollars to the extension fund of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church for the building of houses of worship in the far west and, 



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336 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

giving this in honor of his wife, it is known as the Marian Whitney fund. No 
tale of sorrow or distress made appeal to him in vain and not only his substan- 
tial assistance but also his words of encouragement brought hope into the lives 
of many who fared forward the better for it. He possessed a marvelous memory 
and superior intellect which were undimmed during his long illness and though he 
retired from the active management of the Norwalk business he kept in touch 
with the piano trade of the country and to within a month of his death continued 
his correspondence with his contemporaries in that field of labor. The community 
at his death felt that a priceless possession had been taken, for he was a dominat- 
ing factor in commercial and manufacturing circles and was equally prominent 
and honored in all of his relations to the public life and its intellectual and moral 
progress. He left the impress of his individuality for good upon the community 
in such a way that will cause his memory to be enshrined in the hearts of those 
who knew him for years to come. 



MADISON M. FAST. 



Madison M. Fast belongs to one of the old and substantial families of Huron 
county, Ohio, and during his busy life has proven himself worthy of his fore- 
bears who were brave, self-reliant men. He was born March 26, 1857, on 
the farm adjoining his present one in Richmond township, and is a son 
of E. W. and Hannah (Roberts) Fast; a grandson of Jacob and Catherine 
(Rex) Fast and Jacob and Lucinda Roberts, and great-grandson of the redoubt- 
able Christian Fast, Revolutionary soldier and Indian fighter. Christian Fast had 
many remarkable adventures among the Indians, being one of five white 
men captured by the savages. They camped on the banks of the Maumee 
river, and shot three of their prisoners, and burned one of them, Colonel 
Crawford at the stake. Fortunately Christian Fast was able to arouse their super- 
stitious fears and so they spared his life, staining his skin to resemble their own 
and putting rings in his nose and ears. They tried to induce him to marry a 
squaw and become one of them, but the valiant white man watched his opportunity 
and after six months' captivity, managed to escape one night, swimming across 
the Maumee river. His captors missed him and tried to stop his escape by 
firing at him, but although the shots fell all about him in the water, he reached 
the opposite bank unhurt and was able to reach a white settlement three miles 
distant, although closely pursued by the Indians. 

E. W. Fast, father of Madison M. Fast, is now living on the homestead south 
of that of Madison M. Fast, who operates it for him, the father having retired 
from active life after many years, spent in farming. While not enrolled as a 
member of the United Brethren church, he has always been much interested in 
its work and a liberal contributor to it, and he donated the land on which stands 
the present church of the denomination in Richmond township. The church 
edifice adjoins his house. lie and his wife became the parents of the following 
children: Jane, who married Jacob Walker; Mary, who married Scott Sewalt ; 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 337 

Madison M., who is mentioned below; Elmer; Leroy, who is deceased; and Ida, 
who married Weadel Skidmore. 

Madison M. Fast was married October 10, 1882, to Susan Resh, a daughter 
of Henry and Catherine (Thomas) Resh, both natives of Pennsylvania, where they 
were married, but later removed to Richland county, Ohio, and later to Huron 
county. Their children were: Henry; Catherine, who married Wesley Sparks; 
Jacob, who went west and was never heard of afterward ; Joseph, who is decease 1 ; 
Samuel; Mary Anne, who married George W. Ritz ; Sarah, who died, married 
Isaac Snavley ; William ; and Mrs. Fast. Mr. and Mrs. Fast had six children : 
Oilie M., who married Joseph Mann; Orin; Leroy; Russell; Effie, who is de- 
ceased, and Daisy. 

Mr. Fast owns ninety-six acres of fine farming land in Richmond township, 
which he has brought to a good state of cultivation, and he operates it in con- 
junction with the farm of his father. He has been road supervisor and school 
director, and in in his political views, he is a democrat and is earnest in the support 
of his party. His family belong to the United Brethren church. The standing 
of Mr. Fast in his community both as a farmer and citizen is high, and he has 
attained it through honorable methods and close attention to his work. 



HUBBARD D. PALMER. 

Hubbard D. Palmer occupies one of the most beautiful country homes of 
Huron county, situated in the midst of two hundred acres of valuable land in 
Fitchville township. He has other desirable property elsewhere and as the result 
of his well directed business affairs in former years, is now numbered among the 
men of affluence in his community. He was born in Fitchville township, this 
county. His father, Seeley Palmer, was one of the earliest settlers of the county 
and aided in building the first frame house in Norwalk. 

Spending his youthful days in the place of his nativity, Hubbard D. Palmer 
pursued his education in the public schools, continuing his studies in the Fitch- 
ville high school of which Colonel De Wolff was then the superintendent. He en- 
tered business life in connection with the construction of the Western Union 
Telegraph lines at the age of sixteen years, gaining practical experience that was 
of the greatest benefit to the government when he became connected with the 
Union army in the Civil war. He was nineteen years of age when he started 
for California by way of the isthmus. They were about ten days in making the 
trip across Panama and it required more than forty days to complete the journey 
to San Francisco. On reaching the Golden state, Mr. Palmer turned his attention 
to mining and located and bought several claims. He followed hydraulic mining 
in the mountains and met with fair success, the largest pure nugget which he 
took out weighing sixteen and a half ounces. He wears a solid plain gold ring 
made from gold which he took out of the mines himself and cherishes it with 
much pride. Altogether, he was quite successful while in California and, well 
pleased with his trip, he returned to Huron county, Ohio, after a sojourn of 
three years in the far west. He spent three weeks in visiting with his parents and 



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338 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

relatives and then went south to visit his brother-in-law, Dennis Doren, who 
was located at the general headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, holding the 
position of general superintendent of construction of heavy and field telegraph 
wires for the army. At that time, General Thomas T. Eckert was the general 
superintendent of the telegraph department and of the quartermaster's office in 
the general war department, and immediately after Mr. Palmer's arrival in the 
south, learning that he had been trained in the business of constructing tele- 
graph lines, General Eckert influenced him to become the assistant of Mr. Doren. 
He consented and remained at such work until the close of the war. When the 
war was over, General Eckert was made president of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, remaining as its chief executive until about two years ago, when 
he was elected president of the board of directors, which position he still holds. 
Mr. Doren became superintendent of construction of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company in the United States and Canada, and was also made 
president of the Cable Construction Company, continuing in that capacity 
until his death. Mr. Palmer's duty while in the army included the laying of lines 
from the corps to the general headquarters. The heavy wires were laid on poles 
and the field wires were strung on light socket poles and could be taken down 
and removed almost instantly. The manner in which they were put up enabled 
one to construct from twenty-five to thirty-five miles per day. They were strung 
from a reel fastened to the back of mules and were taken in by a similar method. 
The corps wires were all connected in a wagon expressly constructed for that 
purpose containing a battery and if necessary the message could then be repeated 
from the wagon, over the heavy wire to Washington. Mr. Palmer was a wit- 
ness of every important battle in the east fought from the time that General 
Burnsides took charge of the Army of the Potomac until the surrender at Ap- 
pomattox Courthouse. Mr. Palmer was always at general headquarters except for 
the time he was out building lines to the general headquarters. A large number 
of their corps were captured and several died at Andersonville prison. 

After the war, Mr. Palmer remained with the Western Union Telegraph 
Company for about two years, repairing its lines which had been destroyed during 
the period of hostilities. He afterward had full charge, under Mr. Doren, of the 
construction of overland cable lines from Bangor, Maine, to St. Johns, New Bruns- 
wick, through Halifax and Nova Scotia to Plastacove, Great Britian, connecting 
there with the cable. Thus he was busily engaged for several years, but at length 
his health failed him and since then he has spent most of his time in Missouri and 
Ohio. For a period he was engaged in the grocery business and was also busy 
in looking after his landed interests. He is the owner of more than three hundred 
acres of rich and productive land. His home place is a farm of two hundred 
acres in Fitchville township, supplied with all modern improvements, including 
a beautiful residence which he erected and which is one of the fine country homes 
of Huron county. He is also a director of the Huron County Bank and his in- 
vestments have at all times been judiciously placed, so that he is deriving there- 
from a substantial income. 

Mr. Palmer has been twice married. In 1865, he wedded Miss Euphronia 
Knapp, who passed away about the year 1878. In November, 1906, he was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Mina Waterhouse, a daughter of 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 339 

[srael L. Waterhousc, who was born in Schoharie county, New York, in 1819. 
His mother bore the maiden name of Miss Hannah Davis and was a daughter of 
Aaron Davis, one of the heroes of Bunker Hill and a cousin of Commodore 
Perry. She had a great-uncle who preached a sermon in a Quaker church in 
Pennsylvania at the remarkable old age of one hundred and four years. She 
lived to the very advanced age of ninety- four years. The Davis family was of 
English lineage. 

Israel L. Waterhouse, the father of Mrs. Palmer, came to Ohio in 1848. He 
w!as a well educated man and in his younger years taught school. Later he took 
up the occupation of farming which he continued to follow until his retirement 
from active business life in the *8os. He then removed to New London, Ohio, 
where he spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of well earned rest, save for 
the active participation which he took in the public life of the community. After 
his removal to New London, he was elected mayor of the town, also served as a 
member of the city council and in other offices, the duties of which he discharged 
with promptness and fidelity. His political allegiance was given to the republi- 
can party. He assisted in building the numerous churches in New London and, 
although not a member of any, was always a strong supporter of and a liberal 
contributor to all. His death occurred October 16, 1897, when he had reached 
the age of seventy-eight years. On the 4th of November, 1849, ^ e had married 
Hannah M. Stowe, who was born in Skaneateles, New York, September 7, 1828. 
They had a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters, all of whom 
are yet living. Among this number is Mrs. Palmer. 

In his political faith, Mr. Palmer is also a republican and has always kept 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day although not a politician in 
the sense of office seeking. His religious belief accords with the teachings of the 
Congregational church. His has been an interesting and eventful life and if 
written in detail this history would contain many thrilling chapters covering 
his California experiences in the early mining days, his duty on the frontier in the 
Civil war and his connection with the construction of telegraph lines in the United 
States. While in later years he has lived more quietly he has manifested the 
same sterling qualities which have always been characteristic of him and which 
have gained him the high position which he occupies in the regard of his fellow- 
men. 



MRS. EMALINE McFARLAND. 

Mrs. Emaline McFarland is numbered among Huron county's residents who 
have long lived in this section of the state, and she has a very wide and favorable 
acquaintance, many who know her entertaining for her warm regard. She was 
born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1836, and is a daughter of Jacob 
and Rebecca (Brubaker) Truxell. They, too, were natives of the Keystone state, 
where they lived until after their marriage and, on removing westward, they took 
up their abode in Ripley township, Huron county, Ohio, and became identified 
with the farming interests of the locality in which they settled. 



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340 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Their daughter, Emaline Truxell, was reared under the parental roof and was 
educated in the public schools and was early trained to the duties of the household 
so that she was well qualified to take charge of a home of her own at the time of 
her marriage. In early womanhood, she gave her hand and heart to Archibald Mc- 
Farland, who was born in Greenfield township, Huron county, Ohio, on the 31st 
of October, 1822, and was a son of Archibald and Anna (Easter) McFarland. 
Following their marriage the ycung couple began their domestic life upon a farm 
in this county and throughout his remaining days Mr. McFarland carried on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits. He was a man of industry and his diligence and deter- 
mination, which \icre among his salient characteristics, brought him a comfortable 
living and enabled him to leave his family in pleasant circumstances. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. McFarland were born two sens and a daughter, but the 
eldest, Frank Easter, who was born in 1858, is now deceased. The others are: 
Julia A., born in 1861 ; and Archibald Kent, born in 1863. At his death Mr. Mc- 
Farland left to his family seventy acres of rich and productive land and through the 
careful management of their property and wise conduct of their business affairs 
they have increased their holdings until the farm now comprises one hundred and 
eight acres of rich land together with a let of two and a half acres at North Fair- 
field, whereon Mrs. McFarland now makes her home. She has passed the seventy- 
third milestone on life's journey and as she has spent the greater part of her time 
in Huron county she has a very wide acquaintance here, while her many good 
traits of heart and mind have endeared her to those with whom she has been 
brought in contact. 



CI AUDE L. LATHAM. 



Claude L. Latham, an energetic, enterprising and progressive agriculturist of 
Ridgefield township, is devcting his time ai:d energies to the cultivation of his 
farm o; sixty-cne acres. He was torn in that township on the 13th of October, 
1881, his parents being Hardica L. and Ida (Fish) Latham. William Latham, 
the paternal grandfather of cur subject, made his way westward at an early day, 
becoming a pioneer settler of Lyme township, Huron county, Ohio. His family 
numbered eight children, those still living being Ortive, Clayton, Bretna and 
Ionia, while the deceased are Zahm, Hardica L., Delilah and Hilda. 

Hardica L. Latham, the father of Claude L., was born in Lyme township, 
this county, in 1849, was educated in the public schools of Monroeville and when 
a youth of eighteen years went west, traveling quite extensively over that sec- 
tion of the country beyond the Mississippi. Finally he arrived in California where 
he remained for two years. He was also at sea for a period, sailing between Cali- 
fornia and South American ports. Returning to Ohio he went upon the farm 
where his son, Claude L , now lives, in Ridgefield township, Huron county, and 
was successfully identified with agriculture throughout the remainder of his active 
business career. He belonged to the Masonic fraternity and was quite prominent 
politically, being recognized as one of the leading local representatives of the de- 
mocracy. He capably served in the position of township trustee for several years 
and was well known and highly esteemed throughout the community. He was a 



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HARDICA L. LATHAM 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 343 

lover of fine horses and owned a number of them. In manner he was genial, 
courteous and sociable, and these qualities made him very popular so that his death 
was greatly deplored by many friends when in 1904 he was called to the home 
beyond. His wife, who was born in Ridgefield township in 1852, was a daugh- 
ter of Major John Fish, who won his title by service in the war of 1812. He was 
born March 6, 1786, in New York, and served all through the second war with 
England. In 1815 he removed to Licking county, Ohio, and ten years later came 
to Huron county, where he made his home until called to his final rest on the 13th 
of September, 1866. Mrs. Latham still survives her husband and is yet a resident 
of this county. Their union was blessed with two children, Claude L. and Goldie 
C. The latter now makes her home with her mother. 

Claude L. Latham attended the district schools in pursuit of an education and 
was also a student in Monroeville for a time. He was trained to farm work, early 
becoming familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agricul- 
turist, and this line of activity has since claimed his attention. He now owns an 
excellent farm of sixty-one acres in Ridgefield township, on which he has placed 
many substantial improvements. It is a well developed tract of land which is nat- 
urally rich and productive and the alluvial soil brings forth bounteous harvests 
in reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. 

On the 3rd of January, 1905, Mr. Latham was united in marriage to Miss Ada 
Lockwccd, a daughter of James C. and Sarah Lockwood, who were early settlers 
of this county. The Lockwood family, originally from England, settled at Nor- 
walk, Connecticut, while this country was still numbered among the colonial 
possessions of Great Britain, and several members of the family participated in 
the Revolutionary war which brought independence to the nation. Mrs. Latham's 
great-grandfather, George Lockwood, built what is known today as the Lockwood 
road, extending from Norwalk to Milan, Ohio. Her grandfather, Stephen Lock- 
wood, was a native of Allen's Corners, Huron county. He was the first white male 
child born in Huron county, his natal year being 1821. He served as a soldier 
of the Civil war, defending the interests of the Union. He became a prominent 
farmer and stock dealer of this part of the state and was engaged in general mer- 
chandising in Milan at the time of the disastrous fire there, which caused him 
losses amounting to thirty-three thousand dollars. His wife, Mrs. Sarah Lock- 
wood, was a native of Norwalk, Connecticut, born in 1827 and came to Huron 
county with her parents. James C. Lockwood, the father of Mrs. Latham, was 
tern in Huron county in September, 1854. Having arrived at years of maturity 
he wedded Miss Sarah Beekley, who was born in Milan, Ohio, in 1853. Her * a ~ 
ther, Anthony Beekley, was a native of Baden, Germany, and came to America 
when sixteen years of age. He devoted his life to carpentering and to school 
teaching and was also a musician of considerable note. For eight years he en- 
gaged in teaching in itie Catholic school at Milan. He, too, was a veteran of the 
Civil war and died in 1906. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Barbara Kel- 
lar, was a native of Switzerland and unto them were born six children. 

L T nto Mr. and Mrs. Claude L. Latham have been born two children, Ida L. 
and Howard L. Fraternally Mr. Latham is identified with the Masonic lodge at 
Norwalk and is a worthy exemplar of the craft. He has always made his home in 
Ridgefield township and, though still a young man, has also attained a creditable 



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344 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

measure of success in the conduct of his farming interests. The name of Lath- 
am has figured prominently in the annals of this county from pioneer times down 
to the present and the subject of this review has ever fully sustained the hon- 
orable reputation borne by his father and grandfather. 



LOUIS W. WICKHAM. 

The name of Wickham is well in Norwalk in connection with the practice 
of law, to which profession Louis W. Wickham gives his attention. He was 
born in this city, November 30, 1866, and is a son of Judge C. P. Wickham, of 
whom extended mention is made on another page of this work. His grandfather 
was Judge Frederick Wickham, a representative of an old New England family 
of Puritan ancestry. The first of the name to come to the west was William 
Wickham, a native of Rhode Island, and the grandfather of Frederick Wick- 
ham. 

In the public schools of this city Louis W. Wickham pursued his early educa- 
tion and afterward attended the preparatory school of the Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, while later he became a student in Princeton University. He then studied 
law with his father and was admitted to the bar in 1889, after which he be^an 
practice in Norwalk. He has served for five years as prosecuting attorney of 
Huron county, being elected in 1903 and again in 1906. He was in partnership 
with his father until September, 1908, since which time he has practiced alone. 

In 1892, Mr. Wickham was married to Miss Ellen E. Benedict, a daughter of 
David D. Benedict, of an old Huron county family. They have four children: 
Susan, Cora, Fred and Annabelle. Mr. Wickham is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, belonging to Mount Vennon Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Huron Chapter, R. 
A. M. ; and Norwalk Commandery, K. T., of which he is at present eminent com- 
mander. 



FRED D. PIERCE. 



Fred D. Pierce, a native of Wakeman township, his birth having occurred 
April 22, 1859, is a representative of a family long and prominently connected 
with the annals of this township. His grandfather, Amile P. Pierce, brought his 
family from South Britain, Connecticut, in 1817, arriving in this locality about the 
same time that C. C. Canfield and Samuel Bristol, accompanied by their families, 
settled here. These three families constituted the first while settlers in Wake- 
man township. The district was then wild, its lands unclaimed and its resources 
undeveloped and Mr. Pierce was obliged to clear the land, then covered by a 
dense forest, in order to build a cabin for the shelter of his family. Men of the 
present period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the 
pioneer settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders 
of civilization, the hardships endured, the difficulties overcome. Mr. Pierce, with 
characteristic energy, participated in the slow, persistent work of development 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 345 

which was necessary to reclaim this land for the purposes of civilization and, per- 
mitting no obstacles to overcome his determination and undaunted courage, event- 
ually gained a gratifying measure of success in his agricultural enterprise, becom- 
ing a prosperous farmer and extensive land owner. He was a man of strong, 
sterling character, his help and counsel being sought by many of the early set- 
tlers. He married Miss Electa Blackman ere his removal west and in their family 
were six children, all ot whom attained maturity, but have now passed away. This 
number included : Minott ; Lemuel ; David S. ; Bennett, who was drowned in the 
Defiance river, leaving a family to mourn his loss ; Fanny, who became the wife 
of Horace J. Beecher of Wakeman and both are now deceased: and Ann, who 
became the wife of Dr. Johnson, of Oberlin. 

Of this family David S. Pierce became the father of our subject. He was 
reared upon the old homestead farm, which he later continued to operate, and 
was also very successful in his business affairs. A fine specimen of American 
manhood, he became actively and helpfully identified with the public affairs of the 
locality, also championing any causes that tended to better the conditions or fur- 
ther the development of the community. He was frequently called to fill various 
township offices and was always faithful and loyal to the trust imposed in him. 
He married Miss Julia A. Bunce and their family consisted of two children : Fred 
D., of this review, and Jennie I., now Mrs. Edward P. Canfield. The father passed 
away October 22, 1870, his remains being interred at Wakeman, while his wife 
is still surviving and in her eighty- fourth year is in good health and vigor. 

Fred D. Pierce, whose name introduces this sketch, was reared upon the old 
homestead, his time being passed in the pursuits common to the country lad. He 
attended the schools of Wakeman in the acquirement of his education and re- 
mained upon the home farm for a number of years, cultivating the fields and 
making a specialty of raising thoroughbred Hereford cattle. In 1895, however, 
he sold the place and removed to Wakeman, where he engaged in the hay and 
grain business and became a very extensive dealer in those products. He is a 
man of keen discrimination and sound judgment and his close application to busi- 
ness and his excellent management have brought to him a gratifying degree of 
prosperity. 

Throughout the years of his residence in Wakeman, Mr. Pierce has taken 
a deep interest in public matters. He is a stalwart republican in politics and served 
several terms as township trustee, while in 1897, he was appointed postmaster of 
Wakeman under President McKinley, and is still incumbent in that office, now 
serving in his third term and performing his duties therein in a way that has 
gained the approbation and approval of his fellowmen. At the time of his ap- 
pointment the postoffice at Wakeman was a fourth-class office, but during his 
terms of service, the business has greatly increased, causing the office to be ad- 
vanced to the third-class, the incumbent becoming a presidential appointee. Four 
rural routes have been established, thus supplying free mail delivery to .every 
point in the township. 

Mr. Pierce was united in marriage on the 18th of October, 1880, to Miss Ida 
E. Barnes, a daughter of George A. and Elizabeth (Sherman) Barnes. Both the 
Barnes and Sherman families are old residents of Wakeman county, engaged 
in agricultural pursuits and prominent in the affairs of the community. Mr. Barnes 



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346 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

passed away in February, 1888, and is still survived by his wife. The home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Pierce has been blessed with two sons, David E. and Idane B. The 
former is in business in Elyria, while the latter is associated with his father in his 
hay and grain enterprise. After nine years of happy wedded life, Mr. Pierce 
was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed away on the 16th of 
April, 1889. Mr. Pierce is public-spirited in his citizenship, advocating all meas- 
ures which tend toward the general welfare of the community, while the matter 
of public improvements is a cause dear to his heart. Honest and loyal in all rela- 
tions of life, he has gained the high regard and esteem of all with whom he has 
come in contact and the consensus of public opinion accords him a high place among 
the representative and prominent citizens of Wakeman. 



SHERMAN O. NOBLE. 



Sherman O. Noble, one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of Ripley 
township, owning and operating an excellent farm of three hundred and ten 
acres, was born October 8, 1867, m tms township, his parents being W. P. and 
Eliza (Starkey) Noble. The former, who was born in Richland county in 1839, 
was a son of Harvey Noble and a brother of William, James, John, Margaret, Min- 
erva and Mary Noble. Throughout his active career, he followed the occupation of 
farming but is now living retired in Greenwich, in the enjoyment of well earned 
rest. In early life, he was a prominent figure in community affairs, serving as 
county commissioner for six years while he likewise filled the office of township 
trustee and also of land appraiser. He married Eliza Starkey, a daughter of 
James Starkey of Virginia and the eldest in a family of seven children born 
unto her parents, the others being Wesley, Reuben, Abraham, Anderson, Jane 
and Levina. Unto W. P. Noble and his wife were born eleven children, three 
of whom died in infancy. Those who survived were : Theodore, Sherman, Mina, 
Elmer C, Allen, Hayes, Winnie and Nellie. 

Sherman O. Noble spent the period of his boyhood and youth upon his father's 
farm and is indebted to the district school system for the educational privileges 
which he enjoyed. When not engaged with his text-books, he assisted his father 
in the work of the fields and early became familiar with the tasks that fall to the 
lot of the country lad. He remained under the parental roof until he attained 
his majority, when, entering business life on his own account, he wisely chose as 
his life work the occupation to which he had been reared. He has since that 
time directed his energies toward agricultural pursuits, being the owner of an 
excellent farm of three hundred and ten acres, situated in Ripley township, which, 
under the care and labor bestowed upon it, has become one of the valuable and 
desirable properties of the township. In addition to his general farming, he de- 
votes much time to stock interests, being an extensive buyer and shipper of 
general stock, while ha makes a fpecialty of breeding heavy draft horses and also 
thoroughbred short-horned cattle. He is a stockholder in the Clinton Air Line' 
Telephone Company, and his various business interests, which are capably con- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 347 

ducted along modern and progressive lines, are proving a source of gratifying 
and substantial income. 

It was in July, 1893, that Mr. Noble was united in marriage to Miss Alice 
Cherry, the youngest daughter of William and Emma (Hester) Cherry, her 
sisters being Lina and Rose. As the years have come and gone the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Noble has been blessed with three children, namely: Paul, who 
was born in 1895; Nona, whose birth occurred in 1897; and Thelma, born in 
1898. At the polls Mr. Noble gives his allegiance to the republican party, which 
organization he has supported since age conferred upon him the right of fran- 
chise. He is now serving his fourth term as township trustee, which office he is 
filling with entire credit to himself. He is public-spirited in his citizenship, lend- 
ing his aid to all measures which have for their object the growth and welfare of 
the community. He is a man of excellent business ability and sound judgment, 
and the success which he today enjoys has come to him as the result of his own 
labor, economy and indomitable energy. 



MATHIAS CLAUS. 



Mathias Claus, a retired farmer of Sherman township, Huron county, and 
the owner of one hundred and thirty-three acres of fine land, was born in Ger- 
many, October 20, 1834, and is the son of Mathias and Mary Claus. The par- 
ents came to this country with their family in 1852, and settled in Sherman town- 
ship, where they bought forty acres of land, on which was a log cabin. In this, 
they made their home for about five years, and then sold that land, buying a lar- 
ger tract in the same township, which was their home until they were called to 
their final rest. The father attained the advanced age of eighty-two, but the 
mother was granted only forty years. By their union, were born five children: 
Helen, the widow of a Mr. Fisher, and a resident of Bellevue, Ohio; Martin, a 
resident of Sherman township ; Mathias ; and George, of Sherman township. 

Mathias Claus was but fifteen years of age when his parents came to this 
county and here he has made his home ever since. He received the greater 
part of his education in the land of his birth, but after locating here attended night 
school for a time to become proficient in the English language. He began to 
learn agricultural pursuits in his early youth and has devoted his life to that 
calling. On his present farm, he has lived for a period of thirty-seven years 
and during this time has greatly improved its condition and increased its value 
beyond what it was when he purchased it from John Strupe. For a short period, 
however, he left the quiet life on the farm for the noise and danger of the bat- 
tlefield, for hi 1864, he enlisted in Company C, Sixty- fourth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry. He joined his regiment at Sandusky, Ohio, and went to Camp Chase, 
from there going to Nashville, Tennessee. He was in a number of battles and 
skirmishes in and about Nashville, and at the battle of Franklin, was severely 
injured by jumping over a breastwork. In 1865, he was mustered out at Nash- 
ville, after which he returned to his home and has engaged in farming ever since 



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348 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

though at present he has resigned the active duties of life and has consigned the 
management of the place to his able sons. 

On the 2d of January, 1867, Mr. Claus married Miss Josephine Shank, a 
daughter of Frank and Helen Shank, of Sherman township. Mrs. Claus was 
born in Germany, February 14, 1846, and came to this country with her father 
at the age of eighteen. They settled in Norwich township, where the father died 
at the age of seventy-five. The mother had passed away many years before in 
Germany, being only forty-two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Shank were the par- 
ents of six children, four of whom are living, the two oldest sons, Frank and Ben- 
jamin, having passed away. Of the others, Elias lives in Norwich township ; Jose- 
phine is the wife of our subject ; Carrie is living in Fremont and Agnes in Tiffin, 
Ohio. 

Mr and Mrs. Claus have been blessed with nine children: Frank, living at 
home; Carrie, the wife of Frank A. Heddle, of Monroeville and the mother of 
four children: Clarence, Loretta, Irene and Walter; Mary, the wife of John 
Rossman, of Monroeville and the mother of two children: Oliva and Lucien; 
Josephine, who is the wife of Ed. G. Bick, of Peru township and has one daughter, 
Beatrice ; William, who married Miss Florence Holliday, lives in Peru township, 
and has three children : Colletta, Donald and Josephine ; Louisa, living at home ; 
Joseph, who lives in Peru township; and two youngest, Emma and Fred, both 
at home. The family are all members of the Catholic church at Bismarck. 

Mr. Claus has taken an active part in local affairs as a strong republican and 
has served as road superintendent as the choice of his party. He has also for 
several terms been a member of the school board, giving his aid to any progres- 
sive movements in the cause of local education. After having put aside the more 
onerous of his life's duties and responsibilities, lie lives in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his former toil and in the good will of those who know him, for he is 
a man who has made and retains many stanch friends. 



WILLIAM T. SILSBY. 



One of the notable places of Greenwich township is the Fairmount Stock Farm, 
not only because of its old rural beauty and completeness but for the public-spirited 
character of its proprietor, William T. Silsby. He was born on the 15th of April, 
1868, in East Cleveland, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, and is the son of Sylvester arid 
Beulah (Brockway) Silsby. The mother was a native of Utica, New York, but 
the father was born in Ackworth, Connecticut, and was a direct descendant of one 
of the pilgrims who came to this country in the historic Mayflower. During their 
childhood Mr. and Mrs. Silsby were brought to Ohio by their respective parents, 
the families locating in East Cleveland, the father becoming the owner and 
operator of stone quarries but later in life turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. He died in August, 1894, honored and respected by all who knew him, and 
his wife passed away in December, 1898. 

William T. Silsby was liberally educated in the public schools of Cleveland and 
was reared among the busy activities of a farm near that growing city. Here he 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 351 

laid the foundation stone of all successful life — the power and spirit of work. Af- 
ter his marriage he located in Dawson, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where for 
one year he was employed as foreman of the works of the W. J. Raney Coal 
& Coke Company but at the end of that time he returned to Cleveland and the 
following six years were devoted to farming and to the dairy business. Selling 
his interests in that city in 1899, he came to Huron county and purchased the old 
Cyrus Mead farm of three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land in Green- 
wich township. This is a well improved place and to its further development and 
cultivation he has since devoted his energies, being successfully engaged in both 
general farming and stock-raising. He makes a specialty of breeding fine draft 
horses and short horned cattle and the products of the Fairmount Stock Farm 
have become widely known for their excellence. One of his sons. Charles W., is 
devoting considerable attention to the raising of rose comb white Leghorn 
chickens. In the midst of the farm stands a fine country home equipped with all 
of the modern appliances, the house and barns being lighted by a private electric 
plant and supplied with water by their own system of waterworks. Here hos- 
pitality is dispensed and friends served unstintedly, the Silsbys being noted for 
much graciousness the countryside over. 

It was on the 31st of March, 1891, that Mr. Silsby was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Stoltzenberg, a daughter of Christian and Fredrika (Yurand) 
Stoltzenberg, of Cleveland. Her father, who was a well known farmer and hotel- 
keeper, and was highly respected, died some years ago, but her mother is still 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Silsby have become the parents of seven children, all sons, 
namely : Ralph H., deceased ; Christopher C. ; Charles W. ; Oliver P. ; Harry Z. ; 
Valentine T. ; and Lincoln W. All have been provided with excellent educational 
privileges, Mr. and Mrs. Silsby taking an active interest in educational affairs and 
realizing the value of good school privileges. Christopher C. is attending the 
Greenwich high school and is an enthusiastic ball player and all around athlete. 

In addition to his other business Mr. Silsby was one of the promoters of the 
Clinton Airline Telephone Company, of which he is now president and which 
makes a specialty of rural service. This company has only been in existence for 
the past four years but already has about five hundred patrons and is connected 
with other rural lines, giving free service to more than one thousand patrons. At 
this rate of rapid growth the Clinton Airline bids fair to become one of the leading 
telephone companies of the state. 

A man who attends successfully to hib own private interests is generally will- 
ing to lend his talents to the prosecution of public interests. With fine public 
spirit Mr. Silsby has always entered actively into the public life 0/ the community 
in which he has happened to reside. The late movement for good roads has found 
in him an especially active friend, and he was sincere and successful in his ad- 
vocacy of the forty thousand dollar bond issue to improve Greenwich township 
roads. Having reared a family of bright children, he naturally has always been a 
great friend of education and the idea of the centralized school has appealed 
strongly to him. But it is useless to further enumerate the public improvements 
which have at different times secured his support, for Mr. Silsby has always been 
in the forefront in the battle for the uplift of society. A democrat in politics, Mr. 



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352 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Silsby is active in the interests of his party. He is a member of the county board 
of elections and while ? party man, he has the name of being fair to the opposition. 
Socially he is a member of O. K. Lodge, No. 616, K. P., and is also identified 
with the Greenwich Lodge, No. 640, I. O. O. F. In the former he is a past chan- 
cellor and is at present a member of the board of trustees of the lodge. He is a 
great worker while he works, but he believes in the maxim "All work and no play 
makes Jack a dull boy." In season therefore he indulges in hunting and fishing 
and is known as one of the best sportsmen in the township. 



LEWIS WOODRUFF. 



Lewis Woodruff is an acti>e factor in business circles in Fairfield township, 
where he owns and occupies a farm of one hundred and thirty acres. His at- 
tention, however, is not all given to the tilling of the soil for he also devotes some 
time to carpentering and is leading a very busy and useful life. He is numbered 
among the native sons of the county, his birth having occurred in Peru township 
on the 7th of Arpil, 1852. His parents were Chancey and Juliet (Sanders) Wood- 
ruff, the former born in Huron county in 1820 and the latter in Peru township 
in 1827. The paternal grandfather of our subject was George Woodruff, while 
the maternal grandparents were John and Maria (Cleary) Sanders. Unto 
the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Chancey Woodruff were born two sons and a 
daughter: Lewis, Stanley and Nellie. 

The youthful days of Lewis Woodruff were quietly passed in the pursuits of 
the home farm. He obtained his education in the public schools and through 
the periods of vacation worked in the fields, assisting his father in their develop- 
ment. He was early trained to habits of industry and economy and learned val- 
uable lessons concerning persistency of purpose and unfaltering diligence. 

On the 19th of January, 1876, Mr. Woodruff was married to Miss Addie 
Felton, who was born in Norwich township, Huron county, February 13, 1855. 
Her father, Ephraim Felton, was a son of James and Eunice (Wheeler) Felton, 
and, having arrived at years of maturity, he wedded Mary Gilson, by whom he 
had three children: Asa, Celia and Melissa. For his second wife he married 
Mary Ann Fitch, who was born in Huron county, Ohio, in 1810 and was a daugh- 
ter ox Berlin and Susanna (Hawks) Fitch. The children of the second union 
were: Addie, Mary, Lillian and Emma. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Wood- 
ruff has been blessed with five children: Marion, who was born in 1877; Stanley, 
in 1878; Anna, in 1880: Myrtle, in 1886; and Harry, in 1889. 

Since attaining his majority Lewis has resided upon a farm and is the owner 
of one hundred and thirty acres of productive land which is well improved and 
returns to him a gratifying income because of the care and labor which he be- 
stows upon the fields. He is now working at the carpenter's trade and in that 
department of business displays skill and ability, possessing much natural me- 
chanical ability and ingenuity. In community affairs, he is interested, co-operating 
in many measures for the general good. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party and for six years, he served as a trustee of Fairfield township. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 353 

Fraternally he is connected with the Maccabees and the Grange. Having spent 
his entire life in this locality, he has a wide acquaintance and his record as a 
business man and citizen entitles him to the friendly regard in which he is uni- 
formly held. 



ALBION D. MAYNARD. 

Albion D. Maynard, who for a number of years combined the occupation of 
tanning with his trade as a blacksmith, is now conducting a blacksmith and re- 
pair shop in Boughtonville. He was born in Ripley township, January 12, 1848, 
and is a son of Deranzil and Annis (Ingersoll) Maynard. The father was born 
in the state of New York in 1812 and was a son of David and Nancy Maynard, 
who were the parents of nine children: David, John, Deranzil, George, Ira, Mary, 
Laura, Lucy and Thomas. The mother was born January 19, 1816, and was a 
daughter of Ralph Ingersoll and his wife. To them were born seven children: 
Luther, Lewis, Darius, Harriet, Amanda, Annis and Polly. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Deranzil Maynard have been born six children: Nancy F., David A., Albion D., 
Robert A., Lucy L. and Mortimer I. The father followed the life of a farmer and 
was active in the public affairs of his township, not shunning the duties of office 
when the people wished so to honor him. He has been a stanch republican since 
that party was organized to supplant the old line whigs, and to support the nation 
in its hour of need. 

The son of a farmer, it was but natural that Albion D. Maynard should fol- 
low the same kind of Work. In his youth, however, he learned the trade of a 
blacksmith and finding it profitable has from time to time engaged exclusively 
in practicing it. For twenty years, he lived in Michigan, farming and working 
at his trade. Ohio proved to be the state with the stronger attractions and Mr. 
Maynard returned to his home where he has remained since. His reputation as 
a skilled workman having been made, the Rinehart & Dennis Construction Com- 
pany engaged him several years ago to act as foreman over those engaged in 
their carpenter and trestle work. He was employed by that firm for four years 
but since the expiration of that time he has not sought other positions as he finds 
he has all he can do with the work that is brought into his shop. 

Mr. Maynard was still in the first years of his young manhood when, on the 
28th of August, 1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Downey. She 
was born in Lorain county, Ohio February 4, 1852, and is a daughter of D?.vid 
L. and Ann (Wilkinson) Downey, the former a native of New York, the latter 
a Canadian. They were the parents of Orilla, Elizabeth, Priscilh, Elizabeth, 
Doris, Catherine, Sarah, Flora and Lorenzo. Mr. and Mrs. Maynard's union 
has been blessed with three children, all of whom have married and established 
homes of their own. Clifford, born September 23, 1873, married Miss Bertie 
Cleverly and they have one child, Donald. Iva, born in 1875, married Frank 
Gleason. Annis, born September 20, 1878, married Cortland Miller, who is a 
minister and is located at Walton, Indiana. 

The family were reared in the Christian church and still live up to its teach- 
ings in so far as they are able. Though not a politician nor active in public affairs, 



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354 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Mr. Maynard never misses an opportunity to cast his vote for the republican 
candidates, feeling that it is the duty of every citizen to exercise his right to 
ballot and believing that that party makes for the stability and progress of the 
nation's government. A hard working man and conscientious, he has made firm 
friends among his fellow members of the Tribe of Ben Hur. 



DOWNING H. YOUNG, M. D. 

Dr. Downing H. Young, whose ability is manifest in the large practice which 
is accorded him in Wakeman and throughout the surrounding country, was born 
October 7, 1842, in Mansfield, Ohio, his parents being Downing H. and Ange- 
line (Marvin) Young. The grandfather Lemuel Young was a Virginian and 
came to Ohio at a very early date, settling in Holmes county, near Millersburg. 
He devoted his entires life to the occupation of farming. His son Downing H. 
Young was born in Virginia, August 6, 1816, and left home when sixteen years 
of age. He then went to Shelby, Ohio, where he remained for two years, after 
which he went to Peru, Ohio, and learned the trade of blacksmithing. He fol- 
lowed that for only a brief period, however. Subsequent to his marriage, which 
occurred on the 6th of September, 1836, he engaged in merchandising and while 
devoting his attention to the conduct of his store he also took up the study of law 
and was admitted to the bar. He practiced both in Shelby and Mansfield, becom- 
ing a resident of the latter city and as the years passed he attained eminence in 
his profession. He was very active in the days of the Civil war, doing much to- 
ward raising troops and giving four sons to the service. Throughout his entire 
life his citizenship was of a most loyal and progressive character, his cooperation 
being always counted upon to further any movement for the public good. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Angeline Marvin, was the eldest of fourteen 
children and the first white child born in Sharon township, Richland county, Ohio, 
on the site of what is now the city of Shelby. Her parents were Stephen and 
Sarah (Moyer) Marvin, Connecticut people, who came to Ohio about 1814. Her 
maternal grandmother in her maidenhood bore the family naime of Burr and was 
a close relative of Aaron Burr. Her family had from the government some of the 
"Fireland Land Script'* for property destroyed by the British. This brought the 
Moyer family to Ohio and they located land on Blackfork at Shelby, developing 
there a homestead property which is still in possession of their descendants. 

Downing H. and Angeline (Marvin) Young had a family of eleven children: 
Hercelia J. ; Mary A. ; Elmira A. ; Samuel Hinkley ; Henry St. John ; Andrew 
Jackson ; Downing Howard ; Stephen Marvin ; Daniel Sherwood ; Sarah Ange- 
line ; and Grace. Of these Hercelia J., Elmira, Downing, Stephen and Sarah are 
still living. One son, Samuel H. Young, was a member of Company C, First 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Captain John McLaughlin, en- 
listing in response to the first call for three months' troops. He participated in 
the first battle of Bull Run and on the expiration of his term of enlistment he 
rejoined the army as a member of Company C, Sixty-fifth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, which was attached to Sherman's brigade. He participated in a number 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 355 

of contests with the enemy and was injured at the battle of Pittsburg Landing. 
He bore a lieutenant's commission, but his injury necessitated his resignation from 
the service. Later when he had sufficiently recovered he joined Company H, 
of the One Hundred and Twenty-eight Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was as- 
signed to garrison duty on Johnsons Island. He was also a lieutenant in this 
organization and at the close of the war received a lieutenants commission in 
the regular army. He was relieved from duty in 1866 and, returning home, took 
up newspaper work as editor and publisher of the Shelby Chronicle, continuing 
in active connection with that paper until his death in 1869. Another son, Henry 
St. John, was a member of Company C, Sixty-fifth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. He was a sergeant and was killed at the battle of Stone River. A 
third son, Andrew Jackson, was a member of Company C, Sixty-fifth Regiment of 
Ohio Infantry and died in Danville, Kentucky, from pneumonia contracted while 
on the line of duty. Downing H. Young, of this review, was also a soldier, en- 
listing in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-eight Ohio Volunteer Infan- 
try, with which he served until the close of the war, doing post duty at Johnsons 
Island. A son-in-law, Jerome B. Howard, who was the husband of Elmira Young, 
was a member of the One Hundred and Twenty-third Ohio Regiment and while 
on his way from Columbus, where he had been on detailed duty, to join his com- 
mand, he was captured and sent to Andersonville prison, where he died. He 
was a man of fine education and high attainments. After her husband's death his 
widow studied medicine, winning her degree in the Womans' College in New 
York in 1868. She then located in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she practiced for 
many years and was eminently successful. She chaperoned a company of young 
ladies from Cincinnati to the Vienna exposition and during that time took a 
post-graduate course at the Vienna Hospital. She has now retired from active 
practice, however, and resides with her son Hiram M., who is an electrical ex- 
pert, at Palmyra, Illinois. Another son, Jerome B., an editor of the Phonographic 
Magazine of Cincinnati, is also proprietor of the Pitman shorthand system and 
likewise a musician of much renown. The military record of this family is cer- 
tainly a remarkably one and their history in other directions is that of successful 
achievement. 

With his family Downing H. Young, Sr., removed to Toledo, Ohio, in 1857, 
and there engaged in the practice of law until June, i860, when he established 
his home at New Haven, Huron county, where he resided until his death and 
where the family home it yet maintained. For many years, they have been valued 
and respected citizens of that district. 

Downing H. Young, whose name introduces this review, was educated in the 
schools of Mansfield, Toledo and New Haven, Ohio. His time was largely spent 
in school up to the outbreak of the Civil war and following the close of hostili- 
ties he entered the medical department of the University of Wooster at Cleve- 
land in 1865* He was graduated in May, 1871, and in the intervening years has 
since given his time, energies and attention to his profession and duties. 

On the 31st of December, 1868, Dr. Young was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Merrihew, a daughter of Jesse and Charlotte (Lyon) Merrihew, of Knox county, 
Ohio. They became the parents of two children: Andy Jason and Charlotte M., 
both of whom still survive, but the mother died in April, 1898. The son is mar- 



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356 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ried and resides in Winfield, Kansas, while the daughter is now the wife of Wal- 
lace Wyandt, of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Dr. Young was married a second 
time December 5, 1900, the lady of his choice being Mrs. Anna Bunelle, of Wake- 
man. 

Dr. Young began the practice of his profession in Steuben, Huron county, 
where he remained for three years and then went to Delaware county, Ohio, where 
he spent three and one-half years. He was afterward located at Chicago Junc- 
tion until 1901, when he came to Wakeman, where he has since practiced. He 
has always been a close student of everything bearing upon his chosen line of 
work and reading and investigation have ke.pt him in close touch with the ad- 
vance of the profession. For four years, he was the coroner of Huron county and 
was emergency surgeon for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad from 1887 until 
1901. At the present writing, he is the president of the Huron county board of 
pension examiners, of which he has been a member for twelve years. He has 
also been a member of the Chicago Junction school board for a number of years 
and health officer for four years. Always active in public affairs, he believes 
money invested in public improvements is for the general good and does much 
for the betterment and uplift of the people. Citizenship is to him no mere idle 
term. He feels that every true American citizen should keep well informed 
on the political questions and issues of the day and support the principles which 
he deems most beneficial to the nation at large. He believes also that an intelli- 
gent discussion of public issues cannot result but in public benefits and he is ever 
ready to give a clear and comprehensive exposition of his views and the reasons 
therefor. The republican party finds in him a stalwart champion because of his 
firm belief in its platform. 

Fraternally he is connected with Wilson Todd Post, No. 359, G. A. R., and in 
specifically profession rl lines he is associated with the Huron County Medical 
Association and also with the Ohio State Medical Association. The Young home 
is one of the most attractive in the village. Mrs. Young is a refined and cultured 
lady and both Dr. and Mrs. Young are prominent in the social and intellectual life 
of the community. Their library is well supplied with current literature and the 
works of the best authors, while the Doctor's volumes treating of professional 
subjects, are very numerous, giving him light upon the intricate and involved 
questions that continually arise in daily practice. 



JOSIAH LAWREXCE. 



Prominent amcng the pioneers and substantial citizens of Bronson town- 
ship and Huron county, we present the name of Josiah Lawrence, whose pa- 
rents, Timothy and Calista (Todd) Lawrence, came to Huron county in early 
pioneer times and entered the tract of land which is now the home of the subject 
of this review. Timothy Lawrence was born in Stanford, Connecticut, in 1800, 
and in 1832 made a permanent location in Huron county. He was a carpenter and 
joiner by trade, and, coming here as he did when the work of development, im- 
provement and building was at its height, he found ample opportunity to put 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 359 

into practice his knowledge of the builder's art. This proved of great advantage 
to him, as he was thus able to earn a good living ere he could realize a profit from 
his farming operations. For several years he also did auctioneering, being en- 
gaged in the sale of farm property. In early times he was a whig, later an aboli- 
tionist and eventually gave his support to the republican platform. He was a 
man of much influence in his community, ever ready to assist in any movement 
or measure calculated to benefit his locality or prove of help to his fellowmen. 
He was an expert with the sword and in 1830 commanded a company of light 
artillery at Auburn, New York. His children were : Josiah, of this review ; and 
Delia. Mr. Lawrence departed this life January 30, 1882, when he had reached 
the advanced age of eighty-two years, and thus the community lost one of its 
most highly respected pioneer men. His wife survived for a number of years, 
her death occurring in February, 1899, when she, too, had reached a very ad- 
vanced age, being eighty-six years old. 

Josiah Lawrence received his education through the medium of the common 
schools and was reared to the duties of the home farm, assisting his father from 
the time of early spring planting until crops were harvested in the late autumn. 
He has always lived on the farm which is still his home, it being the 
place of his birth. The tract consists of one hundred and thirty acres, located in 
Bronson township. It is improved with substantial buildings and everything 
about the place is kept in good repair. The only interruption to his farm work 
was at the time of the Civil war, when Mr. Lawrence served cne hundred and 
thirty days as a member of Company B, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Regiment, 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under command of Colonel Blake of Medina county and 
Captain Martin. The company was engaged during this time principally in guard 
duty. After returning from the war Mr. Lawrence resumed his farm labors and 
r s time passed and his financial resources permitted he increased his holdings un- 
til he now owns altcgether three hundred and ten acres of as good land as can be 
found in Huron county. He has always been a noted wood chopper and yet chops 
several cords of wood each winter. 

In October, 1867, Mr. Lawrence was united in marriage to Miss Alice New- 
men, and the children born to them were : Even, who was born in 1868 and married 
Charlotte Hinely ; and Mary, who was born in December, 1869, and is now en- 
gaged in teaching in the Benedict school of Norwalk. The mother of these chil- 
dren died in June, 1870, and in March, 1871, Mr. Lawrence was again married, his 
second union being with Miss Maggie Baird, by whom he had one child, Levinia, 
now the wife of Daniel Stone. Her mother passed away in June, 1878, and in De- 
cember, 1879, Mr. Lawrence married Miss Nancy Rowland, who died on the 12th 
of May, 1909. 

Mr. Lawrence has always given his political support to the republican party 
and for the past twelve years has served as township trustee. He is also a member 
of the board of health and was real-estate assessor in the year 1900. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church and he belongs to 
the Grand Army post. Fond of travel, he has visited twenty different states of the 
Union and contemplates a visit to California in the winter of 1910-11. Having 
spent his entire life in Huron county, in the years which have passed, Mr. Lawrence 
has seen wonderful changes as the county has taken on the evidences of an ad- 



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360 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

vanced civilization, and he has not only been a witness of this transformation but 
has largely aided in the labors which have transformed the wild tract into a splen- 
did agricultural district, while thriving and enterprising cities and villages have 
grown from mere hamlets. Now at the age of seventy-five years he is surrounded 
by all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life and can look back over his long 
and honorable business career without regret. He has ever lived at peace with his 
fellowmen and all who know him esteem him for his genuine personal worth. 



SEBASTIAN PURCELL. 

That the farms of Ohio are valuable investments, furnishing a substantial 
means of subsistence to those who have thereon settled, has been proven again and 
again in the fact that Ohio's native sons remain within her borders. To this 
class belongs Sebastian Purcel^ who was born December 17, 1847, on the farm 
where he has spent his life and which is his present place of residence. 

His parents, John and Margaret Purcell, were both born in Germany and 
on coming to America in 1846, settled in Huron county, Ohio, having purchased 
the farm, then containing one hundred and seventeen acres, which has since been 
in possession of the family. It is situated in Peru township, and to the original 
purchase has been added some twenty-three acres. In the family of John and Mar- 
garet Purcell, there were four children : John, now deceased ; Kathryn, who mar- 
ried Peter Wallrath and resides «t Logansport, Indiana ; Anna, who married Mat 
Grimmer and resides in Peru township ; and Sebastian, the subject of this review 
The father of this family passed away in 1861, when only forty-two years of age, 
while the mother, long surviving, died in 1881, when seventy-three years old. 
John Purcell was greatly interested in the work of general improvement in his 
own county and in addition to his farming operations, built a number of bridges 
and for some time held the position of road supervisor of Peru township, giving 
his time and service in the building of good roads in this locality. 

Sebastian Purcell was reared under the parental roof, assisting his father in 
the fields during the summer seasons, each fall looking forward to an abundant 
harvest as the reward of the summer's toil. In the winter months, he sought 
an education in the district and Catholic schools and in this way spent the day 
of his youth. In early manhood took upon himself the responsibilities of the agri- 
culturist, following this occupation as a life work. Carefully saving his earnings 
each year, at length he was enabled to make the old homestead his own, having 
purchased the farm from his father and, taking great interest in the place, from 
time to time he has added needed improvements and in the fall of 1909, he ex- 
pects to erect a modern residence on his property. 

On the 17th of February, 1872, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Purcell 
and Miss Margaret Brown, who was born in Sherman township in 1850, her 
parents being Fred and Margaret (Pirring) Brown. Unto this union have been 
born seven children, namely : Albert and Edward, who are yet at home with their 
parents ; Tracy, who married Martin Habenmeier and is living at Norwalk ; 
Theodore, of Chicago Junction. Ohio, who married Anna Bishop and has one 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 361 

child, Anna ; Olive, living at home ; Tiliie, of Norwalk, Ohio, who married Mat 
Zurcher and had two children, Edward and Robert, who died when five months 
old, August 8, 1909, and Alfonse, who is living at home. 

Mr. Puroell has followed general agricultural pursuits all his life and is now 
ably assisted in this field of activity by his sons, Albert, Edward and Alfonse. 
In religious faith, he is a Catholic and he gives his political allegiance to the 
democratic party, firmly believing in the principles of its platform as conducive 
to the best forms of government. His son Alfonse is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus of Norwalk, but Mr. Purceil devotes his time and energies exclu- 
sively to his business, and success has been the reward of his labors. 



DWIGHT M. BARRE. 



Industry, energy and thrift have characterized the labors of D wight M. Bar re, 
who is today the owner of eighty acres of well improved and valuable land sit- 
uated in Ripley township, Huron county, in which township he was born on the 
20th of July, 1848. His parents were John and Amy (Stout) Barre, natives of 
Pennsylvania and New York respectively, the former born in 1805, while the lat- 
ter's birth occurred in 1809. J onn Barre was the son of John Barre, Sr., whose 
family consisted of the following children: Dwight, David, Herman, Jonathan, 
Wellington, Henry, Ora, Lyman, James, Corvis, Cornelia, Jane, Marietta, Jose- 
phine and Jessie. The maternal grandparents of our subject were Jonathan and 
Lydia (Mitchell) Stout, whose family of six children included: Amy, Jonathan, 
David, Eliza, Emily and Hannah. 

Dwight M. Barre was reared on the old home farm, his youthful days being 
passed in a manner similar to that of most farm boys who assisted in the work 
of the fields and at the same time had the opportunity of acquiring a fair English 
education in the district schools. After laying aside his text-books, he continued 
to devote his attention to agricultural interests and has made this occupation his 
life work. His well kept farm of eighty acres is one of the valuable farming 
proper-ties of the township and in its neat and attractive appearance indicates the 
thrift and industry of its owner. Close application, systematic methods and in- 
telligently directed energy have been the salient characteristics in the success 
which he now enjoys and he occupies a foremost place among the progressive 
and influential agriculturists of the community. He is also known in the financial 
circles of Greenwich as a stockholder in the First National Bank of that city. 

Mr. Barre laid the foundations for a happy home life in his marriage on the 
22d of December, 1876, to Miss Ella Wolcott, a native of Massachusetts, her birth 
occurring in that state in 1855. Mrs. Barre is a daughter of Renseller and 
Augusta (Miller) Wolcott, both natives of the old Bay state, the former's birth 
occurring in 1830 while the latter was born in 1837. She was a sister of George 
and Esther Wolcott and her grandparents on the paternal side were Thomas and 
Sally (Williams) Wolcott. Her mother was the daughter of Jeremiah and Eliza- 
beth (Olds) Miller, in whose family were the following: Augusta, Alfred, George, 
Frank, Emma, Susan and Hattie. On the paternal side, Mrs. Barre comes from 



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362 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

a family which was founded in America in 1620, representatives of the name hav- 
ing been active in the affairs of this country in early colonial days. Several mem- 
bers of the Wolcott family were governors of Connecticut, one was secretary of 
the treasury under Washington's administration while still another was numbered 
among the signers of the Declaration of Independence. To the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Barre have been born two children, Walter and DeWitt. 

The family are members of the Congregational church, in which Mr. Barre 
is serving as treasurer, and he and his wife occupy a high place socially in the 
community in which they reside. Fraternally, Mr. Barre is a Mason, while in 
politics he gives stalwart support to the republican party, being in hearty sym- 
pathy with its principles and purposes. Having passed his entire life in this 
township, his life record is well known to his fellow citizens, whose respect, con- 
fidence and gcod will he enjoys in no limited degree. 



FRANK O. BRIGGS. 



A representative of the worthier agricultural class of Huron county, Frank 
O. Briggs cultivates a fine farm of one hundred and sixty-five acres in Green- 
wich township. He was born December 7, 1857, on this property, though his has 
not been a continuous residence there and he is a son of George W. and Joanna 
(Kniffin) Briggs and grandson of David Briggs. The grandfather was one of 
the very early pioneers of the county, a justice of the peace for many years, and a 
great hunter and trapper, following this business all over northern Ohio and 
Michigan. He dealt largely with the Indians and secured their friendship by 
his kind and honorable dealing. George W. Briggs was the first white child born 
in Greenwich township. He accompanied his father on his long hunting trips and 
experienced the fidelity and medical skill of the Indians. On one of the trips, 
the boy tcok a severe case of the measles and the father, not knowing what to do, 
finally tcok him to an Indian camp where he left him. When he returned the boy 
had completely recovered. David Briggs finally settled down in Huron county, 
where he died in 1864. George W. married, as stated, and lived for a time in 
Huron, but the inherited spirit of adventure caused him to listen to the siren of the 
gold fields in the great west, and in 1864 he crossed the plains to Idaho City, the 
many thrilling experiences being to him like the smoke of battle to the war horse. 
Mr. Briggs remained in the west until 1876, his wife and children staying in 
Huron county. The whole family then spent three years in Idaho, at the end of 
which time the mother returned. In 1882, Frank and his father also came back, 
giving up frontier life permanently and settling on a farm in Greenwich township. 
George W. Briggs died here in 1901, aged eighty-one years, the wife having pre- 
ceded him the year before at the age of eighty. The daughter, Jennie, is now Mrs. 
T. A. Jenney, residing in California. 

Frank O. Briggs, of this review, was reared in Greenwich township and re- 
ceived a good district school education before going west. Just before returning, 
he married Miss Eliza Stierman, of Idaho City, June 22, 1882, a daughter of 
William and Anna (Otten) Stierman. Mr. Stierman was one of the California 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 363 

"49ers," and there his children were born. Two children form Mr. Briggs* family : 
William and Gladys, both still at home. 

The later life of Mr. Briggs is briefly told. He engaged in farming for a 
few years, after his return from the west, then handled agricultural implements 
at Greenwich village in company with W. J. Richards, under the firm name of 
Richards & Briggs. Again the call of the west was heeded, and in 1886, the 
family went back to Idaho, engaging in the dairy business at Rocky Bar. After 
five years there, they returned to their Greenwich farm, where they have since 
held continuous residence. However, the spirit of the grandsire is strong, and 
in 1906 Mr. Briggs returned to Idaho, taking his family, where they spent some 
eighteen months in hunting and tramping, his son showing his prowess by killing 
three of the five bears secured, together with numerous other large game. 

Frank O. Briggs is alert and active in the life of his home community, serving 
the public at times in the different offices of township trustee, assessor and member 
of the school board. As the present trustee of the township, he is pushing the 
good roads idea and with much success. He is an active standpatter in republican 
politics and as a delegate in the conventions of his party is forceful and judicious 
in outlining party policies. 



CALVIN A. HEYMAN. 



Calvin A. Heyman, a prosperous young farmer of Sherman township, and 
the owner of one hundred and ninety-two acres of fine land, in two different farms, 
was born at Weavers Corners, this township, January 11, 1871, and is a son of 
Jacob and Clara (Longscheid) Heyman. Both parents were born in Germany, 
but came to this country at an early age with their respective parents. Jacob 
Heyman, who is still living on two hundred and fifty acres of land at Weavers 
Corners, was bom December 26, 1836, and was sixteen years of age when his 
parents William C. and Margaret (Upperman) Heyman came to this country. 
The latter settled at Hunts Corners, where they lived for about one year, moving 
then to Sherman township, where they purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land. This was only partly cleared and the house on it was an old frame 
building. Here they lived until 1862, when they bought land in this locality of Mr. 
Weaver, which was their home until death called them, the grandfather at the 
age of eighty-six, the grandmother at seventy-six. They had ten children : Will- 
iam, deceased ; John, killed by a barn door falling on him during a storm ; Charles, 
who lives in Huron, Ohio ; Jacob, the father of the subject of this sketch ; Jean- 
ette, who married Philip Stutz, of Three Rivers, Michigan; Philip, deceased; 
George, of Sherman township; Henry, of Paulding county, Ohio; Fred, of the 
same place; and Elizabeth, the wife of William Horn, of Topeka, Kansas. 

Jacob Heyman, the father of Calvin A., has lived in this county since he was 
sixteen years old. He had attended school in Germany, but after coming here 
was in the employ of various farmers by the year. On the 20th of October, 1861, 
he was married to Miss Catherine Longscheid, who had come to this county with 
her parents when fourteen years of age. Her family settled in Sherman town- 



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364 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

ship, where the parents both died. They had six children: Elizabeth, deceased; 
Margaret; William, deceased; Anthony; Clara, the mother of our subject, and 
one who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Heyman had a family of thirteen 
children, nine of whom died before they were seven years old. Those living are : 
Calvin A., of this review ; Clara, the wife of George Setchel, and the mother of 
one son, Russell; Edward, who was killed in a street car accident at the age of 
thirty- four; and Amelia, who lives at home. Jacob Heyman is a man who has 
been prominent in local affairs. He has been a farmer all his life and has filled 
several offices within the gift of the people, having served as township trustee, jus- 
tice of the peace, real estate assessor, treasurer, road supervisor and school direc- 
tor. He has always voted the democratic ticket and these offices have been be- 
stowed by the voters of that party. He has been a member of the Reformed 
church at Hunts Corners and has held office in the congregation the greater part 
of his life, being the only member now living who helped organize and establish 
the church in 1865. In short, he is a man, who, possessed of strong qualities, 
has riot hesitated to exert them for the good of the community and the fair name 
of himself. 

Calvin A. Heyman. his son, received his early education in the district schools, 
after which he attended the Ohio Normal College at Ada. Upon finishing his 
schooling, he entered upon a period of teaching of perhaps seven years, but he 
has followed farming the greater part of his life, having been reared under the 
guidance of a successful farmer and in a farming community, and when he 
thought of making a home for himself, it was this vocation that he chose. In 
1895 h e bought his present place from Jacob Hass and immediately set about 
improving it and increasing its productiveness. Among the other buildings which 
he has erected is a fine, large barn. 

On the 1 8th of November, 1897, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Heyman 
and Miss Flora Heyman, a daughter of John Paul and Jeanette (Scheid) Heyman, 
who were among the early settlers of Lyme township. She is the sister of L. 
P. Heyman, of whom mention is made in another part of this volume. One 
child, a daughter, Ethel, has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Heyman. 

Mr. Heyman and his family are members of the Reformed church of Hunts 
Corners, in which he has been superintendent of the Sunday school for about 
eleven years. He is a young man of industry and ability, whose efforts have 
so far been crowned with well deserved success and for whom the future seems 
to hold much in store. 



FRANK E. WEEKS, M. D. 

Among the notable citizens of Clarksfield township, who have not onty 
achieved distinction in the particular work which they mapped out for them- 
selves but have entered other fields and have devoted themselves to promoting 
the interests of the community in which they live, is Dr. Frank E. Weeks, a 
physician. He was born in a log cabin in Henrietta township, Lorain county, 



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DR. F. E. WEEKS 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 367 

Ohio, and is the son of Henry H. and Cora L. (Van Camp) Weeks. He is of 
remotely Dutch descent, for one of his ancestors, Jacobus Kipp, was born in 
Holland in 1632, and on the 8th of March, 1654, married Miss Maria de ta 
Montaine, in the old Dutch fort in New Netherlands that is now New York. 
His wife was born near the Maderia islands, January 26, 1637, while her parents 
were on their way to the new country. Sarah Kipp, daughter of Benjamin 
and Dorothy (Davenport) Kipp, the latter a grandson of Jacobus Kipp, was 
married to James Weeks in Newcastle, Westchester county, New York, in 1766. 
The son of this union, Benjamin Kipp Weeks, was born March' 22, 1773, and mar- 
ried Sarah Thorn, the daughter of Thomas, Jr., and Hannah (Sutton) Thorn. 
Thomas T. Weeks, a son of Benjamin, came with his family to Ohio in 1837 
and settled in Florence township, Erie county, where he engaged in farming. 
The first piece of land he purchased was heavily covered with timber, and later 
he bought another tract on which the work of clearing had already been begun 
and which boasted a double log house. In this the family lived for eight years, 
while their frame house was building. He had followed the life of a farmer, 
and his son Henry H. took up the same line of work in Florence township, Erie 
county. In 1883, Henry H. Weeks removed to Kipton, Lorain county, where he 
has since resided, living in retirement upon his farm. One son only was born 
to him and his wife, Dr. Frank E. Weeks. 

In the district schools of the county Frank E. Weeks received the fundamentals 
of a broad education. On leaving these he spent three terms in study at Oberlin 
University, after which he taught for three winters, working on the farm dur- 
ing the summer months. In 1880 he took up the study of medicine, entering the 
medical department of the Western Reserve University at Cleveland, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1883. Dr. Edwin E. Beeman, who was at 
that time practicing in Wakeman, was his preceptor. After receiving his physi- 
cian's license, Dr. Weeks began the practice of his profession in Kipton, Lorain 
county. In 1885 he removed to Vermilion, Erie county, and the next year came 
to Clarksfield, where he has remained ever since and enjoys a large and remuner- 
ative practice. An able physician, Dr. Weeks is also an exemplary citizen, 
whose public spirit is an inspiration to many. In politics he is a republican and 
has ever been active in the affairs of the party, having been for years the Clarks- 
field member of. the republican county committee, and almost invariably the 
township delegate to the county, district and state conventions. During one 
term he served the county as coroner, was township clerk for eighteen years and 
clerk of the school board for twenty years, and is at present a member of the lat- 
ter body. His literary and historical interests are also extensive, biography and 
genealogies receiving much of his attention. The Firelands Historical Society 
appointed him biographer for Huron county, a position he holds to the present. 
In 1908 he compiled The Pioneer History of Clarksfield, a very complete work, 
comprising both historical and biographical data, and is now engaged on similar 
work, which he hopes to publish soon. Perhaps, however, the measure of his 
public spirit can be estimated in no better way than by the fact that it was through 
his efforts that the Clarksfield Telephone Company was organized and incor- 
porated, a concern which has now one hundred and fifty subscribers with long 
distance connection. 



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368 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

On the 5th of June, 1883, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Weeks to Miss 
Cynthia A. Judson, the daughter of Albert W. and Mary Ann (Fish) Judson, 
of Berlin Heights, Erie county, where for a number of years Mr. Judson was 
civil engineer and surveyor. He died April 22, 1904, but his wife, who survives, 
lives in Sandusky, Ohio. Dr. and Mrs. Weeks are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Charles J., who is married and is a resident of Oberlin, Ohio; Lucy M., a 
teacher in the Clarksfield schools, who entered Oberlin College in the fall of 
1909 ; and Paul T., also a student at Oberlin. 

In all that he has undertaken Dr. Weeks has achieved success and a fair fame, 
and the results of his labors have been far-reaching. As a physician he enjoys 
an extensive practice and the confidence of those to whose wants he administers. 
In the councils of the republican party his opinion is ever regarded highly. In 
Clarksfield the interest he has evinced in public matters, especially in educa- 
tional affairs, has met with unswerving good will and loyalty. His literary efforts, 
too, have been successful, for he is a graceful and fluent writer, endowed with 
the power of expressing what he has to say in an interesting and attractive 
manner. Before the meetings of the Huron County Medical Society he often 
reads papers on important subjects, for he stands high in this organization, 
and his opinions on matters in dispute is eagerly sought. In short he is a man 
who has improved upon the many opportunities afforded him, has used them for 
his own advancement and the welfare of his fellows. 



.C. A. PAUL. 



C. A. Paul needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for he is a lead- 
ing and representative business man the story of whose life is that of orderly pro- 
gression under the steady hand of one who is a consistent master of himself and 
who possesses a well balanced organism. Capable of mature judgment of his own 
capacities and of the people and circumstances that make up his life's contacts and 
experiences he is eminently a man of business sense and easily avoids the mistakes 
and disasters that come to those who are liable to erratic movements resulting in 
unwarranted risk and failure. He has been identified with manufacturing in- 
terests, but for a long period his investments have been represented by banking 
and agricultural interests and he is now vice-president of the Citizens Banking 
Company of Norwalk. 

A native of Erie county, Ohio, C. A. Paul was born December 12, i860, and 
represents a pioneer family of that county. His grandfather, Loren Paul, set- 
tled in Erie county at a very early day, having driven westward to Ohio from the 
state of New York with a yoke of oxen. In the midst of the wild forest he es- 
tablished his home, securing a large tract of land which he converted into rich and 
productive fields as the years passed by. His son, James L. Paul, was also a na- 
tive of Erie county and having arrived at year§ of maturity he married Miss Eliza 
A. Delamater, a native of New York. He also devoted his entire life to general 
agricultural pursuits, being still identified with farming interests. His wife 
passed away on the nth of April, 1908. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 369 

C. A. Paul acquired his early education in the district schools and afterward 
attended the Normal high school and also the Ohio State University. He was a 
youth of thirteen years when in 1874 his father removed with the family from 
Erie to Huron county and established his home upon a farm in Bronson town- 
ship, where he is still living. He is numbered among the extensive and success- 
ful farmers and stock-raisers, making a specialty of the raising of fine cattle. His 
son, C. A. Paul, is an only child. His youthful days were passed under the pa- 
rental roof but, not desiring to follow agricultural pursuits as a life work he turned 
his attention to manufacturing interests, with which he was connected for two 
years after leaving school. He then took up the banking business in which he 
has since continued and is now vice-president of the Citizens Banking Company. 
He also owns two farms in Huron county and from this property derives a sub- 
stantial annual income. 

In 1893 Mr. Paul was united in marriage to Miss Clara Cannon, a native of 
Cleveland and a daughter of Captain Thomas Wilson, an extensive ship owner. 
Mr. Paul is identified with the Congregational church. He is preeminently a man 
of affairs with large and varied interests and wields a wide influence. As a busi- 
ness man and financier he ranks prominent among the men of force in the com- 
munity because of his ready recognition and utilization of opportunities. He has 
made no backward steps in his life, his course being characterized by continuous 
progress toward the goal of prosperity. His business affairs, although extensive, 
have not hurt his active participation in movements relative to the public good and 
throughout the community he is known as a public-spirited citizen whose interest 
in the general welfare has been manifest in many tangible ways. 



JOSEPH H. POST. 



Joseph H. Post, whose name is known throughout Ohio and other states in 
the Union in connection with thoroughbred Delaine merino sheep, now owns a 
farm of eighty-three acres in New London township, in the operation of which he 
is meeting with most gratifying success. He is numbered among the native sons 
of Huron county, his birth having occurred in Hartland township on the 18th 
of January, 1859. 

Reared to agricultural pursuits, he attended the public schools of his native 
township in the acquirement of his education, and during the periods of vacation 
he assisted in the work of the home farm. He continued to devote his time to 
his text-books until eighteen years of age, when his father's feeble health made 
it necessary for him to take charge of his business affairs. The father passed away 
when Mr. Post was twenty-one years of age, and he continued to reside upon 
the homestead, directing his efforts to its management, until 1903, when the prop- 
erty was divided. He then purchased eighty-three acres of fine farm land in New 
London township, upon which he has since made his home. Here he has en- 
gaged in general agricultural pursuits, bringing his fields under a high state of cul- 
tivation, while for many years he was identified with sheep-raising interests, mak- 
ing a specialty of thoroughbred Delaine merino sheep. He was eminently suc- 



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370 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

cessful in this branch of his business, gaining the reputation of having one of the 
best breeding flocks of sheep in Ohio. On account of ill health, however, he was 
obliged to give up his stock interests, since which time he has confined himself 
to general farming. The Post sheep, however, are still well known and are a 
very popular breed throughout Ohio and adjoining states, while their reputation 
has even extended as far west as the state of Washington, where they are handled 
by the Baldwin Sheep & Ranch Company. Mr. Post has enjoyed a substantial 
income from the fact that both branches of his business — the raising of grain and 
the breeding of sheep — have proved profitable, while his indefatigable industry, 
his intelligently directed labors, his close application and his good business ability 
have been salient characteristics in his success. 

It was in 1885 that Mr. Post was united in marriage to Miss Minnie E. Mil- 
ler, a native of Hartland township, born on the 1st of November, 1868, and a 
daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Miller, residents of Hartland township. Mr. 
Post gives loyal support to the republican party and is now serving as township 
trustee, while he has also been township appraiser, at all times performing the 
duties of these offices in a prompt, efficient and highly satisfactory manner. Hav- 
ing spent his entire life in Huron county, he has gained an extensive circle of 
friends within its borders, and the fact that he is most liked and respected where 
best known is an indication that the principles which actuate him in his relations 
with his fellowmen are in harmony with those which govern honorable and upright 
manhood. 



JOSEPH H. COUTANT. 

The Coutant family of Greenwich township is known as one of the early pio- 
neers of the county Several of its members still reside here at advanced age, and 
all are respected for their integrity and uprightness. Four of the original family 
of eleven children born to Jasper and Phobe (Burdsell) Coutant are still liv- 
ing: Gideon, Joseph H. and Benjamin, of Greenwich township, respectively aged 
ninety, eighty-eight and eighty-five years and Burdsell, aged eighty, residing in 
Wood county, Ohio. The parents of these children lived in Monroe county, 
Pennsylvania, the father dying there at a comparatively early age. The 
grandfather Burdsell and family moved to Ohio in 1833, together with other 
relatives. After the death of Mr. Coutant, the widow, in 1856, followed her sons 
and relatives and passed the remainder of her life in the Buckeye state, dying in 
1896, at the extreme old age of one hundred years and one hundred days. 

Joseph H. Coutant, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born in what is 
now Monroe county, Pennsylvania, September 19, 1820. Ten years after the emi- 
gration of the Burdsells, Gideon and Joseph H. Coutant decided to come to what 
was then referred to as the "Great West." They made the journey in the usual 
manner of the times — overland by horses and wagon. Upon arriving they settled 
in the forest and carved out of nature's bounty a log-cabin home. Four years 
passed before Joseph was ready to take upon himself the responsibilities of mar- 
ried life, but on October 18, 1847, ne brought to his cabin home a wife, formerly 
Miss Mary Jane Hoyt. She was a member of a pioneer family also, who had 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 371 

emigrated to Ohio from New York, being originally from Connecticut. Three 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Coutant: Ella Gertrude, Edward H. and 
Charles, the last dying in infancy. Ella and Edward are unmarried and reside 
with their father on the old home farm, the mother having died in November, 
1883. 

After marriage, Joseph H. Coutant settled on his present farm and has con- 
tinued his residence thereon to the present time. As prosperity came he invested 
in land and has for many years been known as one of the largest real-estate hold- 
ers in the county ; his present holdings comprising three hundred acres of highly 
improved land. 

Mr. Coutant has been a model citizen, taking up such duties as came to him 
and performing them in an intelligent and efficient manner. He served many years 
on the school board of his township, as township trustee, and in other public mat- 
ters his voice has always been raised in support of that which would elevate the 
moral tone of the community. A whig in his early manhood, voting first for "Tip- 
pecanoe and Tyler too," he took part in the evolution of affairs which produced 
the republican party. His vote is now cast in that party's favor and he is proud 
to claim a charter membership therein. His religious life has been passed in the 
Society of Friends, having had a birthright membership. He has been active in 
the work of the church and still loves "the precincts of the sanctuary." Although 
of advanced age, Mr. Coutant is vigorous and active and is passing his closing 
years in the cheerful habits of industry formed in his youth, surrounded by 
friends who esteem him for his unquestionable worth. 



ANDREW MISSLER. 



Andrew Missler, carrying on agricultural pursuits in Sherman township, is 
one of the prosperous and progressive farmers of this section of the county, who 
has, moreover, been an extensive landowner in the past, but has given away con- 
siderable property to his sons. He still owns a farm of one hundred and eighty- 
five acres upon which he resides and which he continues to operate. A native 
of Germany, he was born June 27, 1848, a son of Andrew and Frances Missler. 
The parents, who were reared and married in the fatherland, brought their family 
to the United States in 1854, settling first in Adams county, Ohio, where they 
remained for one year. A removal was then made to Huron county, and here their 
remaining days were passed, the father passing away March 19, 1871, while 
the mother's demise occurred six weeks later. In their family were the follow- 
ing children: Anna, deceased; Joseph; Margaret, Elizabeth and Caroline, who 
have all passed away ; Catherine; Anthony, a soldier of the Civil war who is now 
deceased ; Peter, who is also dead ; and Andrew, of this review. 

In the district schools of Huron county Andrew Missler acquired his educa- 
tion, and remained a student up to his fifteenth year, when, setting aside his text- 
books, he shouldered his ax and went into the woods to assist in clearing the 
land. At that time much of the district was covered with native timber and the 
trees had to be removed ere the work of improvement could be begun. From 
an early age he assisted in the work of developing a new farm, and he has since 



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372 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

continued to make agriculture his life work. Upon attaining manhood ho em- 
barked in business on his own account and purchased ninety acres from his father, 
for which he paid four thousand dollars. He later acquired fifty-three and a half 
acres from Worthington Imps, which cost thirty-five hundred dollars, another 
tract of fifty-five and a half acres from Anthony Gerhardstein, for which he paid 
twenty-five hundred dollars, and he paid thirty-five hundred dollars for eighty- 
one acres purchased from Frank Ruffing. The farm upon which he now resides 
includes one hundred and twenty-three acres bought from. Joseph Ruffing for nine 
thousand dollars. He became known as one of the extensive land owners of Sher- 
man township, but he has since given three different farms to his sons and con- 
templates giving another one next year. This continuous and steady accumular 
tion of property is but the visible evidence of the prosperity that came to him as the 
years went by, for he is a practical, progressive and successful farmer, who pos- 
sesses also the ability of keen judgment and good business management. 

On the 13th of September, 1870, Mr. Missler was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Meyers, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Meyers, farming people of 
Seneca county, Ohio. She is one of a family of six children, the other members 
of the family being Benjamin, Mary, John, Jacob and Catherine. The home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Missler has been blessed with nine children, as follows: J. Andrew; 
Catherine; Mary; Joseph; John; Jacob, deceased; Fred; Otto; and Clara, who 
died December 14, 1907. 

The family attend the Catholic church and Mr. Missler gives his support to the 
democracy where national issues are concerned. However he reserves the right 
to vote independently in local matters, casting his ballot for the men and meas- 
ures which in his judgment will best conserve the public good. He has served 
as road supervisor and is always interested in all matters pertaining to the upbuild- 
ing and growth of the community. He has attained success in his chosen field of 
labor, but his prosperity has come to him as the direct result of industry, energy, 
perseverance and well directed efforts. He stands high in the honor and esteem 
of his fellowmen and is recognized as one of the valuable and representative citi- 
zens of Sherman township. 



GEORGE W. BAKER. 



George W. Baker, one of the younger farmers of Greenfield township, who 
with his brother August manages the one hundred and sixty-five acres of land 
owned by their mother, was born in Peru township, Huron county, August 
27, 1874. His parents, George P. and Elizabeth (Miller) Baker, were both of 
German birth, but spent the greater part of their lives in this country. The 
father was twenty-eight when he started life in the United States. He came 
direct to Ohio and settled in Sandusky, where he found employment during the 
winter months in the boiler shops, and during the summer on the lakes. About 
1870 he came to Huron county, locating in Peru township, where he first worked 
for Philip Erf for a number of years, and then bought one hundred acres of 
land, on which he lived and farmed until 1902, when he sold it and removed to 
Greenfield township. The Peru township farm was largely covered with tim- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 375 

ber when he first settled there, an entirely different piece of property from that 
which his successor found, for Mr. Baker had not only brought the fields to 
a high state of cultivation, but had also erected some fine buildings. In 1902 he 
bought from Mrs. Shields the farm that is known as the old Simmons place. 
On it he made his home until his death, and on it his widow and sons still live. 
It, also, has profited by the Bakers' residence, for the buildings have been 
remodeled, and a more scientific and up-to-date system of agriculture has been 
carried on that has increased its productiveness and enabled it to produce a bet- 
ter quality of crops. Mr. Baker was released from the cares of this world 
September 19, 1907, but his wife still survives at the age of fifty-six. She was 
eighteen when she came to this country with her brother, William Miller, and 
in the years of her married life became the mother of six children : George, of 
this review is the eldest. August was born January 17, 1876. Lena died at 
one year of age. John died at the age of six months. Albert married Lena 
Lovell, an adopted daughter of Mrs. Martha Lovell of this township, and they 
have three children: Jeannette, Elizabeth and Raymond, and live in Greenfield 
township. Bertha, the youngest of the family, married Peter Zieher and lives 
at Sandusky, Ohio. They have one son, Bernhart George. 

George W. Baker has always lived in this county, receiving his training to 
meet the problems of life at home and in the district schools. For a few terms 
he was a pupil in the German school of Peru township, so that his education is 
better than that which falls to the lot of many boys reared on a farm and com- 
pelled to get their lesson at odd moments when work did not claim their time 
and in the few months during which the school held session. He has been suc- 
cessful in the farming he has conducted on his land, but has not specialized in 
any particular branch. 

On the 26th of October, 1901, Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss 
Merrill Perry, a daughter of Fred and Mary (Gates) Perry, of Penn town- 
ship, who were among the early settlers of that locality, and have many stories 
to tell of the changes that have taken place since they first took up their resi- 
dence there. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have an adopted daughter, Loretia Meyers, a 
little girl of six years of age. August Baker, who assists his brother in the 
conduct of the farm, was married in 1904 to Miss Anna Christ, of Erie county. 
They have a son George, a stalwart little child in whom many hopes are placed. 
The Baker family are members of the Lutheran church of Pontiac, which 
George P. Baker helped to build and in which he always held office. The sons 
are still active in its affairs and in the general tenor of their lives give evidence 
of its teachings. 



JOHN DRURY. 



John Drury, a farmer of Lyme township, Huron county, owning seventy-five 
acres of land near Bellevue, upon which he lives, was born on this farm, March 
7, 1847. The Drury family originally came from England in 1632, settling in 
one of the New England states. Our subject's great-grandfather bore the name 



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376 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

of Jonathan Drury, while his grandfather was John Drury, who was born in Mas- 
sachusetts and became the father of ten children, two sons and eight daughters. 
Our subject's father, Jonathan Maynard Drury, was born in Worthington, Mas- 
sachusetts, February 24, 1809. In the course of time he married Miss Abigail 
Maynard Knowlton, a daughter of Benjamin Knowlton, of New Fane, Vermont, 
where Miss Abigail was born June 29, 181 2. In 1837, tne vear subsequent to his 
marriage, Jonathan Drury came to Huron county, Ohio, on a prospecting tour. 
The following season he moved his family to Lyme township, this county, set- 
tling upon a small rented farm. For several years he worked for the diffierent 
farmers until, in 1842, he was able to buy a tract of sixty- four acres of land, to 
which he added until he had a tract of one hundred and ten acres, upon a part of 
which his son lives at the present day. A log cabin was his first habitation and 
served him until 1857, when he put up a fine brick residence, only one of the many 
extensive improvements he made on the place. Jonathan Drury was a life-long 
member of the Lyme Congregational church, of which he was a deacon for over 
fifty years, and when death called him, August 13, 1897, the community felt they 
had lost an esteemed member. By his first marriage there were three children 
born : Ellen M., who died at the age of seventeen ; Caroline T., who was but six 
at the time of her death ; and John, the subject of this sketch. After the death of 
his first wife which occurred May 8, 1847, Mr. Drury married Mrs. Clarissa 
Barnard Wrisley, by whom he had one son Miron Maynard, who was born on 
the home farm, June 19, 1853. He married Miss Ida Osborn and is a prominent 
business man of Chicago, Illinois, making his home in Evanston. Four children 
have been born to him: Walter M., Louise, Burton E. and Allen B. By her 
former marriage Mrs. Clarissa Drury had two sons: George A., now deceased, 
and Allen B., both prominent soap manufacturers of Chicago, where they started 
in business in 1861. 

John Drury has lived all the years of his life on the old home farm, which 
he inherited from his father. His education was acquired at the public and high 
schools of Bellevue. Upon completing his own schooling he taught for two win- 
ters in York township, Sandusky county, while during the summer seasons he 
followed the life of a farmer, as he had from the days of his childhood. In the 
quiet pursuit of his vocation his days have been passed. He fell heir to his father's 
property, as he had followed in his footsteps and not only in the matter of busi- 
ness but also as regards functions bestowed by the good will of his fellows, for 
upon his father's death he was made deacon of the church. Of its Sunday school 
he has been superintendent for fifteen years and for a period of over thirty years 
has been clerk of the congregation. 

Mr. Drury was twice married, the first time to Miss Ida Mary Cowle, a 
d? lighter of John and Anna (Ford) Cowle, of Bellevue, whom he married Feb- 
ruary 8, 1 871. There was one daughter, Edith Ellen, born to this union, but she 
died in infancy, being born May 27, 1873, an d dying the 16th of August following. 
Mrs. Drury, who was born September 12, 1846, died February 4, 1887, an d on the 
8th of May, 1889, Mr. Drury married Mrs. Josephine (Wright) Nims, a daugh- 
ter of John and Betsy (Ford) Wright. John Wright was the founder of the 
Wright Banking Company, of Bellevue, and its president until his death, and at 
one time he owned three thousand acres of land in this section of the state. Mrs. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 377 

Josephine (Wright) Drury was born April 16, 1848, in Groton township, Erie 
county, Ohio, and by her former marriage had one child, Walter Worthington 
Nims, who lives at Strongs Ridge, Lyme township. He married Miss Mamie 
L. Newton and has one child, born January 1, 1909. 

His long residence and connection with affairs in this county has made Mr. 
Drury well known in this locality. Looking back over his past life, which has 
been filled with earnest endeavor, no greater praise can be given than by saying 
he is a worthy son of an esteemed father. 



ROBERT ARTHUR. 



Robert Arthur, who has the distinction of being the largest landowner of Hu- 
ron county, Ohio, resides upon a farm of thirteen hundred acres in Greenfield 
township, to the cultivation of which he is directing his entire energies. He was 
born in this township on the 4th of March, 1829, in an old log house situated about 
three-quarters of a mile from his present home, and is a son of John and Martha 
(Easter) Arthur. The father was born near Londonderry, Ireland, in 1797, and 
in 1822 he brought his wife and one child to the United States, purchasing a small 
' farm in Greenfield township, Huron county. Upon the land stood a log house in 
which they began their housekeeping, while Mr. Arthur at once commenced clear- 
ing the land for the purpose of cultivation. Soon he had improved the entire tract 
and was so prosperous in his undertaking that as the years went by he was able 
to add to his original holdings and at the time of his death he was the owner of 
an excellent farm of three hundred acres. He was a member of the Congrega- 
tional church of Steuben and assisted in building that church, in which he was an 
office-holder up to the time of his death. He was a man of fine principles who 
was respected and esteemed throughout the community in which he resided. He 
passed away in 1890, while his wife, who was also born in Ireland, was eighty- 
four years of age at the time of her death. In their family were six children, 
namely: Margaret, who was born in Ireland and is the deceased wife of Alex- 
ander Lewis, who has also passed away ; Anna J., who married James McPher- 
son and resides at Steuben, Ohio, being the oldest resident of that town, a sketch 
of whom is found elsewhere in this volume; Mary, who married Thomas Irv- 
ing, both of whom are now deceased; William, who passed away at the age of 
seventy years ; Robert, of this review ; and Kathryn, also deceased. All were born 
in this township with the exception of the eldest, whose birth occurred before the 
parents left Ireland. 

Amid the wholesome scenes and environments of agricultural life Robert Ar- 
thur was reared to manhood, and during the intervening years he attended the 
district schools in the acquirement of a good education that fitted him for the re- 
sponsible and practical duties of life. Under the direction of his father he also 
learned valuable lessons concerning the best methods of cultivating the fields, and 
in the broader school of experience received thorough and comprehensive train- 
ing. He has devoted his entire life to general farming, in which he has been 
eminently successful, and by indefatigable energy, untiring diligence and intelli- 



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378 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

gently applied labor he has been able to add, from time to time, to his property 
holdings until today he is the most extensive landowner in Huron county, having 
in his possession about thirteen hundred acres of fine farming land. 

On the 27th of February, 1867, Mr. Arthur was united in marriage to Miss 
Julia Cook, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wyet Cook, residents of Peru township. 
In that township she was born in 1843 an d On the 20th of April, 1901, was called 
to her final rest, her death being the cause of deep regret to a large number of 
warm friends. Beside her husband she left to mourn her loss fivt children, 
namely : Mattie, who still resides at home ; Clarence, who married Inez Hill, by 
whom he has two children, Margaret and Francis, and who resides upon and ope- 
rates the home farm ; J. V., who married Irene Otes and with his wife and three 
children, Aubrey, John M. and Annetta, resides near Steuben, Ohio; Laura, the 
wife of James Trimmer of Fairfield township, by whom she has six children, 
Helen, Arthur, Marian, Julia, Jeanette and Charles, the family residence being 
at North Fairfield, Ohio; and Fred, residing at Steuben, who married Alice Barre 
and has two children, Robert and Malcolm. 

Mr. Arthur's religious faith is indicated in his membership in the Congre- 
gational church of Steuben, in which he has been a trustee for a great number of 
years. He gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and has served 
in several township offices on that ticket, being trustee of the township for four 
terms and a school director for a long period. He has already passed the Psalm- 
ist's allotted span of three score years and ten, having reached the eightieth mile- 
stone on life's journey, while his entire career has been passed within the borders 
of Huron county, where his fellow citizens know him as a straightforward and re- 
liable man and an enterprising farmer, who well deserves the esteem and high re- 
gard that is uniformly accorded him. 



WILLIAM GAMBLE. 



William Gamble, who is now living retired in a comfortable home in Steuben, 
Huron county, was for many years closely identified with the agricultural in- 
terests of Greenfield township, where he owned farming property. Mr. Gamble 
was born in Lincolnshire, England, October 15, 1842, and was but six months 
old when brought by his parents, Thomas and Mary' (Rick) Gamble, to the United 
States. The father was born December 21, 1806, and at an early day came to 
the new world, establishing his home in New York, where he remained about fif- 
teen months. He then continued his journey westward, and with his family set- 
tled in Monroeville, Huron county, where for a time he was in the employ of the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. Believing, however, that farm life would 
prove more congenial, he began in a small way by purchasing ten acres of land in 
Fairfield township. He then took up his abode on this place and made it his home 
until his wife died, when he disposed of his farming interests and removed to Illi- 
nois, making his home with a daughter during the succeeding eight years. He 
once more returned to Huron county and entered the employ of Barnett Roe in 
a mill. Later he in partnership with his son purchased sixty-six acres of land in 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 379 

Greenfield township and for thirty-one years was actively identified with agricul- 
tural pursuits, his death occurring April 8, 1895, when he had reached the ex- 
treme old age of eighty-eight years, and his remains lie buried in the cemetery 
at Steuben. As above stated, his wife bore the maiden name of Mary Rick, and 
they became the parents of two sons and a daughter: William, of this review; 
Joseph, who left home about forty-five years ago, since which time he has not 
been heard from ; and Mary Ann, who makes her home in Minnesota. The wife 
and mother lived but a few years after coming to the United States, her death oc- 
curring in 1849, her remains being interred at Olena, in Bronson township, Hu- 
ron county. * 

William Gamble accompanied his parents on their various removals after com- 
ing to this country but he was mainly reared in Huron county, where he also ac- 
quired his education, which, however, was somewhat limited, owing to the primi- 
tive condition of the newly settled district. After reaching mature years he and his 
father purchased sixty-six acres of land in Greenfield township, which they culti- 
vated for thirty-one years. Eventually Mr. Gamble added a tract of sixty-six 
acres to the original purchase and made all the improvements upon the place. He 
erected a house arid barn but the latter was destroyed by fire but was soon re- 
placed by another. Throughout a long period he was closely identified with farm- 
ing interests but in 1903 he disposed of his farm property to Mrs. Samuel Wag- 
ner and purchased a nice home in Steuben, where he has since made his home. He 
has here four and a half acres of ground, which is kept in good condition and 
today he is numbered among the worthy retired citizens of this village. 

Mr. Gamble was united in niarriage to Miss Elizabeth Bennett, a daughter 
of Allen and Harriett (Youngs) Bennett, the ceremony being performed on the 
9th of February, 1864. Mrs. Gamble was born in New Haven township, Hu- 
ron county, her paternal grandfather, James Youngs, having been a pioneer settler 
of that district. Her father was born in the Empire state in 1823 and departed this 
life in 1859, when but thirty-six years of age. The mother was born in Auburn 
township, Richland county, Ohio, in 1827, an d was married in Greenfield town- 
ship to Mr. Youngs. Her death occurred in 1857, when she was but thirty years 
old. Their family numbered two sons and two daughters, namely : Elizabeth, now 
Mrs. Gamble ; James, a resident of Illinois ; Charles, of Indiana ; and Mary, who 
died at the age of nine years. Mrs. Gamble was but nine years of age at the time 
of her parents' death, and she was then taken into the home of her grandfather, 
James Youngs, by whom she was carefully reared and educated. She made her 
home with her grandfather until the time of her marriage. She has become the 
mother of five children, as follows : Lillian, the wife of Charles Earl, of Fairfield 
township, by whom she has one child, Fannie; Helen, who is the wife of Fred 
Sparks, of Peru township, and the mother of three children, Maud, Walter and 
Stamford ; William Thomas, who wedded Ella Brant, of Chicago, Ohio, by whom 
he has had three children, Lawrence, Dale and Wilma, but the latter is now de- 
ceased ; Jay, who wedded Ethel Brant, their home being in Norwalk, Ohio ; and 
Mary, who died at the age of eleven months. 

Mr. Gamble is independent in his political views and affiliations and for the 
past ten years has served as township trustee. He has also held other public offices, 
having been elected on both the republican and democratic tickets. He has now 



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380 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

passed the sixty-seventh milestone on life's journey and the greater part of this 
period has been passed in Huron county, so that few men have more intimate 
knowledge of its history or of events which have left their impress upon its an- 
nals. He has spent a busy, active and useful life and he and his estimable wife 
are now enjoying in retirement the accumulations of profitable, successful and 
honorable careers. 



CLARENCE E. STOTTS. 

One of the native sons of Ripley township, successful in his agricultural pur- 
suits and prominent in local business circles is Clarence E. Stotts, who lives upon 
the old homestead and enjoys the home which for so many years was the resi- 
dence of his father. He was born November 3, 1863, and is a son of Abram and 
Mariette (Boughton) Stotts. The father, born December 5, 1822, in Belmont 
county, Ohio, was the son of John and Eva (Winter) Stotts, the latter a native 
of Virginia, and was the eldest of nine children: Abram, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Mar- 
tin K., Catherine, George, Daniel and Elizabeth. He was the first born and he 
was the last to die. The eighty-six years of his life, his death occurring July 21, 
1909, were crowded with activities of the highest order and of profit to others. 
A man whose advantages in his youth had been limited, the success of his life in 
farming and in the business world was due entirely to his own efforts. The Hu- 
ron County Insurance Company was organized in his house, that in which Clar- 
ence E. Stotts lives today, and he was elected its first president. He was also 
a director of the First National Bank at Greenwich for a period of two years. 
The people of Ripley township frequently called upon him to fill the various offices 
which were at their disposal and twice, in 1875 an d in 1878, he was elected on 
the republican ticket to fill the post of commissioner for Huron county. In the 
Baptist church at North Fairfield he was also prominent, and he administered the 
duties of trustee and deacon with wisdom and decorum. In short he was a man 
who made a place for himself in the fore ranks despite the fact that he was handi- 
capped in the struggle for life by limited early training. His wife, who before her 
marriage was Miss Mariette Boughton, was born in Allegany county, New York, 
June 12, 1 83 1, and was the daughter of John and Susan (Benedict) Boughton, 
who came to Ohio in 1835 and took up the work of the early pioneers. She 
was one of ten children, the others being Solon, Orlando, Cordier, Lucius, Elon, 
Theodore, Oscar, Sanford and Silicia. Mr. and Mrs. Abram Stotts were the pa- 
rents of four children. Flora A. married John W. Hopkins, and they have one 
son, Fred A. Eunice Adell married T. A. Hilton, and they have two children, 
Flora E. and Alfred W. Clarence E.. the third of the family, is the subject of 
this sketch. Elmer A. married Miss Mildred Kaylor and they have one daughter, 
Blanche. Mrs. Stotts preceded her husband to the grave by some nine years, her 
death having occurred May 31, 1901. 

Clarence E. Stotts has followed farming as his vocation through nearly all 
of his life and is accounted a successful agriculturist. He has found wide play for 
the exercise of his large business ability as well, for he has been one of the direc- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 381 

tors of the First National Bank at Greenwich ever since its organization and has 
assisted in maintaining that institution upon its sound financial basis. In politics 
he has ever espoused the cause of the republican party, though he has never been 
active in its ranks nor a seeker of official recognition. He has, nevertheless, served 
the people of this township very efficiently as a justice of the peace and for seven 
years as a member of the school board and was ever found to administer his 
duties in accordance with what he believed to be right. 

On the 19th of September, 1889, Mr. Stotts was married to Miss Mabel Love- 
land, who was born June 4, 1870, in New Haven township, this county, and is 
the only daughter of Rockwell and Roxana (Knight) Loveland. The father, 
who was born in New Haven township, June 9, 1838, was the son of John Love- 
land, who was one of the pioneers of Huron county, having come here in 1822, 
when he was twenty-four years of age, settling in New Haven township. His 
wife was Miss Calista Curtiss before her marriage. Rockwell Loveland, besides 
participating in the work of the pioneers, which was not completed when he be- 
came old enough to assist, fought valiantly for three years for the preservation 
of the Union during the Civil war. He was in the navy on the Mississippi flag- 
ship Black Hawk and was in the Red River expedition, serving under General 
Farragut. Mrs. Stotts' mother, who was Miss Roxana Knight before her mar- 
riage, was the daughter of William and Jane (Johnson) Knight, the former a 
native of Boston, Massachusetts, the latter of Connecticut. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Stotts three children have been born: Harold, born August 18, 1891 ; Alta B., 
born April 19, 1894; and Hazel Mae, born October 25, 1908. The children are 
all at home, and in the Baptist faith, which the father and mother have pro- 
fessed, they have been reared. A man who has been fortunate in his own affairs 
and has been found trustworthy in his relations to others, Mr. Stotts enjoys the re- 
spect of all who know him and the strong friendship of his Masonic brothers in 
particular. 



SAN FORD H. KING. 



Sanford H. King is a retired farmer who, having passed the seventy-second 
milestone on life's journey, is now living retired in the enjoyment of rest which 
he has truly earned and richly deserves. He is living in North Fairfield and has 
spent almost his entire life in Huron county. He is a native of New York, his 
birth having occurred in the Empire state on the 13th of May, 1837. His pa- 
rents were Elias and Catherine (Mott) King, whose family numbered but three 
children, the others being Barzilla and Mary. It was in the year 1838 that the 
parents left the east and came with their family to Ohio, establishing their home 
in Huron county. 

Sanford H. King was only about a year old at the time and, therefore, for 
even more than the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten he has 
lived in this part of the state, witnessing its growth and development as the years 
have gone by. He has lived to see notable changes for the native forests have 
been cut away, the land cultivated and now the pioneer district is a region of val- 



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382 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

uable farms in the midst of which are found flourishing towns and cities with 
their industrial and commercial interests. In his youthful days Mr. King assisted 
in the labors of the home farm and experience taught him the value of industry 
and perseverance. His educational training was received in the public schools 
which he attended through the winter seasons. As he attained his majority he re- 
solved to follow as a life work the occupation to which he had been reared and 
took up the task of farming on his own account. Year by year he carefully 
and diligently cultivated the crops best adapted to the soil and climate and as time 
passed won success in his labors. He is still the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Fairfield township, from which he derives a substantial income, 
although he is now living retired, leaving the work of the farm to others. 

On the ist of March, i860, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Julia Mc- 
Kelvey, who was born in Ohio May 4, 1835, and is a daughter of Robert and 
Mary (Prosser) McKelvey. They have a large family of children: Julia, Cath- 
erine, Betsy, Almira, Harriet, Lyman, Perry, George, Angeline, Roena, Mack and 
Lily. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. King was blessed with four children; Eu- 
gene, born in i860; Jennie, born in 1865; Fred, born in 1869; and Ernest, who 
was born in 1876 and was killed by the cars in December, 1897. Fred married 
Delia Barre and they have one child, Lloyd. The parents are members of the 
Baptist church, to the support of which they make liberal contribution. Mr. 
King is a republican in politics and is thoroughly conversant with the leading* 
questions and issues of the day. He has served as a trustee but has not been ac- 
tive as a political worker or an office seeker. His fraternal relations are with the 
Masons and in his life he exemplifies the benevolent spirit of the craft which is 
based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. His long residence in 
the county has made him well known here and his memory forms a connecting 
link between the primitive past and progressive present. Upon his memory are 
impressed many scenes and events of the early day which marked the progress 
of the community and indicated what was the condition that existed through the 
days of his boyhood in this part of the state. 



MARTHA M. LOVELL. 

One of the persons, who despite her many years, still retains a deep interest 
in the affairs of Greenfield township, is Mrs. Martha A. Lovell, who owns two 
hundred and seventeen acres of land, on which she lives, part of it being the farm 
on which her husband was born. Her birth occurred in Paris, now Plymouth, 
Ohio, on the 31st of March, 1831, her parents being Matthew and Nancy (Adams) 
McKelvey. The former came to Huron county with his father and an older 
brother and settled in Greenfield township on the farm where Robert Arthur now 
lives. The land was then heavily timbered, which three men had to clear before 
they could put up the log house which was their home while they lived there. 
After some years, they removed to Plymouth, where the elder McKelvey died, 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 387 

closing a career that had experienced many hardships and privations, for he had 
been a soldier of the Revolutionary war and had lost one of his limbs in battle. 

Matthew McKelvey was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
uary 30, 1794, and was but little more than twenty years of age when on the 27th 
of March, 1818, he was united in wedlock to Miss Nancy Adams. She was two 
and a half years his junior and was born in Marlboro, Vermont. Mr. McKelvey 
passed the greater part of his life in this county and was one of the pioneer dry- 
good merchants of Plymouth. Later he removed to Harding county, Ohio, 
where his wife and three of his daughters died, and then returned to Plymouth. 
There he passed away on the 18th of March, 1853, ten years and three months 
after his helpmate had gone to her final resting-place. Mr. and Mrs. McKelvey 
were the parents of ten children: Elizabeth, who was born February 12, 1819, 
and died 1834; Marion and Mary, twins, born January 9, 1821, the former dying 
June 25, 1823, the latter July 23, 1842; Sarah, who was born May 5, 1823, and 
died July 23, 1841 ; Nancy, who was born November 8, 1824, and died July 19, 
1841 ; George, who was born June 28, 1826, and died September 18, 1827; Jane, 
who was born June 9, and died July 21, 1841 ; Martha M., now Mrs. Lovell; 
Matho, born February 25, 1832, now a resident of Tiffin, Ohio ; and John, born 
February 8, 1835, wno nves at Sandusky, Ohio, and is a member of the Firelands 
Historical Society. 

Mrs. Lovell attended the public schools of Plymouth until she was 17 and 
for one year continued her studies at Fairfield. She then entered upon 
the career of a teacher, which she followed until she was married, on the 
30th of December, 1854, to Ethan C. Lovell, a son of David and Mary 
(Chilcoot) Lovell. His father came here in the early days of the county and 
took up fifty acres of land which is included in the farm Mrs. Lovell now owns. 
At the time of his arrival the land was covered with heavy timber which he had 
to clear away before he could build the little log house, which was the first home 
of his family. Later he was able to build a fine brick residence, for he prospered 
in his affairs. Ethan C. Lovell was born June 17, 1819, grew up at home on the 
farm, and in turn, became a prominent farmer and stock raiser. He was noted 
for his honesty and carefulness, and it is recorded of him that he kept a regular 
set of books, in which were entered the transactions of each day. In 1858, he 
built the large frame house in which his widow still lives and which he was per- 
mitted to enjoy for forty years. A hard worker and thrifty, he made a secure posi- 
tion for himself in the hearts of the people of the township, who mourned his 
loss deeply when death called him on the 27th of April, 1898. 

Not blessed with any children of her owti, Mrs. Lovell has given the privil- 
eges of a home and maternal care to two girls, one of whom remained with 
her from the time she was six years of age until she married George Mannard, 
when she went to live in Virginia. Lena Clark, the other girl, was twelve years 
of age when she came to live with Mrs. Lovell, with whom she made her home 
until she married Albert Baker, of this township. 

Mrs. Lovell is a very well preserved woman, who is old only in years and not 
in spirit, looks or actions. Her life has always been one of activity and when 
her husband was living she would cook all the meals for the farm hands. She 
also tells with a touch of pardonable pride that she did some of the painting on 



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388 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

the frame house in which she now lives. From her mother, who was the first 
teacher in Peru township, she inherits her love of books and reading, and in the 
years that have passed since she presided over a roomful of pupils, she has not 
forgotten her interest in education or in the affairs of the world generally. 



PHILANDER J. RIDDLE. 

Philander J. Riddle, one of the representative farmers of Richmond township 
and a man who has made his influence felt in both political and church circles, is 
the owner of one hundred and ten acres of fertile farm land in this township. 
He was born in Richland county, Ohio, January i, 1854, his parents being John 
and Amanda (Thornton) Riddle. The father was engaged all his life in agri- 
cultural pursuits and at the same time during earlier years he taught school, for 
eighteen years in the district schools and two years in the graded school at Bell- 
ville, Ohio, gaining an enviable reputation as a local educator. During the sum- 
mer, when released from his school duties, he carried on farming, thus combin- 
ing the two occupations very profitably. In 1865 the family came to Huron 
county, and this continued to be the home of the parents for the remainder of their 
lives, the father passing away in 1890, and his widow in 1893. They were the 
parents of the following children: Lydia, who married John Miller, of Chicago 
Junction ; Archibald, who is deceased ; Sybal, who married W. F. Miller ; Phil- 
ander J., who is mentioned below : John Jr. ; Lunetta, who married George Hatch ; 
and William, the youngest. 

Philander J. Riddle spent his boyhood as do so many sons of farmers, except 
that he had the advantage of belonging to a family where educational matters 
were considered of great importance, and he therefore secured an excellent school 
training, first in the district schools of Knox county until he was twelve years old, 
and after that in Huron county, thus continuing until he attained his majority, and 
at the same time he assisted his father on the farm in the summer. The first land 
owned by Mr. Riddle was located in Richland county and consisted of a hundred- 
acre farm he and his brother John bought and operated in partnership for five 
years. Following this venture, Mr. Riddle rented his present farm from his fa- 
ther-in-law and when the latter died he bought it. The Richland county farm 
was traded for Chicago, Ohio, property. During the time he has been the owner 
of his Richmond township farm, Mr. Riddle has devoted himself to improving it, 
and has brought it into a state that makes good crops almost a certainty, so that 
he can depend upon an excellent income from his investment of money, time and 
labor. 

On September 1, 1881, Mr. Riddle married Elmyra Snyder, a daughter of 
Hiram and Amelia Snyder, who came from the eastern part of Ohio to Huron 
county, being early settlers of this locality. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Simon; Mvria who married William Cheseman ; Jennie; Douglas; 
Elmyra, who became Mrs. Riddle; Ira; and Amanda, who married John Bager. 
Mr. and Mrs. Riddle have had but one child of their own, Walter, but they have 
adopted Ray White from an orphan asylum and propose to give him the same ad- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 391 

vantages enjoyed by their son. This one act sheds a light upon the truly Christian 
characters of these two and demonstrates that they believe in living out in their 
lives the teachings of their church. Walter Riddle married Cora Harmon, and 
their children are: May, Vernice, Harold, Lois and Dalton. 

Both Mr. Riddle and his wife are consistent members of the United Brethren 
church and are highly esteemed by their fellow members. When the present 
church was built he served on the building committee, while he is now church 
treasurer and a member of the board of parsonage trustees. For a number of 
years Mr. Riddle has been prominent in the republican party in this locality and 
is now serving as township treasurer with that same fidelity to obligations placed 
upon him that has resulted in his material advancement, and his winning and re- 
taining the friendship of his neighbors and church associates. 



EMMONS W. ROSS. 



Emmons W. Ross is descended from men who braved the terrors, dangers 
and hardships of the unknown forests and hewed out not only a home for them- 
selves but cleared land and prepared fields from which those generations that 
came after them would reap the gain. He is a farmer in the vicinity of Bough- 
tonville, Ripley township, and owns the one hundred and forty-two acres on which 
he lives. He was born in Auburn, Auburn township, Crawford county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 13, 1 861, and is the son of Royal R. and Mary (Aumend) Ross. The 
father, who was the son of Abel and Amelia (Emmons) Ross, was born in 1832 
in New York, while the mother, who was a daughter of Adam Aumend, was born 
in Crawford county in 1840, for her parents were among the pioneers there. 
Through their marriage Royal R. Ross and his wife became the parents of five 
children : Fred, William, one who died in infancy, Howard and Emmons. 

Emmons W. Ross has always been a farmer since his childhood's days, for as 
soon as he was able he did his share in the work that was carried on at home, and 
as he became older participated in the heavier labor of the fields. He experienced 
the same difficulty in obtaining an education that confronts the farmer's boys even 
today, but which were as nothing in comparison with the hardships of the pre- 
ceding generations, just as his life with its comforts affords a striking contrast 
to that of his uncle Resolved White, who it is said built the first frame house in 
Norwalk, as he was the first settler who was an adept in the carpenter's trade. 
But whatever the conditions under which he labored, they bred in him the desire 
and the determination to win success. This has come to him with the passage of 
the years and is due to his own exertions alone. 

On the 31st of March, 1893, Mr. Ross was united in marriage to Miss Daisy 
C. Daugherty, a daughter of D. W. and Alzina (Snyder) Daugherty. She was 
born in 1877 in Hardin county and was the elder of the two daughters born to 
her parents, Julia being the other. Mr. and Mrs. Ross have eight children : Vic- 
tor, born February 5, 1894; Russell R., July 6, 1896; Virgil, November 15, 1897; 
Ruth, May 12, 1899; Amy, January 30, 1901 ; Cecil, April 5, 1903; Milo, August 
3, 1906; and Glenn, May 5, 1908. 



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392 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

The family attend the Episcopal church at Plymouth, Ohio, and are con- 
scientious in their practice of its teachings. When called to exercise his franchise, 
Mr. Ross casts his ballot for the candidate and measures of the republican party, 
but aside from always being present at the polls at election, which he believes to 
be the duty of every citizen, he takes little active part in public affairs. He is a 
man highly regarded, nevertheless, for the strong qualities that mark his character. 



J. C. BOARDMAN. 



Among the many men who have witnessed the vast changes that have trans- 
pired since the opening of the early decades of the last century is J. C. Boardman, 
a farmer of Boughtonville, Ripley township. More than a witness, in fact, for he 
felled trees where are now teeming fields and built rough roads of logs where now 
stretch miles of macadam or gravel. The blood of men and women who had 
been pioneers flowed in his veins and the quickening impulse of the new life was 
in the very air he breathed from birth, for his father, Benaja Boardman, was said 
to have been the first white child born between Seneca and Cayuga lake. His 
birth occurred in 1794, and as he grew to manhood the desire possessed him to be- 
come a minister of the gospel and bring the word of light to those hardy people 
beyond the mountains. He was ordained in the Methodist church and came west 
to Ohio almost immediately, where by word and deed he urged the men and wo- 
men not to forget the needs of the soul and organized the congregation that they 
might worship in common. The field of his labors lay in this part of the state, 
but the influence oi his life and the message he brought were not confined by any 
boundaries. His wife, Miss Loura Ann Hurd in her maidenhood, was a sympa- 
thetic and encouraging helpmeet. She was born in 1799 in Connecticut and like 
her husband came from a family that had its genesis in England. She urged him 
to come to this Ohio wilderness in 1827, although she well knew that it meant 
the rearing of her children amid hardship and poverty. There were seven born to 
inherit this courage from mother and father: Caleb, Joshua, Samuel, Mary, Mar- 
tha, William and Benaja. 

J. C. Boardman was born in Richland county, this state, March 5, 1828. In 
the difficult life in which the parents struggled it was early necessary that he do 
his share of hard, strength-requiring work, such as is not known today, for he 
tells with pardcnable pride that at the age of fourteen he cleared an acre of timber 
that he might buy a pair of boots. He continued to fell trees for years, that the 
land might be converted into fruitful fields. Large numbers of the hewn logs 
were used in the construction of the historic plank roads, called corduroy roads 
in those days, and Mr. Boardman, still a young man, drove the ox-teams that 
dragged the massive tree trunks across the swamps to the place they were to be 
laid. With the advance in the times he has progressed ; a substantial income and 
comforts have replaced hardships and privations ; and in the growing community 
of Ripley township he filled a larger and larger place, a man highly respected and 
honored for his courage and the strength of his character. He now owns two 
hundred acres in Ripley township, is a stockholder in the Farmers' Bank at Green- 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 393 

wich, and as trustee and school director has assisted in the promotion of the in- 
terests and welfare of his fellow citizens. 

More than half a century ago Mr. Boardman was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen Ames. She was born in Ithaca, New York, in 1831, and was a daughter 
of Benjamin and Lydia (Ellis) Ames, who were of English exti action and came 
to Ohio in comparatively early days. On the 15th of September, 1903, the couple 
celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding and for five more years they 
were permitted to traverse life's highway together, until, on the 30th of June, 
1908, Mrs. Boardman was released from the cares of this world. She was a noble 
wife and a good mother to the four children born of her. These are Eva, Carrie, 
Benjamin and Frank. 

To the Methodist faith in which he was reared, Mr. Boardman has always 
given his adherence and in the little church of his township has taken a vital in- 
terest, having served the congregation as steward, trustee and class leader. In 
politics he has always given his support to the republican party, but he inclines 
more and more to some of the principles advocated by the prohibitionists. One of 
the oldest men of Ripley township, he is also one of its finest citizens, his life 
constantly being an example of industry, frugality and the guidance of sound 
principles. 



JONATHAN TRUMBULL MEAD. 

Jonathan Trumbull Mead, well known as a representative of agricultural life 
in Huron county, was born in Fitchville township, April 25, 1835. His birth 
occurred on the farm where he now resides, his father, Peter Mead, having taken 
up this tract of one hundred and sixty-three acres as a claim from the government 
in 1814. Peter Mead removed from Greenwich, Connecticut, to Fairfield, New 
York, in 1812. His father, Peter Mead, Sr., had been a soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary war, serving for seven years in defense of colonial interests and holding 
the rank of sergeant. When the country again became engaged in war with Eng- 
land his son, Peter Mead, Jr., responded to the call to arms, taking part in the war 
of 1812. He was afterward a pensioner of the government, receiving eight dol- 
lars per month in recognition of the aid which he had rendered on the field of 
battle. 

Coming to Ohio at an early day Peter Mead, Jr., was one of the pioneers of 
Huron county and the first to establish a home in Fitchville township, taking up 
his abode here when much of the land was still in possession of the government. 
A greater part of it was covered with the native growth of timber and it required 
much arduous labor to transform it into productive fields. Peter Mead, Jr., how- 
ever, secured his claim and took up the difficult work of preparing the land for the 
plow. In clue course of time he made his place a productive tract, its fields yield- 
ing generous harvests. For several terms he filled the office of justice of the peace 
and J. T. Mead now has in his possession the law book which his father used and 
which was printed in 184 1. He also has a dress-coat which was worn by his 
grandfather over eighty years ago. Peter Mead kept the first real-estate records 
of Huron county and was closely connected with many other labors and events 



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394 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

which marked the train of progress. As the work of improvement was carried 
on in his section of the state Peter Mead, Jr., took an active part in the transfor- 
mation which was being wrought. On one occasion he gave to Amos Reynolds 
fifty acres of land and while assisting him in the woods, chopping down trees, both 
of them being barefooted at the time, Mr. Mead noticed some scars upon his com- 
panion's feet and asked how he came by them. Mr. Reynolds replied that when he 
was a boy fishing he, one day, fell into the water and cut his feet on some oyster 
shells and that he would have been drowned had it not been for the help of another 
boy who rescued him. Further questioning and response led to the conclusion 
that it was Peter Mead, who had performed the rescue, although each had lost 
knowledge of the other's whereabouts during the years which had elapsed after 
the incident had occurred. 

Reared upon the frontier, Jonathan Trumbull Mead was educated in one of 
the old time log schoolhouses in which the district schools of that day convened. 
He always remained upon the home farm, for his father died v,hen the son was 
but nineteen years of age and he afterward lived with his widowed mother who 
survived for many years, passing away July 3, 1884. In his farm work Mr. Mead 
was progressive and in the course of years erected new buildings upon the place 
and added many modern improvements which make the farm one of comfort and 
convenience. He is also ^n auctioneer, well known in connection with that work 
which he has followed coniinuously since 1855. He has conducted sales in a great 
many states in the Union, handling both merchandise and farm property and he 
still follows the same business. As the years have passed he has prospered in his 
undertakings, and has had extended landed possessions. Although he has re- 
cently sold one hundred acres he is still the owner of three hundred and eighty 
acres of choice Ohio land. 

On the 26th of June, i860, Mr. Mead was united in marriage to Miss Pamelia 
Jane Daniels, who was born in Ruggles township, Ashland county, Ohio, August 
20, 1839. Her father was William Daniels, who settled in Ashland county in 
pioneer times and died in 1870 at the age of sixty-two years. The mother passed 
away in 1906 when eighty-seven years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Mead have become 
the parents of four children: Rowena Jane, born July 7, 1861, and Charles New- 
berry, born June 19, 1873, who are still living, while Arilie Amorit and Kitty 
Belle have passed away. 

Mr. Mead is entitled to wear the Grand Army button from the fact that he 
enlisted in September, 1864, in the Twelfth Ohio Independent Battery under 
Captain Frank Jackson. He was a representative in the third generation in the 
family which has done splendid military service, his grandfather having been a 
soldier of the Revolution, his father of the war of 181 2, while his son Charles 
enlisted for service in the Spanish-American war with Troop A, of the First Ohio 
Cavalry. He supplemented his early education by study in Oberlin College. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mead have spent the last six winters in Florida, thus avoiding 
the rigors of the northern climate. His political allegiance has always been given 
to the republican party. Mrs. Mead attends the Congregational church, with 
which she has long held membership. Mr. Mead is among the oldest of the native 
sons of Huron county, having for seventy-four years resided within its borders 
so that his memory compasses the period of almost its entire growth, forming a 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 395 

connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present. He has 
seen the forests cuts down and the fields cultivated until the district has been made 
to bloom and blossom as the rose and in the work of general improvement he has 
been deeply interested, bearing his full share as a public-spirited citizen. 



CHARLES A. COOLEY. 

Charles A. Cooley is a substantial and representative agriculturist of Wake- 
man township, Huron county, and comes from a family well known and prominent 
in the early history of this state. He was born in Brownhelm, Lorain county, on 
the 26th of February, 1866, a son of Charles E. and Anna A. (Bacon) Cooley, 
both natives of Lorain county. George Bacon, the maternal grandfather of our 
subject, in company with two brothers, came with his family to Ohio from Mas- 
sachusetts in. 1 81 8, the family being the second to locate in Brownhelm. The 
district was still covered with virgin forest and the three brothers had to clear a 
space large enough to build their cabins. They entered large tracts of land and 
concentrated their efforts upon the improvement and cultivation of the same. 
George Bacon became very prosperous in his agricultural undertaking and was 
also recognized as a prominent figure in public affairs. He was a civil engineer 
and in this capacity assisted in a large degree in the early work of laying out and 
developing the community. He served as county commissioner for a number of 
years and was also called to other offices, being recognized as a capable and wor- 
thy citizen. Moses B. Cooley, the paternal grandfather, brought his family to 
Ohio from Connecticut soon after the arrival of the Bacons and likewise cast in 
his lot with the early settlers in this section of the country, aiding in the work of 
reclaiming the wild district for purposes of civilization. He, too, met with marked 
success in his farming pursuits and became a great worker in church circles of the 
community. Both grandfathers lived to a ripe old age and were well known and 
influential men in their different spheres. 

Charles E. Cooley, the son of Moses B. Cooley, followed the occupation to 
which he was reared and became a prosperous farmer and one of the most ex- 
tensive landowners in Brownhelm. He was also active in public affairs and served 
for several years as the superintendent of the Lorain county infirmary. He mar- 
ried Miss Anna A. Bacon and in their family were two children, George E. and 
Charles A. The father's death occurred in Roodhouse, Illinois, August 28, 1898, 
while his first wife passed away in March, 1866. In 1872 he married Miss Addie 
Appleby, by whom he had one daughter, Addie, now the wife of Robert Crehore. 
His second wife died at Bay City, Michigan, December 20, 1907. 

Spending the years of his boyhood and youth upon his father's farm, Charles 
A. Cooley acquired his preliminary education in the schools of Brownhelm and 
later supplemented this training by a commercial course at Oberlin College. He 
remained at home, assisting his father in the cultivation of the fields until twenty- 
one years of age, when he went to South Dakota and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits on his own account. He was thus connected for eighteen months and then 
returned to Oberlin, Ohio, where he was identified with hotel interests in connec- 



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396 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

tion with his uncle, B. W. Lock, for a similar period. At the expiration of that 
time he went to Janesville, Wisconsin, and was there engaged in the dairy business 
for one year. 

Returning to Ohio in 1891, Mr. Cooley was united in marriage on the 16th of 
March of that year to Miss Jennie E. Morse, a daughter of George and Eliza 
(Ball) Mcrse, the former a prominent farmer of West Brownhelm and an ex- 
tensive landowner, who was also interested in all movements for the public good. 
He passed away August 24, 1886, his wife still making her home in West Brown- 
helm. Mr. and Mrs. Cooley began their domestic life on a farm in Wakeman 
township, Huron county, but the latter was permitted to enjoy her home for only 
two years, her death occurring on the 19th of March, 1893. On the 4th of Sep- 
tember, 1895, Mr. Cooley was again married, his second union being with Miss 
Ollie M. Whitney, a daughter of Theodore and Elizabeth (Parker) Whitney, of 
Elba, Nebraska, the father a former agriculturist of Huron county. Since his 
marriage Mr. Cooley has resided in Wakeman township and has devoted his time 
and attention to general farming and sheep raising, being a large wool and mutton 
dealer. He has concentrated all his energies upon his agricultural pursuits and 
has met with eminent success therein, being classed among the substantial farm- 
ers of his district. As he has prospered he has acquired considerable valuable 
property, his holdings now ranking him among the extensive landowners in his 
township. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Cooley has been blessed with four children : Lock 
C, George W., Anna E. and Leota M. The parents are members of the Congre- 
gational church and are interested to a great extent in the church and Sunday 
school work, Mrs. Cooley acting as superintendent of the primary department 
of the Sunday school. She is a woman of domestic tastes, greatly devoted to her 
home and family, and she is highly esteemed by all who know her for her many 
sterling traits of character. Mr. Cooley gives loyal support to the republican 
party and is most active in its interests, but he has never sought nor desired pub- 
lic office as a reward for party fealty. He and his wife occupy an enviable place 
in the social circles of the community, while their residence is a favorite resort 
with a host of warm friends. It is well supplied with the best standard and cur- 
rent literature and their home is at all times dominated by a spirit of culture and 
refinement. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM S. FOSTER. 

Among the many sons of Huron county, Ohio, who responded readily to their 
country's call for men to fight in her defense is notably Captain William S. Foster, 
who is a resident of Steuben, Greenfield township, and now lives in retirement 
upon a small tract of land which he owns, engaging in farming to a limited extent 
as a recreation rather thaii a means of livelihood, for the days of business are 
passed for him. Besides the property here Mr. Foster has some landholdings in 
Canada. One of Ohio's native sons, he was born in Norwalk on the 6th of No- 
vember, 1838, his parents being John H. and Nancy N. (Boardman) Foster. 
The former was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1812, and in 1830 came with his 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 397 

parents, Stephen and Mary Foster, to Ohio. The family settled in Norwalk, 
where the old people died, the son identifying himself with the life and interests 
here. He first taught school for a number of years and then was employed as 
clerk in the auditor's office. On going into business for himself he opened a 
wholesale and retail grocery, which was successfully conducted, and some years 
later he built the warehouse at Norwalk, which he gave into the charge of his son 
William S. Foster. But he did more than this for the city. After his arrival there 
he had acquired considerable property which he opened up for residential pur- 
poses, building several nice houses for others. One of the streets of this section 
has since been named Foster avenue after him. As the choice of the whig voters 
of the city he served as mayor before the war, although it was not the first office 
he had held at the request of the citizens. A good and noble man he was a con- 
sistent member of the Presbyterian church and died in that faith in 1878. His 
wife was born in New York state and was about fifteen years of age when her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Boardman, came to Norwalk, which was their 
home until their death. She likewise died there, in 1880, at the age of sixty-one, 
having reared a family of four children, namely: Frank, deceased; William S. ; 
John W., deceased ; and Louisa, who married Ralph King, of Toledo, Ohio. 

William S. Foster attended the public schools of Norwalk and then continued 
his education in a college in the Catskill mountains from which he was graduated 
in 1853, having taken a general course. His school days over, he returned to Nor- 
walk, where he had charge of the warehouse his father had built until the outbreak 
of the Civil war. Mr. Foster enjoys the distinction of having been the first man 
to enlist from Huron county. When the call for troops was sent through the coun- 
try he was in Cleveland, but on hearing that Captain Sawyer was in Norwalk try- 
ing to muster a company, he took the first train for home and there found no one 
of the Norwalk Light Swords, to which he belonged and which Captain Sawyer 
was trying to get to enlist, had had the initiative to be the first to enroll. They 
needed a leader, but within an hour after Captain Foster had put down his name 
there were one hundred and thirty young men ready and willing to fight for the 
Union. They were mustered in as Company D, Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
at Norwalk, Ohio, April 5, 1861, and proceeded to Cincinnati, where they joined 
the regiment and where their term of service was lengthened to three years. They 
then went to Camp Dennison and later to West Virginia, where their active par- 
ticipation in the war began. Captain Foster took part in the battles of Winchester 
and Stone River, being wounded in the neck in the latter. On this account he 
was sent to the hospital at Nashville but after six weeks was transferred to the 
hospital at Cincinnati and while there was recommended for promotion. On leav- 
ing the hospital he was given the rank of captain and was commissioned quar- 
termaster of all the western territory, with headquarters at Fort Laramie. At 
the close of the war he still remained in the service in the western states for three 
years, helping to fight the Indians and rendering the country safe for travelers, and 
as he was the first from Huron county to enlist, so he was the last to leave, when 
on the 6th of September, 1868, he was mustered out of the service, having been 
in seven years and four months. When his country no longer needed his aid he 
came back to Norwalk and after a short time engaged in building trestles for 
railroads. This business took him over the greater part of the United States and 



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398 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

Canada, being in Charleston, South Carolina, at the time of the earthquake there. 
In fact he was a guest at one of the city hotels that was completely destroyed, 
and remained in the city fcr some time afterward to assist in repairing the destruc- 
tion. In all he worked about thirty years at trestle building but is now living 
retired on his little farm, raising chickens and succulent green things. 

Captain Foster has never married. He finds abundant society and companion- 
ship, however, with his fellow members of the Grand Army post at Akron, Ohio. 
There the reminiscences of the days of fighting are retold and the past is con- 
trasted with the peacefulness of the present. 



CHARLES C. OWEN. 



Charles C. Owen, a progressive agriculturist of Greenfield township, is the 
owner and proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred and forty-five acres. It 
was on this farm on the 4th of February, 1858, that he was born and here he has 
followed agricultural pursuits for almost half a century, the neat appearance 
of his property and excellent condition of everything about the place being 
indicative of the prosperity which he has achieved. His parents were Lafayette 
S. and Mary J. (Clark) Owen, the former having been born in Herkimer 
county, New York, the son of John Owen, who came to this county about 1836 
and settled in Ripley township, where he bought the farm on which he spent 
the remainder of his life, passing away when he was about seventy years of 
age. 

Lafayette S. Owen was a lad of eleven years when he came with his parents 
to Huron county and throughout his boyhood he pursued his studies in an old 
log school house, where he mastered the elementary branches of learning therein 
taught, during the winter months when his assistance was not needed in the 
fields. After reaching man's estate he was enabled to purchase the present 
farm of our subject from the heirs of his mother-in-law. After a life of use- 
fulness, honesty of purpose and unfaltering industry, he here passed away in 
1904. He had married Mary J. Clark, who was born April 7, 1828, and died 
May 30, 1902. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clark, who 
came from Ireland, settling in this district about the year 1820, when the entire 
region was covered with timber and underbrush. He bought land to a con- 
siderable extent in this locality, which he cleared and cultivated. Like most of 
the early settlers he built for his home a small log house and lived in this 
county for about thirty years, his death having occurred about 1850. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lafayette S. Owen became the parents of four children: Alice J., who 
married William Ruggles, of Peru township ; Charles C, of this review ; Carrie 
E., who makes her home with her brother on the home farm; and Fannie E., 
who married Charles Snyder, of Peru township. 

Charles C. Owen attended the district schools during the winter months, 
and in the summer, assisting his father with the farm labor, learned through 
the school of experience valuable lessons in agriculture that served him well 
when, upon the death of his father, he was given full charge of the farm. 



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HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 401 

His sister, Carrie E., who yet remains at home, is his able assistant, managing 
the affairs of the household, while he carries on general farming. Devoting 
his entire time and attention to the further development of the fields, he takes 
no active part in politics and does not belong to any fraternal organizations. 
He is a man of social, genial nature, who readily wins friends, and in his busi- 
ness affairs his straightforward and reliable methods have won him classification 
with the representative agriculturists of the community. 



JOSEPH H. GLEASON. 

Joseph H. Glecscn is one of the successful farmers of Ripley township, but 
he is also one of that valiant number of Ohio's sons who forscok their homes and 
their com torts ror the sufferings of the battlefield when their country needed the 
support cf their arms. He owns one hundred and sixteen acres of land in the 
vicinity cf the village of Boughtonville, the farm on which he was born March 
I 5> l &43- The Gleascn family is of Scotch-Irish descent and the name Joseph 
has been borne by one of the sons for many generations, a great-great-grandfather 
of Joseph H. Gleason having been known by that cognomen and having transmit- 
ted it to his son Joseph, who in turn bestowed it upon his son who became the 
father of Caleb Gleason, the father of the subject of this sketch. On coming to 
this country the Gleason family settled in New York state, and there in Cayuga 
county was Caleb Gleason born. Shortly after his marriage, however, he removed 
to Ohio and settled on the farm which became the birthplace and has since been 
the home of his son Joseph H. Gleason. The woman who became his wife and the 
mother of his children was in her maidenhood Miss Melinda Hackett, a native 
of Maine, though her parents, Joseph and Sarah (Cross) Hackett, belonged to 
the state of New York. They were of Irish descent. Seven children were born 
to Caleb Gleason and his wife: Worthington, Loeta, Emily, Sarah, Charlotte, 
Martha and Joseph. 

Joseph H. Gleason was reared at home on the farm and received what edu- 
cation he could from the district schools. He was not of age when the Civil 
war was inaugurated, but the fact of his minority did not deter him from enlisting 
among the first of those ready to incur the hazards of the deadly struggle. On the 
9th of October, 1861, he was mustered into Company C, Sixty-fifth Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and after more than four years of service was honorably dis- 
charged December 28, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. In recognition of his bravery 
he was made a non-commissioned officer, serving as corporal and sergeant, for in 
the many engagements in which he participated several acts distinguished him 
from the rank and file of those about him. He fought at Shiloh, Stone River, 
Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, in the Atlanta campaign, at Franklin and at 
Nashville, and then, after the close of the war, was sent to Texas, where he re-' 
mnined until brought to Columbus to be discharged. In one of the skirmishes at 
Buzzards Roost he was severely wounded and carries the bullet today. When 
his country no longer required his services Mr. Gleason returned to his Ohio 
home and took up the life of the farmer to which he had been reared. The years 



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402 HISTORY OF HURON COUNTY 

have smiled upon his efforts, his toil has been richly remunerated, and his farm is 
one of the best cultivated as well as cne of the most fertile of Ripley township. 

On the conclusion of his career as a soldier, in 1865, Mr. Gleason was married 
to Miss Emeline Croxton, who was born March 23, 1843, and is a daughter of 
William and Susan (Gibson) Croxton, in whose family were eight children: 
Angeline, Emeline, Louisa, Antoinette, Samuel, Caroline, Florence and Milton. 
Of Mr. and Mrs. Gleason's union there have been born four children : Sherwood, 
Frank, Wilbur and Meda. 

Politically Mr. Gleason's sympathies are with the republican party which 
supported the nation in her hours of trial. He is not active in its ranks, however, 
nor a seeker for public preferment, though he has served the township as trustee 
and as assessor for a number of terms. In the meetings of the Grand Army post 
of Ripley he revives the memories of those days when a canteen or blanket shared 
made men closer than brothers. 



WALLACE W. KETCH UM. 

Wallace W. Ketchum, who owns and operates a fine farm of three hundred 
acres, is recognized as one of the prominent and progressive agriculturists of 
New London township and in his efforts is meeting with most gratify